Charlie Morton

Getty Images

And That Happened: Wednesday’s Scores and Highlights

18 Comments

Here are the scores. Here are the highlights:

Dodgers 5, White Sox 4: Yu Darvish was OK, but not great in his Dodger Stadium debut and his teammates could only manage two runs off of White Sox starter Carlos Rodon, so they found themselves down 4-2 heading into the bottom of the ninth. As has so often happened this year, however, L.A. rallied. Cody Bellinger singled, Logan Forsythe doubled him in, Austin Barnes singled to put men on second and third and then Yasiel Puig came up to bat and doubled both Forsythe and Barnes in for the tying and winning runs. In so doing, Puig — who has been both hot and a consummate team player of late, will wonders ever cease? — becomes the ninth different Dodger to have a walkoff hit in their ten walkoff wins this year. They’re now on pace for 116 wins, which would match the all-time record.

 

Ok, let us all note right now that four games finished with the final score of 7-6 last night. This is important. This means something.

Brewers 7, Pirates 6: Milwaukee hit five homers yesterday, with Manny Pina‘s two-run shot in the eighth putting them over and giving the Brewers their fourth straight win. Keon Broxton homered twice and Neil Walker and Travis Shaw also went deep as Milwaukee moves into sole possession of second place in the central, a game and a half back of the Cubs.

Royals 7, Athletics 6: Oakland tied it in the bottom of the eighth with a Matt Chapman two-run homer but Alex Gordon hit a go-ahead RBI single in the top of the ninth to give the Royals the win. Here’s A’s manager Bob Melvin after the game, offering comments which basically mirror my internal monologue every time I have to recap a 7-6, 9-8, 10-7 (or something like that) game with lots of lead changes and crap pitching:

“It just was an ugly game all the way around. There was no pace to the game, and it just seemed like one of those games that was just blah.”

I’ve been recapping scores for a decade now and I can say that such games are the hardest to recap, mostly because there’s no great through-narrative. The easiest to recap are ones where a starter dominates. Not the best, just the easiest (“Shlabotnik tosses eight shutout innings, striking out 11 as . . .”). The best are ones are ones with big dumb fights and controversies or bad ump calls or something. Dramatic walkoffs are a close second. I should probably do a post some time with a bunch of bullet points discussing all of the dumb little things about writing these recaps that y’all probably don’t realize. The only thing stopping me is that you probably don’t care.

Mariners 7, Orioles 6: Yonder Alonso hit his first homer for Seattle and drove in three runs, Leonys Martin homered to give the M’s what would be their winning run and Marc Rzepczynski struck out Chris Davis with the bases loaded to end an O’s threat and the game.

Cubs 7, Reds 6: This game had everything. A first-inning grand slam, a stolen base from John Lackey (followed by Lackey getting picked off because he flew too close to the sun, apparently) and a walkoff wild pitch:

Mercy. I mean, really, how often do you see a game end when a catcher can’t handle a throw to the plate?

Red Sox 5, Cardinals 4: Oh, well, more often than I imagined, I suppose:

That was Mookie Betts lining that two-run double off the Green Monster with two outs in the ninth inning, capping Boston’s three-run game-winning rally. Xander Bogaerts opened the ninth with a solo homer. In between all of that, one of the weirdest things I can recall happening went down: Cards reliever John Brebbia was in his motion, when home plate umpire Chris Segal called timeout, negating the pitch and, you assume, messing with Brebbia’s rhythm. It wasn’t because the batter called time and Segal simply granted it too late — that happens a lot. No, it was Segal calling time on his own because “needed a break.” Really. That’s what he said to Mike Matheny when he came out to ask for an explanation. Matheny understandably went nuts and got ejected, saying “it’s not your show.” I’m no Matheny fan, but I’d be just as pissed in his place.

Padres 3, Phillies 0: Clayton Richard had a three-hit, complete game shutout. See: those are easy to write up. That’s really the whole story of the game. Next!

Ah, damn, not the whole story:

Wil Myers‘ feat marks the first time a player has stolen all three bases in the same inning since Dee Gordon did it in 2011.

