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Home runs spark 5-2 win over Cubs, Dodgers take a 1-0 lead in NLCS

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The Dodgers worked their way to a 1-0 advantage in Game 1 of the NLCS on Saturday, powering through another short start from Clayton Kershaw with a handful of homers and a shutdown performance from the bullpen. Jose Quintana went five strong for the Cubs, allowing two runs on a pair of hits and walks, but Chicago’s relievers cracked under pressure, handing Los Angeles the lead with home runs from Chris Taylor and Yasiel Puig and a controversial play at the plate.

At the outset of the game, it looked like both sides were in for a pitcher’s duel, albeit a short-lived one. Kershaw needed 23 pitches to get through the first inning, but worked out of a jam to strand two baserunners and was able to make it through three scoreless innings before Albert Almora Jr.’s two-run homer in the fourth. Quintana was more dominant, setting down 11 of the first 12 batters to preserve Chicago’s one-run lead through four frames.

In the fifth, the Dodgers caught up with him. Logan Forsythe and Austin Barnes drew back-to-back walks, which prompted a visit to the mound moments before Yasiel Puig ripped a one-out RBI double into center field. Charlie Culberson followed the double with a sac fly to tie the game.

With the score knotted 2-2 in the sixth and Kershaw closing in on 90 pitches, Dodgers’ skipper Dave Roberts pulled the left-hander for fellow lefty Tony Cingrani. The five-inning performance stands as Kershaw’s shortest postseason start since Game 6 of the 2016 NLCS. Cingrani, meanwhile, pitched to just one batter, inducing a groundout before he was pulled for Kenta Maeda.

The Dodgers kept things interesting for Hector Rondon, who replaced Quintana in the sixth and promptly gave up a 401-foot, go-ahead home run to Chris Taylor. Rondon was immediately removed from the mound, but the damage had already been done. In the seventh, Yasiel Puig led off with another home run, this one a 378-footer courtesy of Mike Montgomery.

The real drama, however, came later. Culberson doubled into left field, followed by a base hit from Taylor. With one out and John Lackey on the mound, Justin Turner lined a single into left to score Culberson, who was blocked at the plate by Cubs’ catcher Willson Contreras. The initial ruling determined Culberson was out at home, but a challenge revealed that Contreras had violated the home-plate collision rule by blocking the runner’s path to home plate without first having possession of the ball.

Despite protests from an irate Joe Maddon, the ruling was overturned in the Dodgers’ favor, boosting them to a three-run lead with two innings left to play. The Cubs couldn’t get another runner on base against Tony Watson and Kenley Jansen, the latter of whom struck out the side on 13 pitches to cap the Dodgers’ win in the ninth.

Game 2 is set for Sunday evening, when Rich Hill (12-8, 3.32 ERA) will face off against Jon Lester (13-8, 4.33 ERA) at 7:30 PM ET. From there, the series will move to Chicago for Games 3 (Yu Darvish vs. Kyle Hendricks) and 4 (Alex Wood vs. Jake Arrieta).

Giants, Cardinals reportedly have offers on the table for Giancarlo Stanton

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We’re entering what is typically one of the slowest news weeks in the baseball calendar. Occasionally some big free agents sign around now. For example, it was 20 years ago today Andres Galarraga signed with the Braves, and I still remember being in an airport on the way home to visit my parents when I heard the news. I’m an old man.

The biggest news that is likely to happen this offseason is Giancarlo Stanton being traded. That hasn’t happened yet, but here are the latest bits of news on that:

Jon Morosi of MLB Network reports that the Cardinals have made a formal trade offer to the Marlins for Stanton. No word what they’re offering, but the clubs have been in discussion for some time and it has been reported that the Marlins are the most interested in doing a deal with St. Louis due to the prospects they could send to Miami. There is a sense, however, that Stanton would be hesitant to approve a trade to the Cardinals because he prefers to play on the West Coast;

The Giants play on the west coast, and over the weekend they were reported to be the “most aggressive team” in trade talks for Stanton at the moment. Ken Rosenthal reports that the Giants have likewise made an offer. Their farm system is nowhere near as stocked as that of the Cardinals, so it’s unclear whether they have the prospects to make Miami happy. They could, of course, eat a lot of Stanton’s $295 million contract to make up for that, of course, but (a) doing so would put them over the luxury tax; and (b) the Marlins no doubt want to spur a rebuild with a Stanton trade, so if they can’t get some blue chip prospects back in return, what’s the point?

UPDATE: Who knows if this is anywhere close to enough — I’m guessing not — but this is what the Giants reportedly have on the table:

Anyway, that’s where we are as we begin Thanksgiving week.