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And That Happened: Saturday’s Scores and Highlights

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Here are the rest of Saturday’s scores and highlights:

White Sox 5, Blue Jays 2: The White Sox extended their winning streak to three games on Saturday, bolstered by six solid innings from Mike Pelfrey and three home runs from Todd Frazier, Matt Davidson and Jose Abreu. Frazier tacked on an insurance run in the eighth inning, capitalizing on a fielding error by Josh Donaldson to put the Sox up 4-2, while Yolmer Sanchez delivered a sac bunt for the fifth and final run of the game.

Indians 9, Twins 3 (Game 1): The Twins relinquished first place to the Indians, tying their division rivals at the top of the AL Central standings after their first loss of Saturday’s doubleheader. Jose Ramirez and Bradley Zimmer combined for eight of the Indians’ nine RBI, a performance that was highlighted by Ramirez’s first-inning home run off of Adam Wilk and Zimmer’s line drive double in the third.

Indians 6, Twins 2 (Game 2): After a short break between games, during which the Twins kept busy by signing first-round draft pick Royce Lewis, the Indians cemented their first-place status with another win. Mike Clevinger went 4 1/3 innings before the teams entered a one-hour rain delay, distributing two hits and a run and striking out four of 15 batters. At the plate, the Twins struck first on a Joe Mauer double in the third inning, but the Indians responded in full force, lashing four home runs to gain a four-run advantage.

Rockies 5, Giants 1: Sometimes, it’s not the quality of hits that matters, but the quantity. The Rockies racked up 13 singles and one double during their five-run rout of the Giants, forcing opposing starter Matt Cain to exit after just five frames, nine hits and two runs. Kyle Freeland, meanwhile, went a full six innings for his eighth win of the year, and survived a scary moment when he took a line drive off of his left forearm in the third inning:

Diamondbacks 5, Phillies 1: Jerad Eickhoff was having a pretty good night, all things considered. He outlasted the Diamondbacks’ Zack Godley, tossing six frames on five hits and one run, and appeared to be in line for his first win of the season. That all changed in the seventh inning, when the D-backs pounced on relievers Edubray Ramirez and Casey Fien for a four-run lead that proved insurmountable. With the loss, the Phillies are now just 1-10 in their last 11 games.

Athletics 5, Yankees 2: Ryon Healy may not be drawing the same kind of attention lavished on sluggers like Aaron Judge or Eric Thames, but he’s creeping up on their home run totals after completing his third multi-homer game of the month. He went 3-for-4 on Saturday, connecting twice for his 16th and 17th blasts of the season.

His first home run came courtesy of a 1-2 cutter from Masahiro Tanaka, knotting the score 2-2 in the second inning:

His second, a 3-2 solo shot in the fourth, propelled the A’s past the Yankees with a one-run lead:

Orioles 15, Cardinals 7: Adam Wainwright didn’t stand a chance against the Orioles. The Cardinals’ right-hander issued back-to-back runs to Adam Jones and Mark Trumbo in the first inning, which looked like child’s play compared to the seven-run spread that awaited him in the second inning. Baltimore lost little time establishing a lead, collecting five hits, two walks and seven runs off of Wainwright before he was forced off the mound. Unfortunately for the Cardinals, the bullpen fared little better in Wainwright’s absence, handing over another four runs before the game’s 15-7 conclusion.

Dodgers 10, Reds 2: The Reds are 5-13 against NL West opponents this season, thanks in no small part to their current eight-game losing streak against the Dodgers and Rockies. Saturday’s game was the worst of the eight losses, led by a five-run third inning and a rare two-homer effort from Yasiel Puig. With the win, the Dodgers maintained their second-place status in the division, just on the heels of the 45-26 Rockies.

Braves 8, Marlins 7 (10 innings): The Freeze rebounded for another win on Saturday night, an omen of good luck as the Braves stormed back from a 7-5 deficit to clinch their 30th win of the season in extras. More exciting than Matt Adams‘ four-RBI night, Nick Markakisgame-tying double and Brandon Phillipswalk-off base hit in the 10th? This postgame interview with the Marlins’ Dee Gordon, who discussed a potential race against the Braves’ racing phenom… even one without the standard 200-foot head start.