Yankees 5, Mets 3: Aaron Judge hit a massive homer into the third deck of Citi Field — I’ve been up there, brother, and let me tell you it’s far — and Didi Gregorius broke a seventh-inning tie with a two-run double. I was watching this game at someone else’s house as I had been drafted to babysit their toddler. Observations: (1) it’s been almost ten years since I had a toddler, and no matter how cute and adorable they are (and this one is) I forgot how much is sucks to not be able to turn on a game until the fifth inning or so because of the playing and bedtime rituals and all of that, but I managed it; and (2) being forced to watch a Rick Sutcliffe-called game because you’re in a place where you can’t access your MLB.tv account is a high class problem to have but, buddy, it’s a problem. Lord he’s awful.

Blue Jays 3, Rays 2: Marcus Stroman allowed two runs while pitching into the seventh inning and Steve Pearce homered and scored twice. The Rays have scored two or fewer runs in nine of their past 12 games. They’re 1-8 in those games, which makes a lot of sense.

Rangers 12, Tigers 6: Texas sweeps the three game series thanks to Elvis Andrus‘ four RBI, which included the go-ahead run in the form of a solo homer. Joey Gallo (natch), Nomar Mazara and Adrian Beltre also went deep for the Rangers.

Astros 9, Diamondbacks 5Josh Reddick hit a two-run homer in a four-run eighth inning and Charlie Morton allowed one run in six and a third. The Astros win back-to-back games for the first time in three weeks.

Rockies 17, Braves 2: Well that was a beatdown. Trevor Story had two homers and knocked in six, Mark Reynolds homered and drove in four, knocking four hits in all, and Gerardo Parra added three hits and four RBI. This was only the second-highest run total for the Rockies this year because Rockies.

Marlins 8, Giants 1: Giancarlo Stanton‘s home run streak ended but he still had two hits, scored a run and stole a base, so maybe he’ll now go on some crazy small-ball tear. Tomas Telis drove in three for Miami. Jose Urena allowed only one unearned run over five and three Marlins relievers held San Francisco scoreless for the final four frames.

Angels 3, Nationals 2: Ryan Zimmerman hit a two-run homer in the first but Luis Valbuena hit a solo shot for the Angels in the fifth and Cole Calhoun hit a two-run blast in the sixth and that was all the scoring there was. The Angels have won seven of eight and sit alone in the second Wild Card spot in the American League. Who woulda thunk it?

Indians vs. Twins — POSTPONED:

I’ve been loving you a long time
Down all the years, down all the days
And I’ve cried for all your troubles
Smiled at your funny little ways
We watched our friends grow up together
And we saw them as they fell
Some of them fell into Heaven
Some of them fell into Hell
I took shelter from a shower
And I stepped into your arms
On a rainy night in Soho
The wind was whistling all its charms

And That Happened: Saturday’s Scores and Highlights

Getty Images
1 Comment

Here are the rest of Saturday’s scores and highlights:

Dodgers 7, Mets 4: The Mets have yet to win one against the Dodgers this season, and it may have something to do with L.A.’s historic run. The Dodgers improved to a league-best 78 wins on Saturday, overcoming the Mets’ initial three-run lead with a comeback effort from Rich Hill and a seven-run rally that featured home runs from Chris Taylor, Cody Bellinger, Yasiel Puig, Justin Turner and Corey Seager. Per MLB.com’s Anthony DiComo and Ken Gurnick, they’ve taken “12 of their last 13, 23 of 26 and 43 of 50, the best 50-game MLB stretch since the 1912 New York Giants.” The 1912 New York Giants, of course, went on to drop the World Series to the rival Red Sox, but for now, it’s a good omen for the best team in baseball.

Cubs 7, Nationals 4: The Cubs may not be running away with the division this year, but they don’t appear ready to relinquish their first-place ranking just yet. Alex Avila cranked his first home run with the club during Saturday’s win, rounding out a four-run first inning that gave the Cubs the boost they needed to snap a three-game losing streak.

Brewers 3, Rays 0: The Brewers posted back-to-back shutouts on Friday and Saturday, extending their pitchers’ streak to 22 scoreless innings with a shutdown performance from Zach Davies. It’s just enough to keep them on the Cubs’ tail, though they haven’t been able to close that half-game gap and retake the division lead just yet.

Orioles 5, Tigers 2: Tim Beckham helped the Orioles to another collective franchise milestone on Saturday, capping the team’s win with their third home run of the night and their 10,000th regular season blast.

His historic home run followed a record-setting shot on Thursday, when Beckham’s eighth-inning dinger ricocheted into right field for the 2,500th home run by an Orioles player at Camden Yards.

