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Video: Jacob deGrom blasts his first career home run

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Following in the footsteps of fellow Mets’ pitcher-hurler Noah Syndergaard and, to a lesser extent, former Met Bartolo Colon, Jacob deGrom hit his first career home run during Sunday’s series finale against the Nationals.

Down 0-1 in the third inning, deGrom crushed a first-pitch sinker off of the Nats’ Joe Ross, depositing it just over the 370-foot marker in left field:

The 379-foot blast marked his second extra-base hit of the season, tying the career high he set during his rookie season in 2014.

On the mound, he was equally as dominant, keeping the Nationals to one run through six innings and striking out four of 23 batters faced. The Mets, meanwhile, helped back their starter with another pair of runs in the fourth inning, building a two-run lead on a throwing error from catcher Matt Wieters and an RBI single from Michael Conforto. The Mets currently lead the Nationals 3-1 in the bottom of the sixth.

And That Happened: Sunday’s Scores and Highlights

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Here are the scores. Here are the highlights:

Yankees 14, Orioles 3: Aaron Judge went 4-for-4 with two homers, one of which was the longest home run hit in baseball this year. He also doubled, walked and scored four times. Judge has 21 homers on the year. Eight of them have come against the Orioles in a mere 12 games. Lost in all of that was Starlin Castro driving in five. New York has won five in a row and has scored 55 runs in those five games. They’re just ridiculous right now, and they’re being led by the most ridiculously good story of 2017.

Indians 4, White Sox 2: Carlos Carrasco allowed two runs in five and a third and got pulled when the White Sox were rallying. The Indians bullpen, however, does not abide rallies. Andrew Miller came in to put out the fire and he, Bryan Shaw and Cody Allen smothered whatever embers there were in the Chicago bats, tossing three and two-thirds of one-hit relief in total. When Cleveland has those horses rested and ready to go like they did here, the game is short for the opposition.

Rangers 5, Nationals 1: Austin Bibens-Dirkx allowed a run and three hits in seven innings while making his second big league start. In other news I refuse to believe that someone with a name like “Austin Bibens-Dirkx” is a 32-year-old rookie pitcher for the Texas Rangers and not am intense, high-powered, flamboyantly-dressed British magazine publisher with a dark secret. I mean, honestly, if someone showed you these two guys and asked you pick which one you think is named “Austin Bibens-Dirkx,” which would you choose?

Dang right.

Oh, Max Scherzer lost the game but he also struck out ten and topped 2,000 strikeouts for his career.

Giants 13, Twins 8: The Giants’ offense broke out just in time to help them avoid a three-game sweep. Buster Posey had three hits and four RBI. Hunter Pence added three doubles and scored three times. Oh, speaking of baseball names: it’s a well-known fact that every person named “Hunter” is or was at one time a top baseball prospect. Really, if you ever meet a Hunter, it is 100% the case that they reached at least Double-A for some organization.

Rays 5, Athletics 4Mallex Smith was called up on Friday to take the spot of the injured Kevin Kiermaier and quickly contributed, going 8-for-14 over the weekend including three hits in this one as the Rays take three of four from Oakland. The A’s have dropped eight straight series on the road.

Mets 2, Braves 1: Seth Lugo, who has been on the DL all year, made his season debut and gave up only one run and six hits, striking out seven and walking two as New York takes three of four. Lugo also doubled and scored. Mets pitchers have given up only nine runs in the past five games.

Pirates 3, Marlins 1Ivan Nova pitched six shutout innings and catcher Elias Diaz drove in two of the Pirates’ three runs and scored the third one. Ichiro hit a homer. It was his second of the year. He last hit more than one homer in a year in 2013. That doesn’t exactly validate that weird “Ichiro could totally have been a home run hitter if he wanted to” thing that used to float around baseball circles, but it’s kind of cool anyway. With Bartolo Colon sort of imploding this year it’s good to see another of baseball’s 40-something club still functioning.

Angels 12, Astros 6: The Angles took a 3-0 lead, the Astros scored six to take a 6-3 lead and then the Angels said “screw this,” and piled on twelve unanswered runs after that. Unanswered on the scoreboard at least. In the dugout they were probably answered by A.J. Hinch with a bunch of profanity and stuff. Eric Young Jr. drove in four, including a three run homer. Albert Pujols homered too. Young is hitting .318/.412/.523 with seven driven in and four stolen bases in the 13 games he’s played since taking Mike Trout‘s place on the roster. That’s not Wally Pipp/Lou Gehrig stuff, but it’s been a nice pick-me-up for the Angels.

