Bill Baer

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Giancarlo Stanton frustrated with Marlins’ losing

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The Marlins lost again on Thursday night, suffering a 7-2 defeat at the hands of the Dodgers to fall to 14-26 on the season. The club has lost four game in a row and nine of its last 10.

Giancarlo Stanton, who has not seen his Marlins finish above .500 since he debuted in 2010, says his frustration level with the team is the “highest ever,” Clark Spencer of the Miami Herald reports. “It’ shigher than me being the worst player on the field for a month, the worst player in the big leagues for a month, last year,” Stanton said.

Stanton continued, “We’ve had some bad luck with injuries, and we haven’t been playing well. Just a funk. But we’ve got to get out of it or the season is going to be twice as long as the last few years.”

Stanton is doing his part. He’s hitting .263/.339/.533 with 11 home runs and 27 RBI in 171 plate appearances this season. But the club has dealt with a litany of injuries, and Christian Yelich and Dee Gordon are not performing as expected. The starting pitching has been abysmal and the bullpen hasn’t been dependable outside of A.J. Ramos and Kyle Barraclough.

The Marlins are already 11 games out of first place. While there’s still plenty of baseball left, it would be out of character to see the Marlins made additions to strengthen the team between now and the July 31 trade deadline, so it’s likely just up to the existing roster to try to turn things around.

Luke Maile, Marcus Stroman become first AL battery to hit back-to-back homers since 1970

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I mentioned this in today’s And That Happened — Blue Jays catcher Luke Maile and pitcher Marcus Stroman, on Thursday against the Braves, became the first American League battery to hit back-to-back home runs since 1970, according to Sportsnet. In that game on May 9, catcher Tom Egan and pitcher Andy Messersmith accomplished the feat in the second inning against the Yankees.

Stroman finished 1-for-3 on the evening. In his only other offensive appearance of the season, he hit a pinch-hit double and scored the tie-breaking run in the top of the 11th against the Cardinals on April 25.

Video: Adam Jones shares the player’s point of view

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Earlier this month, Orioles outfielder Adam Jones was the recipient of some hateful actions at Fenway Park. One fan attempted to throw peanuts at him while another shouted a racist epithet at him from the center field seats. The Red Sox handled the situation well, apologizing to Jones and vowing to do better than it comes to handling fan misconduct.

Unfortunately, Jones’ story is all too common. Yankees pitcher CC Sabathia backed up Jones’ story, saying he’d only been called the N-word in Boston. Red Sox pitcher David Price said he was the recipient of racist slurs from Boston fans last year when he struggled. Outfielder Jackie Bradley, Jr. said the same when he got off to a slow start in 2014. Barry Bonds, in 2004, said he’d never play in Boston because the city is “too racist for me.” Vernon Wells said Fenway Park was one of the only two stadiums he was warned about where racially motivated comments might occur.

Despite the preponderance of testimony from players past and present, as well as the statistics which show that black people face a totally different reality than white people, Jones still found skeptics. Given his platform, Curt Schilling was the loudest, claiming Jones made the whole thing up for attention.

Jones wrote a short column and shot a video for The Players’ Tribune addressing the situation as well as his skeptics.

Kudos to Jones for continuing to speak up about this. The aim of Jones’ skeptics is not just to dissuade Jones from pressing the issue, but to dissuade other people who face similar issues every day from speaking up. The end result, they hope, is a society that remains unchanged despite its fatal flaws.