Corey Seager

And That Happened: Monday’s Scores and Highlights

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Here are the scores. Here are the highlights:

Giants 8, Dodgers 4: Four wins in a row for the Giants. They had a four-run fourth inning off of Brandon McCarthy, partially due to hitting him well, partially due to a brain lock he had, cutting off a Corey Seager throw intended to nail a runner who was dead to rights at home. We all have bad days at the office, I guess. Sometimes we misplace a file. Sometimes we lose a sale. Sometimes we lose track of a baserunner. Sometimes we intentionally reveal classified secrets to foreign agents which seriously jeopardize national security and intelligence-gathering. You just shake it off and try again tomorrow, ya know?

Diamondbacks 7, Mets 3Yasmany Tomas, Jeff Mathis and Daniel Descalso homered in a six-run eighth inning as the Mets lost their fifth straight. When the Noah Syndergaard injury fiasco and the Matt Harvey fiasco were going down and I was saying the Mets were in trouble, a non-trivial number of you said stuff like “they’ve won their last couple of series” or “they’re in second place.” I suppose that was technically correct at the time, but as I wake up and look at the news today, I am somewhat less impressed with people making technical arguments than I normally am.

Braves 10, Blue Jays 6: The Jays’ five-game winning streak comes to an end. Freddie Freeman hit a three-run homer, somehow not passing out with shock first at seeing actual men on base when he came to the plate. Nick Markakis homered and drove in three.

Angels 5, White Sox 3Mike Trout hit a solo shot off of Mike Pelfrey, breaking a 3-3 tie. It’s the fourth consecutive game in which Trout has homered, leaving him one shy of the Angels’ record. He’s at .352/.450/.752 and is on a pace to hit 47 homers. He will also never get the full-court promotional press from MLB the way a guy who has been retired for three years just did.

Mariners 6, Athletics 5Nelson Cruz and Kyle Seager each hit a two-run homer and reliever Tony Zych put out a ninth inning fire to stop a would-be A’s comeback. The fire was started by M’s closer Edwin Diaz who walked four of the five batters he faced. There were 15 walks overall in this game. Sounds riveting.

Indians 8, Rays 7: Indians starter Carlos Carrasco exited in the fourth inning because of tightness in his left pectoral muscle, but at least the Indians had a three-run lead when he did. The Cleveland bullpen allowed an inherited runner to score and Andrew Miller and Cody Allen of all people gave up two more later, but for the most part  they didn’t break over the final five innings.

Astros 7, Marlins 2: Yuli Gurriel hit a grand slam and Jose Altuve homered and drove in three as the Astros win despite not getting to their hotel in Miami until 5am yesterday morning. And despite the “momentum” the Marlins were supposed to have after winning on Sunday. Momentum is not a thing in baseball. Often sleep isn’t a thing either.

Padres 6, Brewers 5: This one went to extras and Eric Sogard put Milwaukee up with a 10th inning homer. Hunter Renfroe did him one better, though, smacking a two-run walkoff homer in the bottom half. Renfroe drove in four runs overall.

Video: Manny Machado hits a 470-foot home run

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You’ve seen Carlos Gomez’s 461-foot home run. You’ve seen Joey Gallo’s 462-foot blast. You’ve seen Corey Seager’s 462-footer, too. During Friday’s series opener against the Yankees, Manny Machado delivered the tie-breaker we were all hoping for, launching a 470-foot moonshot over the center field wall to pad the Orioles’ 5-0 lead in the fifth:

It was Machado’s fourth homer of the season, and quite a doozy, according to Statcast. MLB.com’s Brittany Ghiroli says that it’s currently the longest home run recorded at Yankee Stadium, dating back through Statcast’s inception in 2015.

Through eight innings, the Yankees and Orioles combined for five home runs and two grand slams, though none reached quite as far as Machado’s record-setting blast. Aaron Judge went deep twice, hitting the 417-foot mark in the fifth inning and the 435-mark in the sixth, while Mark Trumbo executed a 459-foot grand slam in the sixth inning, followed by a 420-foot slam from Jacoby Ellsbury in the seventh. The Orioles currently lead the Yankees 11-8 in the ninth inning.

