Make it 20 wins in a row for the Cleveland Indians

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Death. Taxes. The Cleveland Indians winning baseball games. They did it again tonight, beating the Detroit Tigers 2-0 for their 20th straight win. That ties the 2002 Oakland A’s for the American League record for consecutive wins.

This one was close on the scoreboard but easy in practice. That’s because the Tribe sent ace Corey Kluber out against the lowly Tigers this evening and he dominated, tossing a complete game shutout, allowing five hits and striking out eight without walking a batter. The win upped his record to 16-4 and reduced his ERA to 2.44 on the year. Francisco Lindor‘s first inning homer was all the scoring Cleveland would need, but they got a second run in the sixth inning on a Drew VerHagen wild pitch which scored Carlos Santana.

The Indians won their 89th game on the season and, given that the Twins are cruising right now, will allow them to maintain their 14-game lead in the AL Central. I think they got this one wrapped up, folks.

Cleveland will go for sole possession of the AL consecutive wins record in tomorrow afternoon’s game against the Tigers. The all-time record without any ties belongs to the 1935 Chicago Cubs, who won 21 straight, which the Indians can tie tomorrow as well.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.