Edwin Diaz

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And That Happened: Saturday’s Scores and Highlights

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Here are the rest of Saturday’s scores and highlights:

Yankees 5, Brewers 3: Clint Frazier couldn’t have picked a better time to show the Yankees he’s capable of handling major league responsibilities. The rookie outfielder went 3-for-4 at the plate on Saturday, recording a single, RBI triple and his first career walk-off home run against Milwaukee’s Corey Knebel:

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Frazier is the youngest Yankee to belt a walk-off homer since Melky Cabrera did it for the club in 2006 and the fourth-youngest to do so in franchise history (via ESPN Stats and Info).

Blue Jays 7, Astros 2: We could talk about Evan Gattis10-game hitting streak. We could dissect Josh Donaldson‘s highlight reel-worthy pirouette to turn a double play. Or we could just watch the season’s prettiest slider looping on a GIF forever:

Orioles 5, Twins 1: Miguel Sano mashed his 21st home run of the season on Saturday, putting the team on the board with their first and only run in a loss to the Orioles. With the knock, Sano became the fourth Twins’ player to hit at least 21 home runs before the All-Star break, joining former Twins Harmon Killebrew (1961, 1964, 1967, 1969 and 1970), Kent Hrbek (1987) and Justin Morneau (2007 and 2009).

Braves 13, Nationals 0: The Nationals were shut out for the first time this season, suffering a 13-run deficit at the hands of right-hander Julio Teheran and an electric run by the Braves’ offense. Teheran went seven strong, limiting the Nats to four hits and two walks and striking out five of 28 batters. Nick Markakis, Kurt Suzuki, Ender Inciarte and Julio Teheran each drove in at least two runs, which marked the first two-hit game of Teheran’s season and the eighth of his career to date. Per ESPN Stats and Info, the Yankees are the only remaining team that has not yet been shut out this year.

Rays 1, Red Sox 0: Rick Porcello took his first complete game loss against the Rays, stymieing their offense through eight innings on one run, six hits and seven strikeouts. Tampa Bay catcher Jesus Sucre capitalized on a precarious situation in the second inning and drove in the team’s first run with a sac fly to score Steven Souza Jr. It was the fifth time in club history that the Rays won 1-0 on a sacrifice fly, and the first time since 2007 that they managed to do so against the Red Sox.

Indians 4, Tigers 0: The Indians boosted their lead to two full games in the AL Central with a shutout over the Tigers this weekend, spearheaded by Mike Clevinger in his third consecutive win. Michael Brantley was tasked with spoiling Justin Verlander‘s own shutout attempt and lashed an RBI double in the fifth to put the Indians up 1-0. The only dampener on the game? The untimely loss of second baseman Jason Kipnis, who was forced to exit in the third inning after sustaining a right hamstring strain.

Padres 2, Phillies 1: Rick Porcello and Justin Verlander weren’t the only pitchers to suffer from low run support on Saturday. The Phillies’ Aaron Nola turned in a masterful performance against the Padres, setting down eight innings of two-run ball and matching a season-high nine strikeouts. A pitcher’s duel is only effective with adequate run support, however, and Nola’s best efforts were ultimately unraveled by Austin Hedgesgo-ahead RBI single in the seventh.

Dodgers 5, Royals 4 (10 innings): It took a 10th-inning bases-loaded walk from Cody Bellinger to seal the deal, but the Dodgers finally grabbed hold of their 60th win on Saturday night. Brandon McCarthy shined in his first start off the disabled list, holding the Royals to two runs and striking out one of 24 batters through the first six innings of the game. Ian Kennedy held his own with three runs and seven strikeouts in six innings, but it was Kelvin Herrera‘s unfortunately-placed slider that sunk the Royals in the end.

Pirates 4, Cubs 2: Sometimes, it’s all about taking the time to recognize the small victories. Kyle Schwarber went back-to-back with Ian Happ in the fourth inning of Saturday’s loss to the Pirates, his first home run since he was recalled from Triple-A Iowa on Thursday. The feat may not have been rewarded with a win, but it didn’t go unnoticed:

The Pirates, on the other hand, pulled within seven games of the division lead, though they still have a ways to go if they plan to overtake the Cardinals, Cubs or Brewers.

Cardinals 4, Mets 1: It took Paul DeJong five pitches to solve Zack Wheeler and just four at-bats to prove that his hot streak is here to stay. The rookie shortstop made franchise history as the first shortstop to go 4-for-4 with four extras bases in a game, mashing his eighth home run and tacking on three doubles and two RBI to power the Cardinals through their 42nd win. Adam Wainwright complemented the rookie’s efforts with one of his strongest outings of the season, quashing the Mets’ efforts with five hits, one run and seven strikeouts through 6 2/3 frames.

Rangers 5, Angels 2: Adrian Beltre sure looked spiffy on Saturday night, sporting a 1977 throwback uniform as he muscled his way higher on the all-time home run and RBI lists. He helped the Rangers to a two-run lead in the third inning with a first-pitch home run, depositing it just over the left field wall for his 452nd career homer and 1,598th career RBI.