 

And That Happened: Monday’s Scores and Highlights

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Here are the scores. Here are the highlights:

Cubs 14, Pirates 3: The Chicago Bears won only one game by as big a margin all last season as the Cubs won by here. Jason Heyward hit his third home run in four days and drove in four runs overall. He and his rebuilt swing are batting .294/.342/.456 with three homers and 16 RBI in 18 games.

White Sox 12, Royals 1: Both Chicago teams scored a couple of touchdowns last night. The White Sox just need a better placekicker for the PATs. DH Matt Davidson homered, doubled and drove in four. Davidson leads the White Sox in home runs with four and is tied for the team lead with 14 RBI. He’s not even an everyday player.

Orioles 6, Rays 3: Baltimore was down 3-1 on a crappy night, weather-wise, at Camden Yards. Then Hyun Soo Kim and Jonathan Schoop hit homers in the sixth followed by an Adam Jones two-run homer in the seventh too chase Chris Archer. Archer after the game:

“There was a few pitches I wish I could have back,” Archer said. “That’s baseball. Going into my next start, I plan on executing at a higher level. Even if it is just three or four pitches I have to execute, it has to be done.”

I would like to see one of those graphs which track how often words are used but only for major league pitchers’ use of the word “execute.” I bet it’s almost at zero until about 2000-03 or so, and then it shoots way the hell up. Probably all traceable to some pitching coach who decided to make himself sound more scientific. Everyone’s “executing” pitches these days. Very few guys are “throwing” them.

Rockies 8, Nationals 4: The Nats’ seven-game winning streak comes to an end. The Rockies snapped it by coming from behind. They were down 4-1 in the bottom of the sixth when Mark Reynolds hit a two-run homer to bring them close. The following inning Charlie Blackmon hit a two-run shot of his own to give Colorado a lead they would not relinquish. Blackmon said the pitch was in his “where I hit balls far” zone. See, isn’t that way more evocative than “executing” pitches? Bring more vernacular to the discourse, pitchers. It plays way, way better than this faux precision jazz.

Brewers 11, Reds 7: Eric Thames continues his early season rampage. Two more homers here, a solo shot in the first and a two-run blast in the second. The second one gave Milwaukee a five-run lead. Cincinnati would threaten for a brief period but the Brewers put up ten runs on Amir Garrett before the end of the fourth inning and that’s just too dang much to overcome. Had a conversation with a big Reds fan yesterday who was cautiously optimistic about his team’s early season play and asked me if it was sustainable. I told him “the pitching will be exposed soon.” I didn’t realize how soon it’d be.

Twins 3, Rangers 2: One hit — a three-run double from Brian Dozier in the fifth — was all Minnesota would get and all they would need. The hit was preceded by Martin Perez walking the bases loaded. The batters: the 6, 8 and 9 hitters. That’s . . . bad.

Diamondbacks 7, Padres 6: Zack Greinke allowed one run over six and struck out 11. He’s had one clunker on the year — five runs allowed to the Dodgers on April 14 — but otherwise Greinke has been the Greinke of old this season: a 2.93 ERA, a 1.17 WHIP and 31 strikeouts to six walks in 30.2 innings.

Angels 2, Blue Jays 1: Jesse Chavez tossed six innings of one-run, four-hit ball. The Blue Jays have scored four runs or less in 14 of their 18 games this season. That’s not good. The Angels’ runs came from a Mike Trout triple followed by an Albert Pujols single in the fourth and Cameron Maybin scoring on a fielder’s choice with a diving slide to beat the throw to the plate in the fifth.

Giants 2, Dodgers 1: Matt Cain was excellent, tossing six shutout innings, but Hyun-Jin Ryu was almost as good, allowing only one run over six. Ultimately bad base running dooms Los Angeles. Chris Taylor was thrown out stealing in the eighth inning with Corey Seager at the plate. Then Justin Turner was picked off of second to end the game.