Padres 5, Pirates 2: The Pirates are still in the running for the NL Central title, but they won’t be getting there anytime soon — at least, not if Dinelson Lamet and the Padres have anything to do with it. San Diego snared their first win of the series behind 5 2/3 scoreless frames from their rookie right-hander, and supplemented his efforts at the plate with a pair of homers from Wil Myers and Dusty Coleman. Unfortunately for the Padres, playing spoiler to other NL teams is about as exciting as their 2017 season will get, as they currently sit nearly 14 games back of the wild card and almost a full 30 behind the NL West leaders.

Red Sox 4, White Sox 1: Drew Pomeranz lifted the Red Sox to their fifth consecutive win on Saturday, firing 6 1/3 innings of one-run ball and striking out eight batters en route to his 11th win of the year. Unlike his six-inning, one-run loss to the Royals last week, Pomeranz was treated to adequate run support and a solid backing by the bullpen, who set down 2 2/3 scoreless innings to preserve the Sox’ three-run lead. Then again, it must be easy to pull off a win when your opponents look… well, a little lifeless:

Braves 7, Marlins 2: Giancarlo Stanton muscled another home run into the stands of SunTrust Park on Saturday, but his 446-footer barely put a dent in the Braves’ seven-run effort. The rest of the Marlins’ lineup was frustrated by Mike Foltynewicz, who whiffed 11 batters in 6 1/3 innings for the Braves’ 51st win of the year.

Yankees 2, Indians 1: There’s only so much Danny Salazar can reasonably be expected to do. On Saturday, those reasonable expectations included seven innings of 12-strikeout, one-run ball, during which the Indians tried and failed to procure more than a single run. Chase Headley‘s eighth-inning blast sealed their fate, giving the Yankees a one-run lead to carry them to their 58th win of the season.

Cardinals 4, Reds 1: The Cardinals moved within five games of the division lead on Saturday, taking their first game of the series with a solid performance from Lance Lynn and Paul DeJong‘s two-run shot in the third inning. It was a rare display of power for the club, who ranks 21st in the league with 126 home runs and entered Saturday without a single 15-homer player on their roster.

Rangers 4, Twins 1: Cole Hamels came one run shy of a ‘Maddux’ on Saturday, wielding 96 pitches in a complete game effort on Saturday evening. His attempt was foiled in the fifth inning, when Byron Buxton and Ehire Adrianza netted the Twins’ first and only run on a productive out. Robinson Chirinos, whose throwing error helped position Buxton for the run, also helped pad Hamels’ lead, going 1-for-3 with a sac fly and RBI single.

Blue Jays 4, Astros 2 (10 innings): Josh Reddick clubbed his 11th home run, Tyler White collected his third blast of the year, and Charlie Morton matched Marco Estrada pitch-for-pitch on the mound, but in the end, it all came down to a game of tag between Rob Refsnyder and Brian McCann:

Rockies 8, Phillies 5: The Rockies cruised to their third straight win on Saturday, helping themselves to a five-run lead after batting around in the first inning. Jon Gray went seven strong with one run and four strikeouts, but found his seven-run lead partially erased on a three-run jack from Daniel Nava in the eighth inning:

The Phillies grabbed a final run off of Pat Neshek in the ninth, but still fell three runs shy for their second loss of the series.

Giants 5, Diamondbacks 4 (10 innings): The last time Pablo Sandoval appeared for the Giants, he went 3-for-3 in a Game 7 nail-biter to help clinch the 2014 World Series. Saturday’s homecoming was bound to be less auspicious, but Sandoval still made it count: he went 1-for-3 with a double and scored a run on Jarrett Parker‘s RBI double in the seventh inning. He also committed a costly error in the fifth inning and overthrew the first base bag to send opposing starter Taijuan Walker home to score. Luckily, Parker was there to bail the Giants out again in the 10th inning, plating a walk-off RBI single to move the club within 36 games of first place.