Padres 7, Brewers 5 (11 innings): The Padres prevailed in extras for their 28th win of the season, capping an impressive start by rookie right-hander Dinelson Lamet. Lamet fired 12 strikeouts over six innings, allowing four hits and three runs — one of which was an inside-the-park home run by Brewers’ shortstop Orlando Arcia.

According to MLB.com’s Adam McCalvy, Lamet pitched his way into the history books, becoming just the 22nd rookie hurler to set down 12+ strikeouts within his first five career games in the majors.

Rays 3, Tigers 2: A pitcher’s duel can have only one victor, as the Tigers’ Michael Fulmer discovered the hard way on Saturday. He went toe-to-toe against the Rays’ Chris Archer for four scoreless frames, but lost some of his edge in the fifth inning, surrendering an RBI base hit to Daniel Robertson and allowing another two runs in the seventh on Robertson’s second RBI single and a go-ahead base hit from Mallex Smith.

Nationals 7, Mets 4: After going 1-5 in their last two series, the Nationals are back on top with a three-game win streak against the Mets. Another three-home run effort solidified their lead on Saturday, powered by blasts from Trea Turner, Jose Lobaton and Adam Lind and a five-strikeout performance from Stephen Strasburg.

Rangers 10, Mariners 4: The Rangers may still be a distant second to the 46-23 Astros, but you wouldn’t know it by their dominant run this past week. They’re 7-1 against the Nationals, Astros and Mariners, putting up consecutive 10-4 wins in Seattle to stay one step ahead of the third-place Angels. On Saturday, they got things started with a five-run first inning, highlighted by Mike Napoli‘s two-out homer off of Yovani Gallardo:

The Mariners made a good-faith effort to catch up with an RBI double from Taylor Motter and Mike Zunino’s seventh home run of the year, but it wasn’t enough to overtake their rivals, who returned in the sixth with another five-run spread on three homers from Napoli, Rougned Odor and Shin-Soo Choo.

Astros 7, Red Sox 1: The Astros coasted to a much-needed win on Saturday, banking on six solid innings from rookie right-hander David Paulino. Paulino fanned four of 21 batters, holding the Red Sox to just three hits and one run to clinch his first big league win. Helping matters was the seven runs of support he received from a blistering offensive drive, featuring the Astros’ three-run first inning, home runs from Jose Altuve and Carlos Beltran and a run-scoring double play by Norichika Aoki.

Altuve’s blast crowned the Astros’ impressive run, measuring an estimated 428 feet and ricocheting off the train in left field:

Pirates 4, Cubs 3: The Cubs took a tough loss to their division rival on Saturday night, one that Jake Arrieta later pinned on the high humidity at PNC Park. The heat caused Chicago’s ace to sweat profusely, making the ball too slippery to find consistency within the strike zone. He exited in the fifth inning after loading the bases on a hit by pitch, and issued two wild pitches during his abbreviated start.

It wasn’t all bad news for Arrieta and the Cubs, however. The right-hander struck out the side in the second, registering seven strikeouts before making an early exit. At the plate, he logged his second home run of the year off of opposing starter Ivan Nova, skying it 380 feet into the left field bleachers to put the Cubs on the board in the fifth:

Angels 9, Royals 0: Don’t look now, but Cameron Maybin has a pretty nifty streak going. The Angels’ outfielder has reached base safely in 22 consecutive games, bringing his season batting line to a comfortable .267/.375/.408 through 224 PA. He kicked things off on Saturday with a first-pitch home run off of Jake Junis in the first inning:

Maybin wasn’t the only Angel to earn recognition for his prowess at the plate. Albert Pujols went 3-for-4 against the Royals and smashed a two-run homer in the fifth inning, earning his 1,865th career RBI — good for tenth-most among all past and present major league hitters.

And That Happened: Tuesday’s Scores and Highlights

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Obviously the big story last night was Reds left fielder Scooter Gennett hitting four homers and driving in ten runs as the Reds romped over the Cardinals. 13-1. That was pretty random, eh? Gennett, coming in to last night only had 38 homers in his entire four year career, and then he uncorks that crazy night. I love how random baseball can be sometimes.

My personal preference is to just let weirdness be weirdness when it comes to baseball oddities like that. You can’t predict them so you probably should just let it all pleasantly wash over you rather than StatCast it and analyze it to death. We’re all gonna remember Scooter Freakin’ Gennett as a guy who hit four homers in a game, much like the way we remember Mark Whiten and a couple of others for that. Barring an MVP Award or something, this will be his legacy and it’s a damn fine one to have, so who cares what the launch angle was, you know?

