Comcast SportsNet

Stephen Vogt Getty

A’s catcher Stephen Vogt’s story is one of perseverance, survival


OAKLAND -– It’s easy to define Stephen Vogt’s career by the long road he took to get to the majors.

He spent most of six years in the minor leagues, finally getting his first legitimate shot in the bigs with Oakland in 2013 at age 28. His story has been one of perseverance and survival.

Right now, the A’s catcher is gaining attention not for his background but what’s taking place in the present.

Vogt has put together one of the best all-around offensive seasons in the majors so far in 2015. Oakland went out and acquired players such as Billy Butler, Ike Davis and Ben Zobrist over the winter knowing they needed to replenish the heart of their lineup after trading away so many All-Stars.

But the man who has stepped up to grab the reins offensively was on their roster all along.

“You don’t see that much production out of a catcher,” A’s right fielder Josh Reddick said. “You expect catchers to hit .260, .270 and call a really good game, and he’s doing both of those right now. The damage he’s causing at the plate is just what we need in the heart of our lineup.”

Vogt, 30, is actually putting together some of the best across-the-board numbers in all of baseball. He entered Wednesday night leading the American League in RBI with 30. He ranks second in on base-plus-slugging percentage (1.098), is tied for fourth with nine homers and ranks fifth with a .337 batting average.

Vogt also leads all major league catchers in batting average, homers, RBI and OPS.

“I haven’t really though too much about it as to the ‘why’,” Vogt said. “I’ve typically always been a slow starter as far as seasons go. It feels good to be starting off pretty well. I don’t really know why there’s been more power, but I feel good at the plate. And with this lineup we have, I’m going to get pitches to hit.”

So good has he been that the A’s have been forced to re-think their plan to feature a straight platoon at the catcher position. Manager Bob Melvin said Tuesday that Vogt has earned the right to play on a regular basis. Josh Phegley drew the start in Wednesday’s 2-0 loss to Boston against Red Sox lefty Wade Miley, giving Vogt a rest in a day game after a night game.

Phegley has done nothing to lose playing time as much as Vogt has commanded it with his hot bat. It’s quite the scenario considering that the A’s couldn’t have known for sure entering spring training what they would get from Vogt. He was coming off of right foot surgery in October to repair the plantar plate and was limited at catcher during the spring.

To this point, he’s held up well enough physically to start 27 of the A’s 36 games at catcher. And on Tuesday night he showed terrific mobility, springing out from behind the plate to field Pablo Sandoval’s tapper and throw him out at first. An inning later, he made a sliding catch of Blake Swihart’s foul pop near the first base dugout.

“He still gets a little sore when he’s out there several days in a row,” Melvin said. “We have to be careful with him and not over-do it, especially the way he’s performing right now. But I couldn’t be happier with his performance.”

This essentially is Vogt’s first full season in the majors. He played 18 games with Tampa Bay in 2012 and then emerged as an important contributor with the A’s in 2013 after being called up in June. Last season, he didn’t make the club out of spring training but was called up early on before the foot injury relegated him to first base, outfield and DH duties.

This season he’s been indispensable. Vogt filled in well as the No. 3 hitter when Zobrist first went on the disabled list, and now he’s settled in as the No. 5 hitter with the hot-hitting Reddick batting third.

But perhaps Vogt’s toughest job is learning all the new pitchers that joined Oakland’s staff this year, and playing counselor to pitchers -– particularly the relievers –- who have struggled so far in this 13-23 season.

“I think any time you’re trying to get to know a teammate, you have to get to know them on all levels,” Vogt said. “ Some of the guys in spring, you get to know them and they go out and pitch well. But then you need to get to know them when they don’t have their stuff. So there’s that element of getting to know them with the growing pains of a season.”

A scary trip home from the ballpark in Baltimore

orioles logo

BALTIMORE – I’ve lived in Baltimore for 35 years, and have seen the Orioles win the World Series, the Ravens win the Super Bowl twice. I’ve seen disasters, too, incredible snowstorms, a train accident near Camden Yards that prevented games from being played, but never rioting.

When Oriole Park opened in 1992, I rejoiced. It was about 1 ½ miles from my house. It’s a short drive, perhaps 10 minutes, and usually it’s uneventful.

Monday was anything but uneventful.

I left for the ballpark around 2:45 p.m., and it took 25 minutes to get there. There was tension in the air, and when I went to the Orioles clubhouse, players watched coverage of the riots.