Athletics 5, Angels 0: The Athletics spoiled the Angels’ four-game win streak on Saturday, backing Paul Blackburn‘s scoreless outing with Dustin Garneau’s RBI single, a handful of miscues by the Angels and a pair of standout defensive snags from Andrelton Simmons:

Four of the A’s five runs came via wild pitch, error, force attempt and stolen base. Outfielder Mark Canha recorded the club’s final run with his second stolen base of the year, swiping home on a double steal after the ball popped out of Martin Maldonado‘s glove at the plate:

Mariners, Royals (postponed): Rain kept the field soggy and the baseball players away on Saturday afternoon, forcing the Royals to squeeze a doubleheader into their plans on Sunday. They had nothing on the New Orleans Baby Cakes, however, whose catcher was spotted swimming through the dugout after the field was submerged:

And That Happened: Monday’s Scores and Highlights

Getty Images
15 Comments

After you jump into the recaps, make sure you check out our rundown of trade deadlines winners and losers.

Here are the scores. Here are the highlights:

Astros 14, Rays 7Jake Marisnick hit two homers and drove in four. He’s the Astros’ number nine hitter, folks. Derek Fisher homered, singled and doubled, driving in two. He’s a rookie, folks. Charlie Morton got the win, allowing two runs over six innings. He’s Charlie Morton, folks. The Astros can even beat you with their B-team.

Phillies 7, Braves 6Odubel Herrera hit a three-run shot to make it 4-0 in the third. Maikel Franco hit a solo shot. The Phillies are 5-0 since they began a series of trades that rid them of Jeremy Hellickson, Pat Neshek, Joaquin Benoit and Howie Kendrick. The lesson I’m gonna choose to take from this: never let anyone tell you that wisdom and experience matters. Just go out and do your thing.

Red Sox 6, Indians 2:  Mookie Betts drove in three and Eduardo Nunez drove in two. Rookie Rafael Devers was 4-for-4 with a double and he singled in a run. He’s now 10-for-24 with two doubles and two homers in six big-league games. After the game he said, “sometimes out there I’ll close my eyes and make contact, and wherever it goes, that’s where it goes.” There are some life lessons to be found in there too, I suspect.

Yankees 7, Tigers 3: Luis Severino remains on a roll, allowing one run over five innings and striking out eight. The Yankees scored four in the fourth via two-run hits from Chase Headley and Todd Frazier. Aaron Judge homered in the fifth. Another lesson can be seen both here and in the Red Sox game. In Boston, Devers knocked in the guy whose acquisition was supposed to force his demotion in Eduardo Nunez. Here both Headley and the guy who was supposed to make him superfluous, Frazier, drove in runs. I think we can look at this and—-*16 ton weight falls on Craig’s head, ending this cosmic b.s. for the day*—

Orioles 2, Royals 1: Danny Duffy and Ubaldo Jimenez dueled for seven innings, each allowing one run while striking out six. In the ninth, Joakim Soria got got, however, as Caleb Joseph, Ruben Tejada and Craig Gentry all hit singles, with Gentry’s driving in Joseph for the walkoff win.

Nationals 1, Marlins 0: Gio Gonzalez took a no-hitter into the ninth inning and, after giving up a single to Dee Gordon, made way for Sean Doolittle to close it out. Bryce Harper singled in the game’s only run in the sixth. Jose Urena pitched well for Miami in the loss, allowing only that lone run on three hits in eight innings of his own. The game lasted a mere two hours and twelve minutes.

Mariners 6, Rangers 4: This one was tied at four in the ninth inning when Robinson Cano singled in two. Leonys Martin drove in two as well. Cole Hamels and Felix Hernandez combined to give up eight runs in eleven and a third innings. I’m so old when I remember that the two of them facing off would mean a pitchers duel.

White Sox 7, Blue Jays 6: Toronto held a 6-1 lead heading into the bottom of the eighth, thanks in large part to Marco Estrada‘s one run, seven inning performance. At that point the Jays bullpen came into play and the White Sox’ bats woke up. Matt Davidson hit a two-run blast, Yolmer Sanchez hit a solo shot and Jose Abreu singled in a run in the eighth. In the ninth, Abreu singled in the tying run and Davidson singled in the winning run to complete the comeback and walk things off. It was Davidson’s second walkoff hit in as many days, as he homered to win the Sox-Indians game on Sunday.

Athletics 8, Giants 5: The A’s were down 3-2 in the bottom of the sixth when Marcus Semien connected for a grand slam. Jed Lowrie had three hits and an RBI, Ryon Healy added a two-run single and Matt Joyce reached base four times and scored twice. The A’s won even though the guy who was supposed to start for them last night — Sonny Gray — got shipped to the Yankees befre the game. With this loss, the Giants now have the worst record, by winning percentage, in all of baseball.