Of course, we are in the baseball content business here, so we’ll take some extra looks at the feat. Here is Bill’s look at the significance of it all, statistically speaking, from last night. You can see all four of the homers here:

 

My final take on it: last night, just after Gennett hit his fourth homer, I was goofing around on Twitter with a couple of friends, imagining how such a rare and spectacular feat might be described by the player after the game. We joked that they’d still use the same cliches. Like this:

Here’s what Gennett actually said:

Baseball: it’s always there for us, never changing in an increasingly chaotic and ever-changing world. God bless ballplayers, everywhere. God bless their executed pitches, good pitches to hit and their lack of a desire to press and do too much out there, even when they do superhuman things.

Here are the scores, here are the highlights:

Reds 13, Cardinals 1: Lost in Gennett’s night is the fact that Reds starter Tim Adleman shut the Cards down, allowing only one run over seven innings and that Adam Wainwright, who gave up only one homer, the grand slam, to Gennett, got shelled for nine runs overall in less than four innings. Certainly not a night the Cardinals are gonna want to think about for long.

Red Sox 5, Yankees 4: The Red Sox and Yankees play a game that can go right up there with their classic rivalry games from 15 years ago. Not because the game was fantastic, but because it took over three and a half hours for them to play it despite there being only 15 hits between the two teams. Mitch MorelandHanley Ramirez and Andrew Benintendi all hit homers off of Masahiro Tanaka, who continues to struggle mightily and is probably due for a DL stint with one of those phantom injuries like the one Bartolo Colon was given yesterday. Craig Kimbrel closed the game out by striking out five batters in an inning and a third thanks to one of them reaching on a wild pitch. Kimbrel has been mind-bogglingly good lately. He’s retired 80 batters on the year. Fifty-three of those 80 were retired via strikeout. He’s on a pace to strike out 151 guys. Last year that would’ve put him in 25th place in the American League in strikeouts. This from a guy who pitches one inning a night. Mercy.

Orioles 6, Pirates 5: The Pirates led late but Jonathan Schoop tied it in the ninth with his second homer of the game — we call that a half-Scooter in the biz — and Mark Trumbo singled home a run in the 10th to complete the comeback.

Angels 5, Tigers 3: The Angels had a 4-0 lead mid-game, the Tigers crept back in and tried to rally in the ninth but Bud Norris stopped the bleeding. But just barely. The Tigers loaded the bases with two outs and Norris fell behind 3-0 to Alex Avila. He managed to strike Avila out though, with Avila getting caught looking at strike three. Phew. Kole Calhoun and C.J. Cron homered for the Angels.

White Sox 4, Rays 2Avisail Garcia, Yolmer Sanchez and Todd Frazier homered for the White Sox (a collective .75Gennett, per StatCast or whatever) as they snap a five-game losing streak. Jose Quintana was solid after tossing complete stink bombs in his previous two outings.

Phillies 3, Braves 1: Aaron Nola allowed one run on five hits over eight innings. Odubel Herrera doubled in the go-ahead run in the sixth and then came around to score on a balk later in the inning. Someone in the Spanish-speaking press should ask Mike Schmidt for his opinions on that and then disparage him if he answers in English.

Brewers 5, Giants 2: Chase Anderson pitched seven and two-thirds shutout innings and [all together now] helped is own cause by doubling in a run in the third. Matt Cain gave up five runs on ten hits in five innings. After a solid April that had a lot of people talking about his comeback, Cain has seen his ERA climb over two and a half runs in seven starts.

Rangers 10, Mets 8: Rangers pitchers gave up five homers — and Jay Bruce almost hit another one, only to have it robbed by Jared Hoying — to the Mets but their hitters bailed ’em out by rattling off ten runs on 16 hits. Joey Gallo‘s 17th homer on the year came in the third inning, making it 5-4 Texas. There was a lot more scoring to come, but that put the Rangers up for good in this one.

Cubs 10, Marlins 2: Jake Arrieta pitched two-hit ball into the seventh and Anthony Rizzo drove in four as the Cubs win their fifth in a row. That comes on the heels of six straight losses. Streaky.

