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Hanley Ramirez leads Red Sox past Astros 10-3, forces ALDS Game 4

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Red Sox DH Hanley Ramirez had himself a day on Sunday in Game 3 of the ALDS against the Astros. The veteran of 13 seasons went 4-for-4 with a double and three RBI, helping the Red Sox defeat the Astros 10-3 to force Game 4. Ramirez joins Jake Lamb as players to have four-hit games so far this postseason.

The Astros started quick, plating three runs off of Red Sox starter Doug Fister in the top of the first inning. Josh Reddick knocked in the first run with a single and Carlos Correa followed up with a two-run home run with one out. In the top of the second, the Astros nearly had another three-spot. Carlos Beltran walked and Yuli Gurriel singled to open the frame. After getting Brian McCann to line out, manager John Farrell yanked Fister from the game, handing him the shortest ALDS start since 2014. Joe Kelly came in and had his heart sink when Reddick lifted a fly ball to deep right field, but Mookie Betts caught the ball over the wall before it could land, stealing a three-run home run.

From there, it was all Red Sox. They cut the deficit by one with a Sandy Leon RBI single in the bottom of the second against starter Brad Peacock. In the third, the Sox put together a two-out rally. Mitch Moreland doubled, then scored on Ramirez’s single. Francisco Liriano relieved Peacock, then served up a go-ahead two-run home run to Rafael Devers. Devers is the sixth player since 1903 to hit a postseason homer before the age of 21.

David Price came in to relieve Kelly to start the fourth and turned in a stellar performance. His tenure in Boston has been rocky, to say the least, so he needed this and so did the Red Sox. He hurled four shutout innings, yielding four hits and a walk while striking out four on 57 pitches.

The Red Sox broke the game open in the seventh. The first five batters reached base: Andrew Benintendi walked, then Betts and Moreland singled to load the bases. Ramirez then ripped a ground ball double to left-center field, pushing two more runs across for a 6-3 game. Devers then blooped a weak single to shallow left field to score another run. After Leon flied out, Jackie Bradley, Jr. lifted a home run down the right field line that glanced off of the glove of a leaping Reddick, bumping the score to 10-3.

Addison Reed entered in the eighth, working around a two-out Gurriel single for a scoreless frame. Carson Smith came on in the ninth and, despite giving up a pair of singles, had a stress-free time closing out the 10-3 victory.

The series continues on Monday (time to be determined, per MLB.com’s Alyson Footer) with the Astros leading two games to one. The Astros will send Charlie Morton to the hill. The Red Sox have not announced a starter yet.

Dustin Fowler is suing the White Sox over an outfield collision

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Tom Schuba of the Chicago Sun-Times reports that Athletics outfielder Dustin Fowler has filed suit against the White Sox for negligence. Fowler sustained a season-ending injury during a collision at Guaranteed Rate Field last June and is also bringing the lawsuit against the Illinois Sports Facilities Authority agency, as neither party took measures to secure the ballpark’s unpadded electrical box that exacerbated his injuries.

The 22-year-old outfielder was just two outs into his major league debut with the Yankees when the incident occurred. Fowler tracked a Jose Abreu foul ball down the first base line and flipped over the short railing. He was noticeably limping after colliding with a knee-high electrical box at the wall and collapsed to the ground within seconds before being carted off the field.

The official diagnosis: a ruptured patellar tendon and season-ending surgery on his right knee. Per Schuba’s report, which can be read here in full, Fowler has claimed “‘severe and permanent’ external and internal injuries, as well as mental pain and anguish” following the collision.

No specific demands have been publicized yet. Fowler is said to be seeking money from both the White Sox and the Sports Facilities Authority, likely enough to cover the “large sums” he spent on medical care for the surgery and related treatments.