Author: Craig Calcaterra

vin scully getty

Vin Scully to cut back on his schedule next year


Vin Scully is coming back for another year in the Dodgers broadcast booth in 2015, but he may cut it back. Scully already limits road trips to Arizona, San Francisco, Anaheim and San Diego, but next year he may just do Dodgers home games plus the interleague games in Anaheim. From Bill Shaikin at the L.A. Times:

“I’m going to go to Anaheim for sure,” Scully said Tuesday night. “But I’m going to try to cut back on nights on the road. I really want to spend more time at home.”

Scully is reserving the right to do road games in San Francisco, Arizona and San Diego if the Dodgers are in contention, but will likely sit them out early in the season.

Guy has earned the right to do whatever the hell he wants, of course. And a bit more than 50% of Dodgers games with Scully is better than no Dodgers games with Scully.

I’m not sure how I’d feel about becoming a citizen of Puig Nation

yasiel puig getty

I don’t have to tell you all how much of a Yasiel Puig fanboy I am. I love the guy! But this definitely gives me pause:

I can’t imagine the trains run on time in Puig Nation. And as Twitter follower Half Empty noted this morning, “Trains? I’d be more worried about all the stop signs being ignored.” I imagine Puig Nation would be a fun place, but boy-howdy would it be chaotic and occasionally dangerous. Plus, we’d always be at war with someone or other. Probably too much hassle to move there.

In other news, I do feel like it’s necessary to say that, no Puig showing up five minutes before workouts yesterday was not cool, especially considering he didn’t know he had the day off until he got there. Bad form, especially considering how poorly Puig played in the month of August. Maybe it isn’t fair, but you get more leeway when you’re raking, and he ain’t raking.

Anyway, I say it’s necessary, because I realize my Puig-love often gets me accused of defending every single thing he does. Even if I don’t think it’s the end of the world or a reasonable basis for 1000-word thinkpieces about his mental state and the future of our children, I don’t defend this sort of thing.

Dominican players can always count on home cooking when they’re on the road

Dominican food

Reader emdash gives me the heads up on a neat story from James Wagner at the Washington Post. It’s about how a network of Dominican players in the majors makes a point to supply visiting Dominican players with Dominican food when they come to town:

Do you know how hard it is to find a Dominican restaurant in Cincinnati or Minneapolis?

So Dominican players — even those who don’t know each other well — take care of each other through their own version of the food network. The Dominicans on the home team are responsible for sending food to their countrymen on the visiting team. Albert Pujols (Los Angeles Angels), David Ortiz (Boston) and Nelson Cruz (Baltimore) always bring food for visiting Dominican players. Soriano’s wife or a family friend will make an extra helping of Dominican food so that he can do the same. Robinson Cano (Seattle), Francisco Liriano (Pittsburgh), Carlos Gomez (Milwaukee), Jose Reyes (Toronto) and Adrian Beltre (Texas) take part, too.

Wagner says that it’s believed the tradition started with Vlad Guerrero — as if he wasn’t awesome enough — and has become really well-established. He talks about the wives and mothers of the players who spend their time cooking to keep the tradition going.

Very cool story.

Did Jackie Bradley, Jr.’s attitude get him sent down to the minors?

Boston Red Sox Jackie Bradley singles in front of New York Yankees Chris Stewart in MLB game in New York

When Jackie Bradley, Jr. started to draw a lot of notice, he was lauded to great degree for his attitude and work ethic. Indeed, some scribes got rather prickly if anyone dared to criticize Bradley or suggest that, maybe, he wasn’t ready to play every day in Boston.

This year his offensive performance was a big problem for the Sox, and he was eventually sent down to Pawtucket. But Joon Lee of Over the Monster reports that it may have been more than his lack of hitting that earned him a stint in the minors:

According to two league sources, there was a growing sense of frustration within the Red Sox clubhouse — both coaches and players — with Bradley due to his perceived “stubbornness with the coaching staff.” One source added that Bradley was unwilling to work with coaches to fix his swing. Both sources said Bradley’s attitude was one of the main reasons he was sent to the minors.

Did Bradley become frustrated as a result of his struggles? Or is it possible that the enthusiasm some had for him last year was premature?

Hard to say from the outside, of course. But one thing is certain: with Mookie Betts emerging and Rusney Castillo now in the organization, it could be a crowded center field situation in Boston and Bradley can’t afford to have anything else working against him at the moment.

Craig Biggio could be a top candidate for the Astros job

Craig Biggio

Marc Carig of Newsday notes — as some others have noted in the past two days — that Craig Biggio could be a top candidate to become the next Astros manager. He talks to one of Biggio’s former managers, Terry Collins, about Biggio’s chances to do well in the job. Not surprisingly, Collins thinks he’d be a fantastic choice.

Biggio’s lack of coaching or managing experience would not, in this day and age, be unprecedented of course. Brad Ausmus, Mike Matheny and host of other former players have recently taken skipper positions with little or, in some cases, no coaching or managing experience at all. It would be a bit odd in this particular situation in that, for the most part, the relatively inexperienced guys have taken over teams either laden with veterans or already strongly in contention. The Astros certainly aren’t that and, one would think, could still use someone who can be a teacher too. But really, given how much say front offices — especially Houston’s front office — have in day-to-day decisions, one wonders if clubs even care all that much about it anymore.