Royals 9, Astros 7: Speaking of streaks, the Astros’ 11-game run is now over thanks to Mike Moustakas‘ two-run shot with two outs in the ninth to help Kansas City rally back from a six-run deficit. On any other morning we slap Moustakas’ face up at the top of this post.

Rockies 11, Indians 3: Rockies starter Antonio Senzatela hit a three-run double in the second inning and was steady into the seventh inning as the Rockies romped. Mark Reynolds hit two homers and drove in five.

Diamondbacks 10, Padres 2: Robbie Ray continues his torrid run, striking out 11 Padres batters and allowing just one run while pitching into the seventh. Jake Lamb drove in four and Chris Owings knocked in three.

Athletics 4, Blue Jays 1: Jesse Hahn was activated from the DL and came in to allow only an unearned run in six innings. Khris Davis knocked in two and Ryon Healy hit an RBI.

Mariners 12, Twins 3Robinson Cano and Kyle Seager each hit three-run homers as the M’s stay hot, winning their eighth game in nine tries. All that offense made up for a mediocre James Paxton start.

Nationals 2, Dodgers 1: Death taxes and Max Scherzer striking out a bunch of dudes. Here he allowed only an unearned run in seven innings and struck out 14 Dodgers batters. His K-totals in his last three starts: 14, 11 and 13. He’s started 12 games this year. He’s struck out ten or more guys in half of them.

And That Happened: Thursday’s Scores and Highlights

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Here are the scores. Here are the highlights:

Cardinals 2, Dodgers 0: For once the pitcher win truly meant something as Adam Wainwright tossed six shutout innings and hit a two-run homer for the only runs in the game. Wainwright is working on a scoreless innings streak of 16.1 and has seen his ERA drop to 3.79 after posting a 6.11 mark in April. Meanwhile, Brandon McCarthy of the Dodgers had to leave after four innings due to blisters.

Indians 8, Athletics 0: Corey Kluber Struck out ten over six shutout innings in his first start since May 2 so, yeah, I think he’s fine. Meanwhile, this happened during the sixth inning:

 

If that happened the day before, Al Gore would’ve magically appeared to lecture the Indians grounds crew about wasting precious water, but as it happened about 20 minutes after Trump pulled out of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change, everyone got bonuses. What a weird world we live in. No matter the case, it didn’t cool down the Indians, who would score one more run that inning after the sprinklers came on and three more in the following inning.

Brewers 2, Mets 1: Chase Anderson pitched seven shutout innings. A batboy probably lost a job, too:

That ended up not mattering — the Mets turned a double play right after missing out on that putout — but it certainly seems like the Baseball Gods don’t want good things for New York lately.

Rockies 6, Mariners 3: Mark Reynolds and Nolan Arenado homered. The M’s saw their four game winning streak snapped but, far worse, saw Nelson Cruz and shortstop Jean Segura leave with injuries. Cruz was hit on the top of his left hand and Segura hurt his right ankle on a slide into second base. Both left the game and will undergo additional tests. Expect updates later today.

Orioles 7, Red Sox 5: Your quintessential AL East slugfest. Mark TrumboChris DavisAdam Jones and Jonathan Schoop all homered for the O’s. Jackie Bradley Jr. hit a three-run homer and Christian Vazquez drove in two for Boston. Why anyone wants to pitch in that division is beyond me.

Yankees 12, Blue Jays 2: Aaron Hicks went 4-for-5 with three doubles and drove in six runs. Gary Sanchez homered twice. CC Sabathia allowed one run while pitching into the seventh to pick up his six win. He’s on pace to go 19-6 this year and pitch 200 innings. Bet you weren’t expecting that.

Diamondbacks 3, Marlins 2: Zack Greinke allowed two runs — only one earned — and struck out eight over seven innings to pick up his seventh win of the year. Meanwhile, Nick Ahmed went 3-for-4 and drove in a couple. Greinke is 5-0 in his career against the Marlins. His comment on that:

“I’ll take that. Their team is pretty good right now. Some years it hasn’t been the best team.”

Greinke is an ace at understatement too.

Twins 4, Angels 2: The Twins turned their first triple play in 11 years. And it wasn’t the dumb kind that involved bad base running. It was a cool around-the-horn job:

 

More importantly, they rallied for three runs in the ninth inning for a comeback win, with one of the runs coming on a bases-loaded walk. Which, as far as defensive stuff goes, is kind of the exact opposite of turning a quick triple play.