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Bartolo Colon pitched a historic complete game win

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It’s difficult to talk about Bartolo Colon without making some mention of his age. At 44 years and 72 days old, the Twins’ veteran right-hander is the oldest active alumnus of the Montreal Expos, the oldest pitcher to hit a home run (2016, age 42), the third 40-something to strike out three batters on Opening Day (2015, age 41), the first 40-something to start a season with four straight wins (2015, age 41), and in general just the oldest active player in Major League Baseball, period.

On Friday night, he did it again, pitching a nine-inning complete game win to become the oldest right-handed starter with a complete game since 1994 (Charlie Hough, age 46), the oldest pitcher to toss a complete game against the Rangers since 1988 (Tommy John, age 45), the oldest American League pitcher to win a complete game since 1992 (Nolan Ryan, age 45), the oldest pitcher with a complete game since 2010 (Jamie Moyer, age 47) and the oldest Twins pitcher to ever record a complete game.

If there’s one thing that Colon has proven time and time again, however, it’s that age is irrelevant.

He dominated the Rangers during Friday’s 8-4 win, striking out five of 36 batters and yielding four runs on nine hits and a walk. Colon expended 14 pitches in the first inning, slipping a two-RBI single to Adrian Beltre as the Rangers mounted an early 2-0 lead. The Twins quickly erased the deficit in the bottom of the inning, scoring four off of opposing starter Martin Perez and chasing him out of the game by the fifth.

Colon allowed another RBI single in the third inning, this one a two-out line drive by Nomar Mazara, but rebounded with five consecutive scoreless frames as the Twins built their five-run lead. In the ninth inning, with two outs and the win in sight, the righty served up an 0-1 changeup to Carlos Gomez for the Rangers’ first and only home run of the evening, then retired Brett Nicholas to clinch the win.

The win marked Colon’s first victory with the Twins and third of the 2017 season. He’s not a spring chicken, to be sure. But his age isn’t the most interesting thing about him, and (7.70 ERA and 0.3 fWAR aside) it’s certainly not preventing him from seeing results on the mound.

Clayton Kershaw could return on September 1

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Dodgers starter Clayton Kershaw has been out since July 24 with a lower back strain. He’s slated to throw a three-inning simulated game in Pittsburgh on Monday, per Bill Plunkett of the Orange County Register. Plunkett adds that if all goes well, the earliest Kershaw could return is August 31 against the Diamondbacks, but September 1 is more likely against the Padres.

Kershaw, 29, hit the disabled list on a pace to win his fourth Cy Young Award. He’s 15-2 with a 2.04 ERA and a 168/24 K/BB ratio in 141 1/3 innings.

The Dodgers have managed just fine without Kershaw. The club is 19-4 since July 24. At 87-35, the Dodgers own baseball’s best record, well ahead of the second-best Astros at 76-48.

Ian Kinsler was fined for ripping umpires publicly. Brad Ausmus says it’s the largest fine he’s seen in 25 years.

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Last week, Tigers second baseman Ian Kinsler was ejected from a game against the Rangers after giving home plate umpire Angel Hernandez a look after a pitch was thrown outside for a ball. Kinsler was apparently unhappy with calls Hernandez had made earlier. Manager Brad Ausmus, too, was ejected.

After the game, Kinsler said that Hernandez “needs to find another job.” He added, “…he needs to stop ruining baseball games.”

Kinsler was fined by Major League Baseball for his remarks, Mlive’s Evan Woodbery reports. According to Ausmus, the fine levied on Kinsler was the largest one he’s seen in nearly 25 years in baseball. Kinsler said, “I said what I felt and what I thought. If they take offense to that, then that’s their problem.” Ausmus said, “To single out one player as a union is completely uncalled for.”

As Ashley noted on Saturday, the umpires wore white wristbands to protest “escalating attacks on umpires.” The umpires agreed to drop their protest on Sunday after commissioner Rob Manfred agreed to meet with the umpire union’s governing board, Gabe Lacques of USA TODAY Sports reports.