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Junior Guerra headed to disabled list with a calf strain

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MLB.com’s Adam McCalvy reports that Brewers pitcher Junior Guerra is headed to the 10-day disabled list with a strained right calf suffered during Monday’s Opening Day start against the Rockies. Guerra laid down a sacrifice bunt in the third inning and came up limping after running down the first base line. Manager Craig Counsell said that Guerra is going to need more than the minimum 10 days to recover, McCalvy added.

On the mound, Guerra gave up a pair of runs on one hit and one hit batsman with no walks and four strikeouts across three innings. The right-hander impressed in 20 starts last season, finishing with a 9-3 record, a 2.81 ERA, and a 100/43 K/BB ratio in 121 2/3 innings.

Tommy Milone, who relieved Guerra on Monday, figures to move into the Brewers’ rotation while Guerra is on the mend.

29.8% of players on 2017 Opening Day rosters born outside the U.S., setting new record

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Major League Baseball announced on Monday that 259 players on rosters to open the 2017 season — 29.8 percent — were born outside the United States. That sets a new record. Those 259 players span 19 different countries and territories.

The previous record for total players born outside the U.S. on Opening Day rosters was 246 in 2007, and the previous record for percentage was 29.2 percent in 2005.

The Dominican Republic is the foreign nation with the most players on MLB rosters at 93. The only other countries with more than 10 are Venezuela (77), Cuba (23), and Puerto Rico (16).

The Rangers have the most foreign-born players on its roster with 14 players spanning six countries and territories. The only other teams with more than 10 are the Padres (12), Mariners (12), White Sox (11), Indians (11), Angels (11), and Phillies (11). The Royals have the most players from different countries and territories with eight.

Rob Manfred plans to include players on future pace of play changes

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During an in-game interview on ESPN on Sunday night, Commissioner Rob Manfred said he plans to include the players in future analyses aimed at improving baseball’s pace of play, ESPN reports.

Manfred said, “We’re going to work with [MLBPA executive director] Tony [Clark] and try to get small groups of players together to show them the research we’re looking at, the fan research that we’re looking at, so they’re seeing the same data that we’re seeing.”

Major League Baseball can make unilateral changes to the rules without approval of the Major League Baseball Players Association, as it gave the MLBPA a one-year notice.

Manfred also called the new intentional walk rule — which allows a manager to signal for an intentional walk rather than having his pitcher throw four pitches out of the strike zone — symbolic in the league’s attempt to improve the sport’s pace of play.