Jonathan Schoop

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And That Happened: Tuesday’s Scores and Highlights

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Obviously the big story last night was Reds left fielder Scooter Gennett hitting four homers and driving in ten runs as the Reds romped over the Cardinals. 13-1. That was pretty random, eh? Gennett, coming in to last night only had 38 homers in his entire four year career, and then he uncorks that crazy night. I love how random baseball can be sometimes.

My personal preference is to just let weirdness be weirdness when it comes to baseball oddities like that. You can’t predict them so you probably should just let it all pleasantly wash over you rather than StatCast it and analyze it to death. We’re all gonna remember Scooter Freakin’ Gennett as a guy who hit four homers in a game, much like the way we remember Mark Whiten and a couple of others for that. Barring an MVP Award or something, this will be his legacy and it’s a damn fine one to have, so who cares what the launch angle was, you know?

Of course, we are in the baseball content business here, so we’ll take some extra looks at the feat. Here is Bill’s look at the significance of it all, statistically speaking, from last night. You can see all four of the homers here:

 

My final take on it: last night, just after Gennett hit his fourth homer, I was goofing around on Twitter with a couple of friends, imagining how such a rare and spectacular feat might be described by the player after the game. We joked that they’d still use the same cliches. Like this:

Here’s what Gennett actually said:

Baseball: it’s always there for us, never changing in an increasingly chaotic and ever-changing world. God bless ballplayers, everywhere. God bless their executed pitches, good pitches to hit and their lack of a desire to press and do too much out there, even when they do superhuman things.

Here are the scores, here are the highlights:

Reds 13, Cardinals 1: Lost in Gennett’s night is the fact that Reds starter Tim Adleman shut the Cards down, allowing only one run over seven innings and that Adam Wainwright, who gave up only one homer, the grand slam, to Gennett, got shelled for nine runs overall in less than four innings. Certainly not a night the Cardinals are gonna want to think about for long.

Red Sox 5, Yankees 4: The Red Sox and Yankees play a game that can go right up there with their classic rivalry games from 15 years ago. Not because the game was fantastic, but because it took over three and a half hours for them to play it despite there being only 15 hits between the two teams. Mitch MorelandHanley Ramirez and Andrew Benintendi all hit homers off of Masahiro Tanaka, who continues to struggle mightily and is probably due for a DL stint with one of those phantom injuries like the one Bartolo Colon was given yesterday. Craig Kimbrel closed the game out by striking out five batters in an inning and a third thanks to one of them reaching on a wild pitch. Kimbrel has been mind-bogglingly good lately. He’s retired 80 batters on the year. Fifty-three of those 80 were retired via strikeout. He’s on a pace to strike out 151 guys. Last year that would’ve put him in 25th place in the American League in strikeouts. This from a guy who pitches one inning a night. Mercy.

Orioles 6, Pirates 5: The Pirates led late but Jonathan Schoop tied it in the ninth with his second homer of the game — we call that a half-Scooter in the biz — and Mark Trumbo singled home a run in the 10th to complete the comeback.

Angels 5, Tigers 3: The Angels had a 4-0 lead mid-game, the Tigers crept back in and tried to rally in the ninth but Bud Norris stopped the bleeding. But just barely. The Tigers loaded the bases with two outs and Norris fell behind 3-0 to Alex Avila. He managed to strike Avila out though, with Avila getting caught looking at strike three. Phew. Kole Calhoun and C.J. Cron homered for the Angels.

White Sox 4, Rays 2Avisail Garcia, Yolmer Sanchez and Todd Frazier homered for the White Sox (a collective .75Gennett, per StatCast or whatever) as they snap a five-game losing streak. Jose Quintana was solid after tossing complete stink bombs in his previous two outings.

Phillies 3, Braves 1: Aaron Nola allowed one run on five hits over eight innings. Odubel Herrera doubled in the go-ahead run in the sixth and then came around to score on a balk later in the inning. Someone in the Spanish-speaking press should ask Mike Schmidt for his opinions on that and then disparage him if he answers in English.

Brewers 5, Giants 2: Chase Anderson pitched seven and two-thirds shutout innings and [all together now] helped is own cause by doubling in a run in the third. Matt Cain gave up five runs on ten hits in five innings. After a solid April that had a lot of people talking about his comeback, Cain has seen his ERA climb over two and a half runs in seven starts.

Rangers 10, Mets 8: Rangers pitchers gave up five homers — and Jay Bruce almost hit another one, only to have it robbed by Jared Hoying — to the Mets but their hitters bailed ’em out by rattling off ten runs on 16 hits. Joey Gallo‘s 17th homer on the year came in the third inning, making it 5-4 Texas. There was a lot more scoring to come, but that put the Rangers up for good in this one.

Cubs 10, Marlins 2: Jake Arrieta pitched two-hit ball into the seventh and Anthony Rizzo drove in four as the Cubs win their fifth in a row. That comes on the heels of six straight losses. Streaky.

