Author: Mike Florio

Rob Dibble won't be calling Nationals games any time soon


Nationals television analyst Rob Dibble was initially said to be on a two-game “vacation” after telling Stephen Strasburg to “suck it up” and “stop crying” about the elbow injury that proved to require Tommy John surgery, but he wasn’t on the air for either game this weekend and now MASN has announced that he won’t be with the team on their six-day road trip that begins tonight in Florida.
Asked to provide further details, MASN spokesperson Todd Webster said: “He asked for and was granted a few days off. Beyond that, I don’t have a comment.”
I’ve already written plenty about Dibble’s comments, so I won’t rehash that now, but suffice it to say that every Nationals fan I know is hoping they’ve seen and heard the last of him on the team’s broadcasts. And that really has very little to do with what he said about Strasburg.
Ray Knight has been subbing for Dibble and, while I’ve not tuned in to hear him yet, I can say with the utmost confidence that he’s a massive upgrade. If a good, well-liked announcer says something stupid, perhaps you give him a pass. If a terrible, almost universally disliked announcer says something stupid, just weeks after also saying something stupid … well, why not give Nationals fans some good news for once and drop him?

Derek Lowe stays quiet about pitching through possible injury

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After lasting just three innings Sunday in his shortest start of the season Derek Lowe told David O’Brien of the Atlanta Journal Constitution that he was having trouble gripping the ball, but declined to elaborate when asked if he’s pitching through an injury.
O’Brien notes that Lowe “shook his hand to his side at least twice between pitches, as if trying to loosen it” and “seemed uncomfortable” when questioned about it afterward.
Lowe said merely “I don’t know what to say” and “I’m not good at this [discussing his health status]” while manager Bobby Cox offered only “I don’t know, he shakes his hand a lot.”
While his win-loss record isn’t very good, Lowe had actually pitched pretty well recently before struggling yesterday. Prior to the loss against the Marlins he posted a 3.26 ERA and 19/4 K/BB ratio in five starts this month, so any injury is seemingly a new development.

Can we stop pretending that Manny Ramirez isn't any good?


Manny Ramirez was benched in favor of Scott Podsednik, claimed off waivers and let go just to save money, and ended his Dodgers career by getting ejected in the middle of an at-bat yesterday, so the number of articles being written with the premise that he’s a useless bum is at an all-time high.
Before buying into those arguments, here are some counter-arguments I hope you’ll at least consider …
First and foremost Ramirez is hitting .311/.405/.510 this season, which is good for a .915 OPS that ranks as the fourth-highest in the league among all hitters with at least 200 plate appearances:

Joey Votto          1.023
Albert Pujols       1.019
Carlos Gonzalez      .955
MANNY RAMIREZ        .915
Adrian Gonzalez      .909

Now, to me that alone would be enough to suggest that Ramirez is still pretty damn good, but the above numbers don’t seem to have had the same impact on many mainstream writers. So, take a look at this, which is the Dodgers’ scoring and record with and without Ramirez in the lineup this season:

                      R/G       W-L
With Ramirez          5.1     32-22
Without Ramirez       3.7     35-42

When the Dodgers have started Ramirez this season they’ve scored 5.1 runs per game and have a 32-22 record. When the Dodgers haven’t started Ramirez this season they’ve scored 3.7 runs per game and have a 35-42 record.
So, the guy ranks fourth in the league with a .915 OPS, his team has scored 38 percent more runs per game with him in the lineup, and they have a .593 winning percentage with him compared to a .455 winning percentage without him. I realize he has plenty of faults, has missed time with injuries, and can be a pain in the ass, but can we at least stop this charade about him no longer being a really, really, really good hitter?
When sportswriters (and fans, too) like a player personally they naturally tend to overstate his ability and value (see: Eckstein, David), but as we’re seeing now the opposite is certainly true about Ramirez. Based on the hundreds of mainstream articles written about him during the past couple weeks you’d assume he was hitting .225 and the Dodgers were thriving without him, when in reality that’s far from the case.
Manny Ramirez is a lot of things, but a bad hitter still isn’t one of them.

Carl Crawford is the eighth member of the 400-100-100 club


This definitely qualifies as more “interesting” than “significant” but Carl Crawford hit his 100th career homer last night to become just the eighth player in baseball history with 100 homers, 100 triples, and 400 steals.
The other guys in the 400-100-100 club: Ty Cobb, Tris Speaker, Lou Brock, Frankie Frisch, Kenny Lofton, Paul Molitor, and Tim Raines. All but Raines and Lofton are in the Hall of Fame, and Raines is deserving of a spot in Cooperstown even though he’ll probably never get voted in (and a decent argument can perhaps be made for Lofton too).
Not bad company, especially since Crawford just turned 29 years old earlier this month. He has a chance to crack 20 homers for the first time this season, and since debuting in mid-2002 his 100 triples are the most in baseball and he has more steals (403) than everyone but Juan Pierre (457).

Angels rookie Jordan Walden throws really, really hard

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Joel Zumaya amazingly never ceased being the hardest-thrower in baseball even while battling all kinds of arm injuries over the past few years, averaging 99.3 miles per hour with his fastball both this season and last season.
However, now that Zumaya is sidelined while recovering from July elbow surgery the “hardest-thrower” title is vacant and R.J. Anderson of Fan Graphs writes that Angels rookie reliever Jordan Walden may be ready to claim it.
Called up last week, Walden has made three appearances, faced 13 batters, and thrown a total of 50 pitches. Of those 50 pitches 36 have been fastballs and they’ve clocked in at an average of 98.9 miles per hour. I watched in awe as he repeatedly cracked triple-digits in his big-league debut against my beloved Twins last week, but was surprised to find that his minor-league numbers aren’t nearly as jaw-dropping.
He moved from the rotation to the bullpen this season, posting a 3.44 ERA, .277 opponents’ batting average, and 41/24 K/BB ratio in 50 innings between Double-A and Triple-A before the call-up. Those certainly aren’t terrible numbers, but managing just 41 strikeouts in 50 innings while opponents bat .277 sure seems odd given his incredible fastball velocity and seemingly solid slider.
Consistently throwing strikes appears to be Walden’s biggest issue, but if he can harness his raw stuff while continuing to pump 99-mph heat at hitters from a low arm angle he sure looks like a potentially dominant late-inning reliever. And he may just be the hardest-thrower in baseball, at least until Aroldis Chapman and his mythical 105-mph fastball arrive in Cincinnati later this week.