Author: Bob Harkins

Image of Dodger Stadium beating victim Stow is shown on scoreboard before MLB National League baseball game between San Francisco Giants and St. Louis Cardinals in San Francisco, California

Bryan Stow might be changing hospitals

Leave a comment

Bryan Stow, the San Francisco Giants fan who was attacked and brutally beaten at Dodger Stadium on March 31, might be transferred to a hospital closer to his home in the Bay Area, reports Jon Paul Morosi over at Fox Sports.

Stow, who currently has stable vital signs but is comatose, has been treated at the Los Angeles County + University of Southern California Medical Center since the attack.

The family wants him moved closer to home, and the doctors will likely approve the move next week.

Doctors likely will approve the transfer, as long as Stow doesn’t have any further seizure activity and maintains stable vital signs. He has had stable vital signs since Monday but remains comatose and in critical condition, Saca said.

Meanwhile, a Los Angeles advertising company is unveiling some 300 billboards around the area to help find Stow’s attackers, who are still on the loose. There is promised reward money of at least $120,000 for information leading to their arrest.

You can follow Bob on Twitter, and get all your HBT updates here.

Colby Lewis succeeds because of family, not despite it

Spring Training -Texas Rangers - Colby Lewis

Craig has been all over the Richie Whitt-Colby Lewis story, rightly pointing out the absurdity of the whole thing.

If you’re unfamiliar with this story, the writer (Whitt) thinks that the Rangers pitcher (Lewis) should be ashamed of himself for missing a start to witness the birth of his child because …

(a) It’s Lewis’ second child, making it somehow less important.

(b) And Lewis for some reason owes the fans and his team more than he does his family.

I agree with everything Craig has written on the topic, but would also like to add a bit of insight I gained by sitting down with Lewis for an interview at spring training. I spoke to Lewis as part of a feature package I wrote on the difficulties of making it to the majors. Lewis talked at length of his own journey, including the injuries he endured along the way, and his two-year detour to professional baseball in Japan.

During our talk, he frequently sprinkled in references to his family, some of which did not make it into my story. He mentioned how in the spring of 2007, the Washington Nationals released him on the day his son was born. He said that was a blessing, however, because Oakland signed him a few days later and assigned him to Triple-A Sacramento, near his Bakersfield, Calif. home.

He also spoke about how lucky he was that his wife, Jenny, and son could accompany him to Japan, and how important it has been to have her support. And Lewis said this about how much family means to him:

“(It changes things) when you have a baby you have to support now. It’s something that clicked for me and took over my life. It’s a blessing. It kept me a lot more focused on the task of what I wanted to do.”

Richie Whitt says he doesn’t care if Lewis is a good dad, he just wants him to be a good pitcher. But those things don’t have to be mutually exclusive. Lewis not only understands that, he claims that having a family made him a better pitcher and made him happier.

That’s what should matter most.

You can follow Bob on Twitter, and get all your HBT updates here.

Is Aroldis Chapman’s drop in velocity cause for concern?


Is Aroldis Chapman pitching hurt? Is he already being overworked? Cincinnati Reds catcher Ramon Hernandez seems to be concerned.

During the eighth inning of Wednesday’s 3-2 defeat to the San Diego Padres, Hernandez called pitching coach Bryan Price and trainer Paul Lessard to the mound after noticing the flamethrower’s velocity was way down.

This is what Hernandez told John Fay of the Cincinnati Enquirer:

“Yesterday, he threw what 93, 94″,” Hernandez said. “Then today, he’s throwing 91. He’s throws almost 100 over every pitch. Now, he can’t get up to 93. There’s got to be something. You can’t lose it in one day.”

A guy who threw a record 105-mph fastball last season suddenly unable to reach 93? Cue the alarm bells, right? Maybe not.

Chapman faced just two batters, allowing a walk and committing an error. He was removed after he recorded his lone out. But manager Dusty Baker said that was just a precaution, stating “he said he was OK, but that’s Cuban baseball.”

Hernandez also chalked it up to a young guy trying to be tough and pitch through pain and fatigue. He said he spoke to the 23-year-old pitcher, who was pitching for the fourth time in five days, and advised him that it can be better to miss a couple days then suffer an injury that puts him out of action for a longer stretch of time.

“He’s got a lot of stress …,” Hernandez told Fay, “I think he’s going to be OK.”

Reds fans certainly hope so.

You can follow Bob on Twitter, and get all your HBT updates here.

Vote: Does verdict affect Barry Bonds’ legacy?

Oklahoma City Thunder v Los Angeles Lakers, Game 5

A jury has found Barry Bonds guilty on a charge of obstruction of justice, and was unable to come to a verdict on three other counts of lying to a grand jury in 2003.

We can debate the sense of the jury’s conclusion elsewhere, but let’s also consider what — if anything — this does for the legacy of baseball’s all-time home run hitter.

Pedro Martinez wouldn’t mind finishing career with Red Sox


Every once in a while someone gets ahold of Pedro Martinez, talks to him about what he’s doing these days, and then gets around to asking the inevitable question: “Are you going to play again?”

Martinez has consistently said his return to baseball is unlikely, and that might still be true. But his tune is changing just a bit. Speaking to Joe Brescia of the New York Times, Martinez said he is not only interested in returning to MLB, but would prefer to finish up his career in Boston and officially retire as a member of the Red Sox.

I’d probably have to say the Red Sox. I would like to win a World Series in the National League, so the Phillies are in there, too. But for the time I’m going to be playing, I think Boston is more suitable so that I can retire with the Boston Red Sox and go to the Hall of Fame with the same hat.

Are you listening, Theo Epstein? After Clay Buchholz’s start today, you might want to consider it. Although, at the current pace, stocking up on arms for a pennant chase might be a pointless endeavor.

Martinez, 39, said he is in good shape right now and could be ready to take a mound within a month or so if need be. Over the course of his 18-year career, the certain Hall of Famer struck out 3,154 batters in 2,827.1 innings, going 219-100 with a 2.93 ERA. He last played in 2009 for the Phillies, when he was 5-1 with a 3.63 ERA in nine games.

You can follow Bob on Twitter, and get all your HBT updates here.