With the blast, he now sits at 38th overall on the all-time home run list, tied only with Carl Yastrzemski, and 36th on the all-time RBI list. He’ll need six more home runs to supersede Miguel Cabrera for second-most career knocks by an active major leaguer.

White Sox 5, Rockies 4: Jose Quintana may not be thinking about the trade deadline right now, but a three-run, 10-strikeout performance undeniably upped his trade value on Saturday. The White Sox’ hurler pitched to his sixth no-decision of the year, reaching double-digit strikeouts in just 5 1/3 innings against a Rockies’ offense that currently ranks sixth-last among major league teams.

Quintana helped his own cause, too, driving in a run on a sac fly in the fourth inning to help the Sox tie the Tigers for last place in the AL Central.

Marlins 5, Giants 4: While Barry Bonds was honored on the Wall of Fame with a commemorative plaque and a touching speech from Hall of Famer Willie Mays, the Giants couldn’t quite do justice to their former slugger on the field. They tagged rookie starter Chris O’Grady for three runs in the first six innings, but fell short in the ninth when Joe Panik‘s two-out rally fizzled out with Hunter Pence‘s game-ending, three-pitch strikeout.

Reds 7, Diamondbacks 0: Taijuan Walker didn’t stand a chance against the Reds’ offense, which jumped out to a sizable lead with five runs through the first five innings of Saturday’s win. Backed by 6 2/3 flawless innings from rookie right-hander Luis Castillo, three stolen bases by professional speedster Billy Hamilton and Joey Votto‘s 27th home run (good for most homers in a non-Aaron Judge league), the Reds clinched their first win of the series and improved to 38 wins on the year.

Athletics 4, Mariners 3: On a night when 36-year-old right-hander Chris Smith became the oldest starting pitcher to debut with the Athletics, the club looked as sprightly as ever. Smith logged six innings of three-run ball, Yonder Alonso mashed his 20th home run and Marcus Semien picked up his first homer of the year. The Mariners kept pace with their division rivals until the ninth, when Ryon Healy pounced on an 0-2 slider from Edwin Diaz and laced a game-winning ground-rule double into right field.

And That Happened: Tuesday’s Scores and Highlights

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Here are the scores. Here are the highlights:

Seems like every game is nothing but a homer fest anymore. Baseball is nothing but dingers now. I wonder if chicks are gettin’ a bit tired of the longball.

Braves 9, Blue Jays 5Dansby Swanson hit a homer in the seventh inning, breaking a 5-all tie and helping the Braves take both games of the two-game set. Freddie Freeman went 2-for-4, walked and hit another homer, his 14th on the year. Overall the NL East may be the worst division, but it’s got the three best hitters in the NL so far this year with Freeman, Bryce Harper and Ryan Zimmerman.

Nationals 8, Pirates 4: Speaking of Harper and Zimmerman, the former went 2-for-4 with a homer and the latter doubled in two. Harper’s homer almost landed in the Allegheny River. After the game he said this:

“I don’t worry about hitting the ball in the water,” Harper said. “Matt [Williams] used to say, ‘It’s not how far. It’s how many.’ Just trying to put the ball in play, and sometimes it goes over the fence.”

Matt Williams was a great player, but man he seems kind of boring.

Rays 6, Indians 4: The Rays hit five homers in all. Corey Dickerson hit two of them, one of them went 450 feet. After the game Dickerson took issue with that estimate and said he thought it went farther than 450. Guess he never met Matt Williams. Danny Salazar gave up four of the homers. No word if he thinks that “you just have to tip your cap” to the Rays hitters.

Orioles 13, Tigers 11: An extra innings homer is pretty special. Chris Davis hit two of them. He led off the 12th with a solo shot as the O’s scored three. The Tigers matched those three runs in the bottom half, however, giving Davis another chance. In the 13th he hit a two-run drive to give the O’s their winning margin. OK, maybe Matt Williams was right about that whole quantity thing. In other news, the Orioles led 7-1 after three innings, only to squander that lead and then some, requiring a Mark Trumbo homer in the ninth to force extras. Seven total dingers in this game. J.D. Martinez drove in five in a losing cause.

Astros 12, Marlins 4: A huge early lead allowed Dallas Keuchel to have a short, 70-pitch night and leave after five, confident that he’d go on to get his 7th win of the year. Jake Marisnick hit two two-run bombs. The Astros have the best record in baseball.

Rangers 5, Phillies 1: Yu Darvish rung up nine strikeouts in seven one-run innings, notching his 50th career win. Maybe I should say he did it in “seven inning, in which he allowed one run overall.” “Seven one-run innings” could mean he allowed one run in each of them. It reminds me of an old SNL sketch in which Ed Asner played the supervisor of a nuclear power plant who told his employees “remember, you can never put too much water in a nuclear reactor.” He leaves and they’re not sure if that means don’t put too much in or, alternatively, that it’s impossible to put too much in. Then it explodes and everyone dies. That was in the Joe Piscopo years, I believe. I realize the Dick Ebersol SNL years don’t get as much pub as the Lorne Michaels ones, but those were the first ones I watched and there was some real quality there that has been lost to history. And not just the Eddie Murphy stuff. Anyway, (a) I’m old; and (b) The Rangers have won seven in a row and, after a horrific start, have pulled to .500.

