Author: Craig Calcaterra

Chicago White Sox v Cleveland Indians

The Indians have a standing offer to Jason Giambi for a non-playing role


Eventually Jason Giambi will have to stop playing. He may not have his brain around it yet, but the guy will be 44 this year, so the end is nigh. Heck, the end was probably a couple of years ago, but his likability and presence in the clubhouse is valued enough to where the Rockies and then the Indians have let him keep playing.

In the likely event that he can’t snag a job as a player this year, though, he can still make it to spring training:

He’s turned down coaching opportunities in the past. Given that he has a .185 batting average in 157 games dating back to 2012, my guess is that he won’t turn them down much longer.

The 10th best general manager of all time was a lawyer and sportswriter first. Hey . . .

Frank Cashen

Mark Armour and Dan Levitt have written a book: In Pursuit of Pennants, which examines how front offices have historically found innovative ways to build winning teams. In support of that, they are counting down the top-25 GMs of all time over at their blog. Since it’s slow season, I’m going to continue linking to the countdown as it’s great stuff we rarely read about in the normal course.

Before Frank Cashen got into the baseball business he was a sportswriter, a lawyer and worked for a brewery. Basically, he lived my life and followed my passions. The only difference is that he had a clue about how to run a baseball team too, so he was able to build the Orioles of the 60s and 70s and then build the Mets of the 80s. I’ll likely write more about sports and drink more beer. Advantage: Cashen.

Go read Mark and Dan’s take on him here.

The Giants and Brandon Belt avoid arbitration

brandon belt giants getty
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Jon Heyman reports that the Giants and Brandon Belt avoided arbitration by agreeing to a one-year, $3.6 million contract. Belt had asked for $4.5 million and was offered $3 million from the Giants when arbitration figures were exchanged.

Belt’s 2014 was derailed by injuries, causing him to appear in just 61 games last season. He hit .243/.306/.449 with 12 homers. Which explains why the settlement number was a lot closer to the Giants’ submission than his own.

Belt has two more trips through arbitration in his future and can become a free agent following the 2017 season.