Aaron Gleeman

allen craig getty

Allen Craig clears waivers after being dropped from 40-man roster, stays with Red Sox at Triple-A


First baseman/outfielder Allen Craig and his contract predictably cleared waivers after being designated for assignment by the Red Sox. He’ll stay with the organization at Triple-A, but is no longer on the 40-man roster.

The procedural move gives the Red Sox some 40-man roster wiggle room while they try to get Craig back on track in the minors. If he convinces them he’s ready to contribute positively in the majors again they can simply re-add him to the 40-man roster and call him up.

Craig was an All-Star for the Cardinals in 2013, but he’s been a mess since then and has hit just .130 in 53 games for the Red Sox. Few hitters in recent memory have gone from All-Star caliber to a totally lost cause quicker than Craig, but he’s signed through 2017 and owed another $25 million or so.

Brewers GM Doug Melvin’s rant about Scooter Gennett and stat-heads looks really, really silly now

Doug Melvin AP

This morning the last-place Brewers demoted their starting second baseman since mid-2013, Scooter Gennett, to Triple-A because he hit .154 in 20 games this year after coming into the season as a career .300 hitter.

What makes the move particularly odd is that less than 12 months ago Brewers general manager Doug Melvin used Gennett’s success in the majors as an example to aggressively criticize stat-heads, angrily telling Bill Madden of the New York Daily News:

Melvin, an old school GM who values scouts over Ivy League whiz kid stat geeks, thinks his NL Central-leading Brewers deserve a little more respect from the Sabermetrics crowd.

“There’s this one guy,” Melvin was saying by phone Friday, “who rates the prospects in every organization, and last year labeled Scooter Gennett ‘just a backup utility player.’ Well, Scooter’s only hit nothing but .300 since last year and been one of our most important players this year and yet, when the guy was asked about him again last week, he repeated the same thing; that he thought he was nothing more than a ‘backup utility player.'”

“Why can’t these (stat) guys ever admit they’re wrong? A lot of them don’t even watch the games. But then everything has changed so much in baseball. Everything now has to be immediate. We live in a world of Instagrams when, more than any other sport, the most important thing in baseball is that you’ve got to be patient.”


Let’s set aside his use of the always hilariously off base “a lot them don’t even watch games” cliche and focus on Melvin’s quotes about how “the most important thing in baseball is that you’ve got to be patient.” You know, “patient” like demoting your multi-year starting second baseman to Triple-A because he had a bad 20 games the season after you used his hitting .300 as a way to rip into the people who doubted his upside.

Perhaps the GM will take this opportunity to “admit he’s wrong” and apologize to the unnamed “this guy” who had the gall to question Gennett. I’m guessing he won’t. Something tells me Melvin also won’t be telling many newspaper columnists the “Brewers deserve a little more respect from the sabermetrics crowd” for a while. Since that Melvin quote was published in the New York Daily News the Brewers have a 44-73 record.

Melvin has been the Brewers’ general manager since 2003. During that time Milwaukee has a 969-1,012 (.489) record with five managers and two playoff appearances in 13 years.

Josh Hamilton expected to make season debut for Rangers next week

Josh Hamilton

Josh Hamilton is “clearly making progress” and will likely make his season debut for the Rangers early next week, general manager Jon Daniels told the Associated Press.

Hamilton has been playing at Double-A and Triple-A, basically treating it as spring training after February shoulder surgery followed by alcohol and drug relapses led to a trade from the Angels.

Daniels pegged the Rangers’ series against the Indians that begins next Monday as the “more likely” return date for Hamilton, who won an MVP award for Texas in 2010.

Hamilton had back-to-back disappointing seasons for the Angels, but his .741 OPS during that time was still slightly above the MLB average and as recently as 2012 he hit .285 with 43 homers and a .930 OPS in 148 games for the Rangers to finish fifth in the MVP voting.

With the Angels paying nearly all the money Hamilton is owed the Rangers have decided he’s worth taking a low-cost flier on and we’re about to start finding out if it was a smart move.