Craig Calcaterra

Blogger at NBC Sport.com's HardballTalk. Recovering litigator. Rake. Scoundrel. Notorious Man-About-Town.
Associated Press

Padres GM A.J. Preller suspended 30 days over the Drew Pomeranz trade.

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We wrote a few minutes ago about the investigation into Padres GM A.J. Preller and how he allegedly kept two sets of medical records in order to deceive trade partners. Major League Baseball just weighed in on at least one part of that investigation.

The league has suspended Preller for 30 days:

Major League Baseball has completed an investigation into the July 14th transaction in which pitcher Drew Pomeranz was traded from the San Diego Padres to the Boston Red Sox.  MLB’s Department of Investigations conducted the thorough review, which included interviews with relevant individuals from both Clubs.  The findings were submitted to Commissioner Robert D. Manfred, Jr.

As a result of this matter, Major League Baseball announced today that A.J. Preller, Executive Vice President and General Manager of the Padres, has received a 30-day suspension without pay.

The statement says nothing else of substance. It does not say what, exactly, Preller did wrong. Nor does it weigh in on the Padres’ other controversial transaction this summer involving Collin Rea to the Marlins.

With respect to Pomeranz, it is known that, after acquiring him from San Diego, the Red Sox became aware of certain preventative health measures provided for Pomeranz by the Padres that weren’t disclosed in baseball’s medical database.

Thirty days for Preller is something one presumes that he can endure just fine given what he likely makes. The far more significant angle to this is what 29 other general managers think about dealing with him and the Padres now that they know he’s been trying to put something over on them.

The Yankees will honor David Ortiz at a pregame ceremony

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The Yankees announced today that they will honor retiring Red Sox DH David Ortiz with a pregame ceremony before the September 29th game at Yankee Stadium.

Ten or twelve years ago this would’ve been inconceivable, as the Yankees and Red Sox didn’t like each other much. These days, however, people only go through the motions of the Yankess and Sox being rivals, it seems. Indeed, when Derek Jeter retired a couple of years ago, the Red Sox honored him before his final game, which took place at Fenway Park. David Ortiz even held up the “RE2PECT” sign:

BOSTON, MA - SEPTEMBER 28: David Ortiz #34 and Xander Bogaerts #2 of the Boston Red Sox present Derek Jeter #2 of the New York Yankees with a piece of the Green Monster signed by all members of the Boston Red Sox prior to the last game of the season at Fenway Park on September 28, 2014 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Jim Rogash/Getty Images)

Whats good for The Captain is good for Big Papi.

David Dahl is fatigued. Are publicly-financed stadium politics to blame?

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A fairly minor blurb appeared in the Denver Post this morning: David Dahl, the Rockies rookie outfielder, has been benched for a few days running. Why? Fatigue. Having been in the lower levels of the minors until this year, it’s his longest season ever. It’s understandable that he’d be gassed.

But there was something else gassing him too: he played 76 games for the Double-A Hartford Yard Goats. A team without a home ballpark.

We talked about the Yard Goats’ situation before the season began. At the time there were disputes about the completion of their new publicly-funded ballpark which inspired the franchise to move from New Britain. The opening was delayed. The disputes have continued all year, however, construction stopped and the park still sits uncompleted. That led to the Yard Goats playing their entire 141 game schedule on the road.

The Yard Goats did alright all things considered, finishing 74-67. And certainly Dahl played well, slugging .500 and leading the team in homers despite playing in only a little over half of their games. Still, you have to wonder if being on the road for all of that time took some of the wind out of his sails. And the sails of other Rockies prospects, many of whom played the whole season riding busses.

All because of the politics of getting a city to pay for a new ballpark.