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Torey Lovullo, Paul Molitor win 2017 Manager of the Year Awards

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Diamondbacks skipper Torey Lovullo won the National League Manager of the Year Award. In his first year as a manager, he helped lead the Diamondbacks to a 93-69 record, good enough to earn home field advantage in the Wild Card game, where they defeated the Rockies to advance into the NLDS. They were then swept by the Dodgers.

The D-Backs finished 69-93 in 2016, which prompted the firing of then-manager Chip Hale and a complete overhaul of the front office. Lovullo was part of a new direction in which the organization wanted to go.

Lovullo, 52, is the third Diamondbacks manager to win the award. Kirk Gibson won it in 2011 and Bob Melvin won it in 2007. Lovullo received 18 first-place votes, five second-place votes, and six third-place votes. Dodgers manager Dave Roberts, who finished in second place, received five first-place votes, eight second-place votes, and six third-place votes. Third-place finisher Bud Black of the Rockies had three first-place votes, six second-place votes, and 10 third-place votes. Also receiving votes were Craig Counsell of the Brewers, Dusty Baker of the Nationals, and Joe Maddon of the Cubs.

In the American League, Twins skipper Paul Molitor won the honor. After losing 103 games in 2016, Molitor helped orchestrate a quick turnaround as the Twins went 85-77 in 2017, good for the second AL Wild Card. They ended up losing to the Yankees in a brief playoff appearance. It was the first time a team had lost 100 games and then reached the playoffs in the very next season.

Molitor, 61, just finished his third year at the helm of the Twins. He had a Hall of Fame career as a player, spending 21 seasons in the big leagues including his last three with the Twins. He’s the first Twins manager to win the award since Ron Gardenhire in 2010 and the third in franchise history (Tom Kelly, 1991). Molitor and Frank Robinson are the only Hall of Fame players to win Manager of the Year Awards.

Molitor received 18 first-place votes, six second-place votes, and four third-place votes. Indians manager Terry Francona, who finished in second place, had 11 first-place votes, nine second-place votes, and eight third-place votes. Third-place finisher A.J. Hinch of the Astros had one first-place vote, 13 second-place votes, and 12 third-place votes. Former Yankees manager Joe Girardi also received votes.

It’s worth noting that the Baseball Writers Association of America completes its balloting before the start of the postseason, so Hinch winning the World Series had no impact on the results.

Giants, Cardinals reportedly have offers on the table for Giancarlo Stanton

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We’re entering what is typically one of the slowest news weeks in the baseball calendar. Occasionally some big free agents sign around now. For example, it was 20 years ago today Andres Galarraga signed with the Braves, and I still remember being in an airport on the way home to visit my parents when I heard the news. I’m an old man.

The biggest news that is likely to happen this offseason is Giancarlo Stanton being traded. That hasn’t happened yet, but here are the latest bits of news on that:

Jon Morosi of MLB Network reports that the Cardinals have made a formal trade offer to the Marlins for Stanton. No word what they’re offering, but the clubs have been in discussion for some time and it has been reported that the Marlins are the most interested in doing a deal with St. Louis due to the prospects they could send to Miami. There is a sense, however, that Stanton would be hesitant to approve a trade to the Cardinals because he prefers to play on the West Coast;

The Giants play on the west coast, and over the weekend they were reported to be the “most aggressive team” in trade talks for Stanton at the moment. Ken Rosenthal reports that the Giants have likewise made an offer. Their farm system is nowhere near as stocked as that of the Cardinals, so it’s unclear whether they have the prospects to make Miami happy. They could, of course, eat a lot of Stanton’s $295 million contract to make up for that, of course, but (a) doing so would put them over the luxury tax; and (b) the Marlins no doubt want to spur a rebuild with a Stanton trade, so if they can’t get some blue chip prospects back in return, what’s the point?

UPDATE: Who knows if this is anywhere close to enough — I’m guessing not — but this is what the Giants reportedly have on the table:

Anyway, that’s where we are as we begin Thanksgiving week.