Royals 9, Astros 7: Speaking of streaks, the Astros’ 11-game run is now over thanks to Mike Moustakas‘ two-run shot with two outs in the ninth to help Kansas City rally back from a six-run deficit. On any other morning we slap Moustakas’ face up at the top of this post.

Rockies 11, Indians 3: Rockies starter Antonio Senzatela hit a three-run double in the second inning and was steady into the seventh inning as the Rockies romped. Mark Reynolds hit two homers and drove in five.

Diamondbacks 10, Padres 2: Robbie Ray continues his torrid run, striking out 11 Padres batters and allowing just one run while pitching into the seventh. Jake Lamb drove in four and Chris Owings knocked in three.

Athletics 4, Blue Jays 1: Jesse Hahn was activated from the DL and came in to allow only an unearned run in six innings. Khris Davis knocked in two and Ryon Healy hit an RBI.

Mariners 12, Twins 3Robinson Cano and Kyle Seager each hit three-run homers as the M’s stay hot, winning their eighth game in nine tries. All that offense made up for a mediocre James Paxton start.

Nationals 2, Dodgers 1: Death taxes and Max Scherzer striking out a bunch of dudes. Here he allowed only an unearned run in seven innings and struck out 14 Dodgers batters. His K-totals in his last three starts: 14, 11 and 13. He’s started 12 games this year. He’s struck out ten or more guys in half of them.

And That Happened: Thursday’s Scores and Highlights

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Here are the scores. Here are the highlights:

Cardinals 2, Dodgers 0: For once the pitcher win truly meant something as Adam Wainwright tossed six shutout innings and hit a two-run homer for the only runs in the game. Wainwright is working on a scoreless innings streak of 16.1 and has seen his ERA drop to 3.79 after posting a 6.11 mark in April. Meanwhile, Brandon McCarthy of the Dodgers had to leave after four innings due to blisters.

Indians 8, Athletics 0: Corey Kluber Struck out ten over six shutout innings in his first start since May 2 so, yeah, I think he’s fine. Meanwhile, this happened during the sixth inning:

 

If that happened the day before, Al Gore would’ve magically appeared to lecture the Indians grounds crew about wasting precious water, but as it happened about 20 minutes after Trump pulled out of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change, everyone got bonuses. What a weird world we live in. No matter the case, it didn’t cool down the Indians, who would score one more run that inning after the sprinklers came on and three more in the following inning.

Brewers 2, Mets 1: Chase Anderson pitched seven shutout innings. A batboy probably lost a job, too:

That ended up not mattering — the Mets turned a double play right after missing out on that putout — but it certainly seems like the Baseball Gods don’t want good things for New York lately.

Rockies 6, Mariners 3: Mark Reynolds and Nolan Arenado homered. The M’s saw their four game winning streak snapped but, far worse, saw Nelson Cruz and shortstop Jean Segura leave with injuries. Cruz was hit on the top of his left hand and Segura hurt his right ankle on a slide into second base. Both left the game and will undergo additional tests. Expect updates later today.

Orioles 7, Red Sox 5: Your quintessential AL East slugfest. Mark TrumboChris DavisAdam Jones and Jonathan Schoop all homered for the O’s. Jackie Bradley Jr. hit a three-run homer and Christian Vazquez drove in two for Boston. Why anyone wants to pitch in that division is beyond me.

Yankees 12, Blue Jays 2: Aaron Hicks went 4-for-5 with three doubles and drove in six runs. Gary Sanchez homered twice. CC Sabathia allowed one run while pitching into the seventh to pick up his six win. He’s on pace to go 19-6 this year and pitch 200 innings. Bet you weren’t expecting that.

Diamondbacks 3, Marlins 2: Zack Greinke allowed two runs — only one earned — and struck out eight over seven innings to pick up his seventh win of the year. Meanwhile, Nick Ahmed went 3-for-4 and drove in a couple. Greinke is 5-0 in his career against the Marlins. His comment on that:

“I’ll take that. Their team is pretty good right now. Some years it hasn’t been the best team.”

Greinke is an ace at understatement too.

Twins 4, Angels 2: The Twins turned their first triple play in 11 years. And it wasn’t the dumb kind that involved bad base running. It was a cool around-the-horn job:

 

More importantly, they rallied for three runs in the ninth inning for a comeback win, with one of the runs coming on a bases-loaded walk. Which, as far as defensive stuff goes, is kind of the exact opposite of turning a quick triple play.

And That Happened: Monday’s Scores and Highlights

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Here are the scores. Here are the highlights:

Astros 16, Twins 8: Most of the time, if you take an 8-2 lead into the eighth inning, you’re gonna win that game. But just most of the time. Some of the time your bullpen is gonna give up 14 runs in the final two innings like Minnesota’s did here. Eleven of those runs came in the eighth, thanks to eight hits, two walks, a hit batter and a balk. Two of those eighth inning hits were from Carlos Beltran who singled and later hit a three-run homer. The Twins played a 15-inning game on Sunday so that pen was taxed already, but this was kinda ridiculous. Houston has won five in a row and has the best record in baseball.