Cardinals 6, Phillies 5: After a seven game losing streak, the Cardinals shook up their coaching staff on Friday afternoon. Then they won three straight over the weekend. Coincidence?! Well, yeah, probably actually. That and playing the hapless Phillies (Note: the Phillies weren’t hapless from 2007-2010, as they had Happ). Dexter Fowler hit a three-run homer.

Cubs 7, Rockies 5: The Cubs salvage one here and snap their five-game losing streak. In so doing they snap the Rockies seven-game winning streak. Addison RussellKyle SchwarberMiguel Montero and Ben Zobrist all homered as the Cubs climb back to .500.

Blue Jays 4, Mariners 0Josh Donaldson hit a two-run homer and drove in three. J.A. Happ tossed six shutout innings and the pen took it from there. And it really was a group effort: it took six Blue Jays relievers — six! — to record the final nine outs. If Billy Martin were alive today and you told him that a team won 4-0 and needed six guys for the last three innings he’d . . . well, be super drunk and angry and would probably try to pick a fight with you because he doesn’t “like you FACE,” but the point remains. I guess. I don’t know.

Dodgers 9, Reds 7: Cincinnati had a 7-3 lead heading into the bottom of the eighth but the Dodgers rallied for six. Four of those came on a Corey Seager grand slam. Cody Bellinger hit a solo shot to lead off that evening. The Dodgers may be the $200-gabillion dollar team and all of that but the low-paid kids are pretty dang good, eh?

Diamondbacks 11, Brewers 1: Robbie Ray continues his torrid run, striking out 12 batters in six and two-thirds shutout innings. Ray is 5-0 in his last five starts and has given up just one run over 37 innings while striking out 48 in that span. Paul Goldschmidt had a grand slam.

Royals 8, Padres 3: Two homers for Mike Moustakas. Jake Junis allowed three runs over seven innings. I’m inclined to riff on his name too, but these recaps are already kinda late today, so let’s move on.

Tigers 8, Red Sox 3: The Tigers avoid a sweep thanks in part to a Justin Upton grand slam in the course of a five-run fifth inning. Nicholas Castellanos added a two-run homer. This game took more than four hours. Which made me happy that the kids commandeered my TV last night to watch the Tony Awards, preventing me from sitting through this.

What, don’t all 11-year-old boys and 13-year-old girls watch the Tony Awards?

And That Happened: Tuesday’s Scores and Highlights

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Obviously the big story last night was Reds left fielder Scooter Gennett hitting four homers and driving in ten runs as the Reds romped over the Cardinals. 13-1. That was pretty random, eh? Gennett, coming in to last night only had 38 homers in his entire four year career, and then he uncorks that crazy night. I love how random baseball can be sometimes.

My personal preference is to just let weirdness be weirdness when it comes to baseball oddities like that. You can’t predict them so you probably should just let it all pleasantly wash over you rather than StatCast it and analyze it to death. We’re all gonna remember Scooter Freakin’ Gennett as a guy who hit four homers in a game, much like the way we remember Mark Whiten and a couple of others for that. Barring an MVP Award or something, this will be his legacy and it’s a damn fine one to have, so who cares what the launch angle was, you know?

Of course, we are in the baseball content business here, so we’ll take some extra looks at the feat. Here is Bill’s look at the significance of it all, statistically speaking, from last night. You can see all four of the homers here:

 

My final take on it: last night, just after Gennett hit his fourth homer, I was goofing around on Twitter with a couple of friends, imagining how such a rare and spectacular feat might be described by the player after the game. We joked that they’d still use the same cliches. Like this:

Here’s what Gennett actually said:

Baseball: it’s always there for us, never changing in an increasingly chaotic and ever-changing world. God bless ballplayers, everywhere. God bless their executed pitches, good pitches to hit and their lack of a desire to press and do too much out there, even when they do superhuman things.

Here are the scores, here are the highlights:

Reds 13, Cardinals 1: Lost in Gennett’s night is the fact that Reds starter Tim Adleman shut the Cards down, allowing only one run over seven innings and that Adam Wainwright, who gave up only one homer, the grand slam, to Gennett, got shelled for nine runs overall in less than four innings. Certainly not a night the Cardinals are gonna want to think about for long.

