Bob Harkins


It’s good to be the king: David Freese wows ’em at Macy’s


After his heroics in the World Series, you had to know that life was going to become very, very good for David Freese.

As a Cardinal playing in his native St. Louis, the World Series MVP might never again be forced to buy his own drink or pay for his own dinner, even if he regresses to Willie Bloomquist for the rest of his career.

From tooling around in his brand new Corvette, to hanging out on the “Tonight Show” with Justin Bieber (right), the offseason is going to be quite enjoyable for the 28-year-old third baseman.

And if you think I’m lying, check out this headline from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch: David Freese wows a Macy’s Galleria crowd.

Yeah that’s right, the Richmond Heights, Mo. Macy’s was abuzz on Wednesday, and I’m not exaggerating. According to the story, fans started getting in line the night before to snag one of the 275 wristbands that gave them a chance to take part in the event. The wristband gave the bearer the right to spend “at least $50 on Macy’s merchandise,” which you have to admit is quite a deal all by itself. (Think they sold any of these?)

But of course that’s not all they got, the big payoff being a signed baseball from their hero. Not too bad when you think about it, for the fans or for Freese.

Enjoy your new-found celebrity Mr. MVP. It’s good to be the king.

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David Ortiz wins Clemente Award, says he’d like to return to Red Sox

Red Sox' Ortiz watches his two-run home run with Yankees' Cervelli during their MLB American League baseball game in Boston

David Ortiz, who will be a free agent this winter, said last week that he was open to joining the New York Yankees next season.

On Thursday, while speaking to reporters in St. Louis after winning the Roberto Clemente Award, Ortiz clarified those comments about free agency. The upshot? People made too much about what he said about the Yankees, and he would actually like to return to Boston once the Theo Epstein mess is sorted out and the team finds a new manager.

“Of course, I would like to come back,” he said. “They have a lot of things going on right now. So once they go through all the stuff, GM and managing things, I think they’re going to start talking to the players. So, we’ll see. We’ve got time.”

And what about the Yankees?

“I never said that I would sign with the Yankees. No, no, no, no, no, no, no, no,” he said. “They asked me if I would play for the Yankees. I said I would think about it. But I didn’t confirm to nobody that I would play for the Yankees. I’m still a Red Sox, aren’t I?”

Ortiz is right, of course. All he said was that he would have to think about going to New York if the Yankees showed interest, which seems like a perfectly reasonable way to approach free agency. That being said, he shouldn’t be surprised by the reaction given the nature of the Red Sox-Yankees rivalry.

So there you have it. To sum up: David Ortiz would consider being a Yankee, but would like to stay in Boston. Also, he didn’t say it, but I’m guessing he would play in Seattle or Kansas City if the money was right. OK well, really right.

Now, back to the World Series …

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In Game 2, Rangers turn to playoff ace … Colby Lewis?


ST. LOUIS — All the talk about bad starting pitching from these two World Series teams — and the numbers to back it up — has taken the focus away from the hottest starting pitcher in the last two postseasons.

Who’s that, you’re thinking?

Colby Lewis, that’s who.

The Rangers’ Game 2 starter is the only starting pitcher on either team other than Chris Carpenter to do much this postseason. He delivered a gem in a crucial ALDS Game 3 in Tampa: One hit allowed, two walks, six strikeouts in a 4-3 Rangers victory that gave them a 2-1 series lead.

Lewis’  ALCS start in Detroit wasn’t nearly as good — but it wasn’t terrible either.

He trailed Doug Fister 2-0 in the sixth inning before giving up a solo homer and an RBI single and leaving with four runs and eights hits allowed — along with six strikeouts — in 5.2 innings.

That was Lewis’ first loss in six starts over the last two postseasons, and left him with this line: 4-1, 2.37, 38 IP, 25 hits, 36 strikeouts. Who needs to spend a boatload of cash to re-sign Cliff Lee when you’ve get those kind of numbers from one of your starters?

“It’s kind of all or nothing,” Lewis said of his postseason mind-set. “You go out there, and you don’t know if you’re going to get the ball again. You let it all hang out, and whatever happens, happens. You can’t worry about the what-ifs.”

The fact that Lewis will be making his third road start on Thursday in St. Louis also is no coincidence. He’s been far better on the road this season (9-5, 3.43) than at Rangers Ballpark (5-5, 5.54).

“Weather, stadiums, everything — you just adapt to it, and go have fun,” Lewis said.

Editor’s note: Tony DeMarco is a regular columnist for who has been covering the big leagues since 1987. He’ll contribute to during the World Series.