I wanted to believe the game would be played as scheduled, but when word came that most of the gates were closed, I knew that postponement was a possibility.

When the game was scrubbed, I gathered my belongings to head home, knowing I could write at home.

I drove up Paca Street, and though it was still daylight, there were few people and cars. I’ll be home in record time.

When I got to Centre Street, about halfway between my house and the ballpark, dozens of police in riot gear had blocked the street, and I turned right and went up Eutaw Street. There I saw some smashed windows on businesses, and as I drove closer to my house, my heart raced.

It seemed quiet there, but a few blocks from my house, I heard a radio report that a Rite-Aid had been looted. Just then, I saw a car stopped in front of me, and two kids carrying boxes were talking with the driver.

I sped around the car, found a parking space near my house, and watched as the kids carrying those boxes walked down my street.

From 1980-87, I lived in front of that Rite-Aid, five blocks away. Then, I learned that the neighboring discount food store and the hardware store had been looted, too.

I know the people who work in that hardware store. It’s been there ever since I’ve been here.

Looting five blocks from home.

I watched coverage of the riots until it was time for bed. I’ve always been a good sleeper and somehow I slept until my wife woke me up just after seven.

Sleep is a great escape. So is baseball.

I love covering baseball games, and covering my adopted hometown team has been a wonderful experience. The only dangers there are foul balls coming into the press box.

I’d like to experience those dangers again soon. The others I hope to never see again.

If the Phillies’ losing continues, Jonathan Papelbon will be disappointed if he’s not traded

Jonathan Papelbon

There’s no denying Jonathan Papelbon is a fierce competitor.

The five-time All-Star signed a $50 million contract with the Phillies back in 2011 because he felt he had a good chance to win baseball games and compete for a World Series.

But if you have listened closely to the Phillies’ outspoken closer, who is four saves away from breaking the club’s all-time record in that category, it’s clear he’s doesn’t think that’s possible with their current lineup.

In fact, Papelbon wants out. He thinks he can help a contending team win a championship, and said he will be disappointed if the Phillies are unable to move him this season.

“Yeah, I will be,” Papelbon said in an interview with Phillies Insider Jim Salisbury. “If we continue to lose.

“If we can rebuild this situation and make it right, and we can get some wins underneath our belt and Ryne Sandberg can get us going, that’s a whole different story. To me, that’s a better part of the story because now I’ve been a part of this remodeling. I’ve been a part of getting this bullpen correct. I’ve been a part of something that’s becoming a winning tradition and going back to the way it was before I got here. To me, there’s no better reward than that.”

Papelbon has never been afraid to speak his mind. He doesn’t care what fans think about him, either. Right now, his only concern is closing out games.

The 34-year-old, however, raised eyebrows earlier this month when he said he doesn’t “feel much like a Phillie” and pined for his old club, the Boston Red Sox.

“I’m not here to be disrespectful,” Papelbon said. “I’m not gonna sit here and give you the old cliche ‘we’re gonna try to do good, hopefully everything turns out good.’ That’s just not me, that’s not how I pitch, that’s not who I am. What I meant is, when my career is all said and done, like we were talking about earlier, I’m gonna look back and feel like I was part of a Red Sox franchise more than I was with the Phillies. Just like Jayson Werth would probably say he’s more of a Phillie than a National.”

Still, Papelbon has no regrets about his decision to come to Philadelphia.

“No, no regrets,” he said. “I signed here. These guys gave me the largest contract in baseball history for a closer. Yeah, it’s frustrating when you come here and you expect certain things, and my competitiveness is such a high level, when that doesn’t happen and you put so much into it and you don’t get what you necessarily want out of it, yeah I say that’s frustrating. That’s frustrating for anyone. I think I just tend to be more vocal about it and that’s it.”

Papelbon also made it clear he’s not interested in playing another season clouded by trade rumors. If it’s possible, he wants to get a deal done.

“I will be disappointed if this continues to happen,” he said.

What’s this?

“If we continue to do the same things as we’ve done the last couple years with me, where we try to do something and get something done with me and then nothing still happens.”

Papelbon is off to a strong start to the 2015 season. In six appearances, he’s allowed just one hit, no walks and has struck out six batters. He’s also converted all three of his save attempts.

So, if given the opportunity, could Papelbon capture a second World Series title before his career comes to a close?

“Yeah, 100 percent,” he said. “That’s what I come to work for every single day.”