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The Nats-Giants brawl likely ended Michael Morse’s career

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Giants’ infielder/outfielder Michael Morse is likely out for the remainder of the season, reports Alex Pavlovic of NBC Sports Bay Area. Morse sustained a concussion and bruised ribs following a collision with Jeff Samardzija during the infamous Hunter Strickland/Bryce Harper brawl back in May, and it appears that he has not yet made a full recovery. He’s expected to join the team on their road trip in Miami next week, but his chances of making a full comeback — in this season or any other — seem slim to none at this point.

Prior to the Memorial Day melee, Morse slashed an underwhelming .194/.250/.306 with one home run in 40 PA with San Francisco. Even before he inadvertently used his head to block Samardzija from sucker punching Harper, it looked like 2017 would be the final encore to a 13-year Major League career, one that had petered out after the 35-year-old took a six-game gig with the 2016 Pirates.

He was officially placed on the 10-day disabled list on June 8 but, as of August 11, has yet to take any kind of rehab assignment with the team. According to the Mercury News’ Andrew Baggarly, manager Bruce Bochy told reporters that he does not intend to reinstate Morse on the active roster come September, a decision that will likely bring Morse’s career to its unfortunate and unusual end. The rest of the Giants, meanwhile, are scheduled to take on the Nationals in their first meeting since that holiday weekend, and will kick off a three-game set in Washington on Friday at 7:05 ET.

Aaron Judge was involved in a weird play in the fourth inning

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Yankees outfielder Aaron Judge found himself front-and-center in a weird play in the bottom of the fourth inning during Game 4 of the ALCS on Tuesday evening. Judge drew a walk to lead off the frame. After Didi Gregorius lined out, Gary Sanchez flied out to shallow right-center.

Judge must have thought the ball had a high probability of falling in for a hit, so he was past the second base bag around the time he realized his mistake. He retraced his steps, running back to first base. Reddick’s throw hopped a couple of times but first base umpire Jerry Meals called Judge out on the tag-up play.

Manager Joe Girardi requested a review and the call was overturned: Judge was safe. However, Astros manager A.J. Hinch wanted to challenge that Judge did not re-touch second base on his way back. Rather than issuing a formal challenge, the Astros had to appeal the play by having starter Lance McCullers throw to second base, at which point second base umpire Jim Reynolds would issue a ruling. McCullers was a bit hasty, though, and made his appeal throw before Greg Bird stepped into the batter’s box. Reynolds told McCullers that he had to wait. So, McCullers again made his appeal throw.

This time, Judge was running and he was simply tagged out at second base for the final out of the inning. No need for a review.

As Ken Rosenthal explained on the FS1 broadcast, the Yankees were trying to “beat the police.” They knew Judge would have been ruled out — replays clearly showed he never re-touched the base — so they had nothing to lose by sending Judge. If he was safe, the Astros would no longer be able to appeal the play. If he’s out, then it’s the same outcome they would have had anyway.