Cubs 9, Reds 5Anthony Rizzo and Kyle Schwarber homered, giving the Cubs the win. It also happened to give Joe Maddon his 1,000th career win as a manager. He celebrated by drinking wine during the press conference:

Somewhere Darren Rovell is tweeting about how much that cost the Gatorade people in forgone postgame drink visibility rights or some nonsense.

Rockies 7, Twins 3Charlie Blackmon hit a two-run homer, drove in three and had three hits on the night. The Rockies early season success is notable enough, but it’s even more notable that they’re 12-5 on the road. Somewhere Darren Rovell is tweeting about how much damage the Rockies are doing to their brand, which was forged in part on road game futility. The AP gamer contains the sentence “Phil Hughes had another disappointing outing.” At least someone is keeping on-brand.

Red Sox 6, Cardinals 3: The second of two former World Series matchups on the night (first person to name the other one in the comments wins a free HBT subscription for life). Here Mookie Betts homered and drove in two, Jackie Bradley Jr. went deep too. Eduardo Rodriguez allowed three runs and five hits. It was only the Cardinals second loss in ten games.

Yankees 7, Royals 1: CC Sabathia tossed shutout ball into the seventh. Gary Sanchez hit a three-run homer and Chris Carter hit a two-run shot. Sabathia is 13-5 in 21 career starts at Kauffman, which ties him for the most career wins there by a visiting pitcher. “I love pitching here,” Sabathia said. “It’s my favorite park.” I’m too lazy to look at which visitor has the most wins at the K. Gonna guess Verlander — has to be someone from the unbalanced schedule era, right? — but I have no idea.

UPDATE:

Diamondbacks 5, Mets 4: Nothing is going right for the Mets lately. They botched a rundown and let Paul Goldschmidt steal home in the process, so that was fun. Yasmany Tomas hit a homer in his fifth straight game against the Mets. Zack Greinke allowed four runs on five hits while striking out eight in six and two-thirds. Not great, but good enough against a team that has taken shooting itself in the foot to new heights. Or depths.

Angels 7, White Sox 6: The Angels had a three-run lead in the ninth but couldn’t hold it. Then the Chisox took a 6-5 lead in the 11th, but couldn’t hold it. Cameron Maybin had five hits on the night, his final one a game-tying double. Then Albert Pujols singled home the winning run for the walkoff win. It was the Angels’ seventh walkoff win this year.

Athletics 9, Mariners 6: “Jesus, everything ends badly, otherwise it wouldn’t end.” Unless you’re the A’s, as this one ended well in their view. They were down one heading into the ninth only to put up five runs thanks to a two-run homer from Matt Joyce and a three-run shot from Mark Canha. The former came off of Steve Cishek, the latter off of Marc Rzepczynski. This a day after their usual closer, Edwin Diaz, walked the whole dang ballpark. I’m no expert, but I think it’s possible the M’s have some bullpen issues.

Brewers 6, Padres 2: Five first inning runs for the Brewers held up. Milwaukee leads all of baseball in bombs, but all of those runs, plus their sixth run later, came without the aid of a home run. Chicks loved this one, I bet. At least the ones who showed up at Petco last night, which wasn’t many.

Giants 2, Dodgers 1: Rich Hill came back and allowed one run over five, but Ty Blach allowed only one run over seven for the Giants and his bullpen was better. Not that the Dodgers’ pen was bad or anything, but Brandon Crawford did single home a run in the sixth for the winning margin. Brandon Belt homered for the fourth time in six games. The Giants have won five of six.

Angels overcome six-run deficit in ninth to beat Mariners

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Sunday afternoon was not a good day for relief pitchers wearing a Mariners uniform. The Mariners entered the bottom of the ninth inning against the Angels with a healthy 9-3 lead. Casey Fien had the responsibility of keeping the game out of reach for the Halos, but it was a responsibility he could not fulfill.

Albert Pujols led off with a solo home run to center field, making it a 9-4 game. Fien then walked Cliff Pennington, allowed a single to C.J. Cron, and walked Ben Revere to load the bases. Edwin Diaz came in to relieve Fien and he at least got an out when Danny Espinosa hit a ground ball to second base. Diaz fanned Martin Maldonado for the second out. Despite all that happened, the Angels still only had a 1.8 percent chance of winning according to FanGraphs.

Unfortunate for the Mariners, Yunel Escobar followed up with a bases-clearing double, cutting the deficit to 9-7. During the next at-bat, facing Kole Calhoun, Diaz uncorked a wild pitch, allowing Escobar to move to third base. Diaz finished off the at-bat by issuing a walk to Calhoun on four pitches, then walked Trout on four pitches to re-load the bases. Pujols, up for his second at-bat of the inning, singled to right field, plating two runs to tie the game at nine-all. Pennington ended it with a single to right, scoring Trout for the walk-off win.

According to ESPN Stats & Info, teams had lost 346 consecutive games entering Sunday when they trailed by six or more runs entering the ninth inning. The Angels ended that streak.