Red Sox 5, Yankees 4: The Red Sox and Yankees play a game that can go right up there with their classic rivalry games from 15 years ago. Not because the game was fantastic, but because it took over three and a half hours for them to play it despite there being only 15 hits between the two teams. Mitch MorelandHanley Ramirez and Andrew Benintendi all hit homers off of Masahiro Tanaka, who continues to struggle mightily and is probably due for a DL stint with one of those phantom injuries like the one Bartolo Colon was given yesterday. Craig Kimbrel closed the game out by striking out five batters in an inning and a third thanks to one of them reaching on a wild pitch. Kimbrel has been mind-bogglingly good lately. He’s retired 80 batters on the year. Fifty-three of those 80 were retired via strikeout. He’s on a pace to strike out 151 guys. Last year that would’ve put him in 25th place in the American League in strikeouts. This from a guy who pitches one inning a night. Mercy.

Orioles 6, Pirates 5: The Pirates led late but Jonathan Schoop tied it in the ninth with his second homer of the game — we call that a half-Scooter in the biz — and Mark Trumbo singled home a run in the 10th to complete the comeback.

Angels 5, Tigers 3: The Angels had a 4-0 lead mid-game, the Tigers crept back in and tried to rally in the ninth but Bud Norris stopped the bleeding. But just barely. The Tigers loaded the bases with two outs and Norris fell behind 3-0 to Alex Avila. He managed to strike Avila out though, with Avila getting caught looking at strike three. Phew. Kole Calhoun and C.J. Cron homered for the Angels.

White Sox 4, Rays 2Avisail Garcia, Yolmer Sanchez and Todd Frazier homered for the White Sox (a collective .75Gennett, per StatCast or whatever) as they snap a five-game losing streak. Jose Quintana was solid after tossing complete stink bombs in his previous two outings.

Phillies 3, Braves 1: Aaron Nola allowed one run on five hits over eight innings. Odubel Herrera doubled in the go-ahead run in the sixth and then came around to score on a balk later in the inning. Someone in the Spanish-speaking press should ask Mike Schmidt for his opinions on that and then disparage him if he answers in English.

Brewers 5, Giants 2: Chase Anderson pitched seven and two-thirds shutout innings and [all together now] helped is own cause by doubling in a run in the third. Matt Cain gave up five runs on ten hits in five innings. After a solid April that had a lot of people talking about his comeback, Cain has seen his ERA climb over two and a half runs in seven starts.

Rangers 10, Mets 8: Rangers pitchers gave up five homers — and Jay Bruce almost hit another one, only to have it robbed by Jared Hoying — to the Mets but their hitters bailed ’em out by rattling off ten runs on 16 hits. Joey Gallo‘s 17th homer on the year came in the third inning, making it 5-4 Texas. There was a lot more scoring to come, but that put the Rangers up for good in this one.

Cubs 10, Marlins 2: Jake Arrieta pitched two-hit ball into the seventh and Anthony Rizzo drove in four as the Cubs win their fifth in a row. That comes on the heels of six straight losses. Streaky.

Royals 9, Astros 7: Speaking of streaks, the Astros’ 11-game run is now over thanks to Mike Moustakas‘ two-run shot with two outs in the ninth to help Kansas City rally back from a six-run deficit. On any other morning we slap Moustakas’ face up at the top of this post.

Rockies 11, Indians 3: Rockies starter Antonio Senzatela hit a three-run double in the second inning and was steady into the seventh inning as the Rockies romped. Mark Reynolds hit two homers and drove in five.

Diamondbacks 10, Padres 2: Robbie Ray continues his torrid run, striking out 11 Padres batters and allowing just one run while pitching into the seventh. Jake Lamb drove in four and Chris Owings knocked in three.

Athletics 4, Blue Jays 1: Jesse Hahn was activated from the DL and came in to allow only an unearned run in six innings. Khris Davis knocked in two and Ryon Healy hit an RBI.

Mariners 12, Twins 3Robinson Cano and Kyle Seager each hit three-run homers as the M’s stay hot, winning their eighth game in nine tries. All that offense made up for a mediocre James Paxton start.

Nationals 2, Dodgers 1: Death taxes and Max Scherzer striking out a bunch of dudes. Here he allowed only an unearned run in seven innings and struck out 14 Dodgers batters. His K-totals in his last three starts: 14, 11 and 13. He’s started 12 games this year. He’s struck out ten or more guys in half of them.