Nationals 3, Giants 0: Fisticuffsmanship! As you’ve seen by now, Bryce Harper charged the mound and tussled with Giants reliever Hunter Strickland after getting hit by a pitch in the eighth inning and both were ejected. What you may not have seen is just how “nah, not my problem” Buster Posey and Strickland’s teammates were about it all when Harper went after their man:

After the game Posey said he wasn’t going to get into the middle of a bunch of big guys tumbling around, but you have to figure that part of it was disapproval of Strickland plunking Harper over what seems to be a three-year old grudge over Harper hitting a couple of homers off of him him in the playoffs. Which is about as immature as it gets. A close second on the immaturity scale: Strickland having to be dragged off the field by his teammates like he was:

You have to figure that a lot of Giants vets are not too pleased with Hunter Strickland this morning.

White Sox 5, Red Sox 4: Melky Cabrera hit a three-run homer and knocked in a fourth run — the go-ahead run — with an infield single in the seventh. For Boston, David Price made his season debut and was meh, allowing three runs in five innings. Dustin Pedroia sprained his wrist and is heading back to Boston for tests. In other news, while I am aware that David Price and Dustin Pedroia are big stars and the events surrounding them in this game is news, it is rather odd to read a game story about a White Sox win in which a White Sox player drives in four runs and not have a single mention of the White Sox until the seventh paragraph. 

Dodgers 5, Cardinals 1: Rich Hill made his second straight start against the Cardinals. This one went better than the last one, in which he gave up five runs in four innings. Here he allowed only one run on two hits over five. He’s still not super efficient as he’s trying to adjust his mechanics to accommodate his blister issues, but he was effective. In other news, I was watching this one with my wife. Chase Utley comes to the plate and we talk about him some. I say something to the effect of “he’s been heating up lately, but I think he’s kind of toast at this point.” Literally four seconds after I finish the thought Utley hit a homer. Cody Bellinger and Logan Forsythe homered too, but their timing wasn’t as good.

Mariners 6, Rockies 5: It’s not often that you use seven pitchers in a game and still win it, but that’s what Seattle did with rookie Sam Gaviglio and six of his friends getting it done, more or less. They had help from Danny Valencia, who had three hits and Kyle Seager who knocked in two with a double.

Orioles 3, Yankees 2: The O’s snap a seven-game slide thanks to seven strong innings from Dylan Bundy and a couple of runs knocked in by Jonathan Schoop.

Pirates 4, Diamondbacks 3Chris Iannetta of the Dbacks tied the game in the top of the ninth with a two-run homer to left off Pirates closer Tony Watson, but then Andrew McCutchen led off the bottom of the ninth with a walkoff homer. From deflating to elating in the space of mere minutes.

Indians 5, Athletics 3: Carlos Carrasco took a shutout into the seventh and ended up allowing two runs while striking out seven over seven. The Tribe got homers from Austin Jackson, Carlos Santana and Edwin Encarnacion. Encarnacion is hitting .348 and has three homers in the past week, so people freaking out about that signing being a bust can relax some.

Mets 4, Brewers 2: Robert Gsellman allowed two runs — only one earned — over seven innings. He also drove in one via a sac fly in the fifth and another by drawing a walk with the bases loaded in the sixth. That walk was issued by Milwaukee reliever Rob Scahill, who just prior hit a guy to load the bases. The run from the walk wasn’t charged to Scahill, who wasn’t the guy who put the guy who scored on base, but boy howdy that’s some less-than-stellar relief work.

Padres 5, Cubs 2: Hunter Renfroe hit a grand slam that helped send the Cubs to their fourth straight loss. Weird stat: the Cubs had only three hits but they drew 10 walks and had two batters hit by pitches. Only scoring two runs with fifteen base runners to work with is bad, but so is a team allowing 15 bases runners in that fashion. Even in victory the Padres make you smack your head.

Tigers 10, Royals 7: The Tigers’ late rally wasn’t as impressive as Houston’s, but they were down 7-6 in the eighth and put up a four-spot. Miguel Cabrera hit a two-run single that inning and reached base four times. One of the times came when he walked with the bases loaded in a six-run Detroit fifth inning.

Blue Jays 17, Reds 2: This was a bloodbath. Troy Tulowitzki hit a grand slam, Justin Smoak hit a three-run homer and Russell Martin added a two-run shot. Toronto had 23 hits. Their franchise record for hits in a game is 25, which came against Texas back in 1999.

Marlins 4, Phillies 1: Edinson Volquez got his first win of the season after seven losses, allowing one run and three hits in six innings. Derek Dietrich hit a two-run homer and Dee Gordon and Giancarlo Stanton each drove in a run.

Rays 10, Rangers 8Tim Beckham hit a go-ahead three-run homer in the Rays’ five-run seventh inning. Colby Rasmus hit a two-run double in that same frame. Steven Souza had four hits and scored four times.

Braves 6, Angels 3Matt Adams and Danny Santana each had two-run doubles during Atlanta’s six-run third inning. The Angels were probably catatonic anyway, as they learned before the game yesterday that they’re going to be without Mike Trout for an extended period. Dead Team Walking.