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Aaron Judge jersey sells for a record $157K

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The mania surrounding Home Run Derby champ Aaron Judge appears to have reached a new high. ESPN’s Darren Rovell reports that Judge’s game-worn MLB debut jersey sold for $157,366 on Sunday, eclipsing the price of any other game-worn jersey since 2002. That record doesn’t just encompass all MLB jerseys, but those across every professional sport in the U.S., including one of Steph Curry’s jerseys from the 2017 NBA Finals.

There’s no telling how long Judge will continue to mash home runs and obliterate single-season records, and while his league-best 33 homers and dazzling .305/.428/.638 batting line have turned heads, there’s a chance he’s due for a sophomore slump next year. That uncertainty, coupled with the rookie’s undeniable popularity, has continued to drive up the price for jerseys, rookie cards, bats — anything anyone can get their hands on. In addition to Judge’s MLB debut jersey, which went to merchandiser Steiner Sports, Rovell lists several other pieces of memorabilia that could fetch a hefty price:

Memory Lane recently acquired a Judge-used Double-A uniform that it is hoping to sell for $25,000. Goldin Auctions, in its next auction, has a Judge game-used jersey and signed game-used cleats, while SCP Auctions is auctioning off a jersey worn by Judge at Fresno State.

Of course, the opposite could be true. Should Judge continue to flourish with the Yankees, these will all look like bargain-bin prices by the end of what very well might be a long and illustrious career.

Update: The total price of Judge’s debut jersey reached $160,644.05 with commission.

Brewers are interested in Jake Arrieta

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Jon Morosi of MLB Network reports that the Brewers may be interested in Jake Arrieta.

The Brewers could definitely use a front line starter, especially with Jimmy Nelson slated to miss a good chunk of next season due to a rotator cuff injury. Arrieta will be expensive, obviously, but the Brewers have a lot more payroll flexibility than most teams, with only minimal money due on long term contracts. Most of that is for Ryan Braun, but even the outlay for him is reasonable, with deferred money involved. Tom Haudricourt of the Journal-Sentinel laid all of that out back in October.

Milwaukee had a surprisingly good 2017 and they have the ability to add in free agency or to take on salary in trades if they want to. Maybe they don’t get Arrieta but they could make a splash this offseason.