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Mets continue to avoid using 10-day disabled list

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Nearly two months ago, I wrote about the weird and inefficient way in which the Mets have handled injured players. The new collective bargaining agreement reduced the minimum stay on the disabled list from 15 to 10 days, which creates an incentive for teams and players to appropriately deal with injuries. With a 15-day minimum, teams and players would often hide or ignore minor injuries and the player would simply sit on the bench, eating up the utility of that roster spot.

Every team has seemed to take advantage of the new 10-day disabled list. That is, except the Mets. In my previous article, I listed a handful of examples. One was catcher Travis d'Arnaud, whose wrist was injured April 19 against the Phillies. He didn’t start in the next four games, but did appear as a pinch-hitter each game. He started on the 26th but could only make it through five innings. He left after six innings on May 2 against the Brewers. At the time of that writing — May 4 — d’Arnaud still hadn’t been put on the DL, but he finally went on May 5 and was activated on the 24th. Other examples included Yoenis Cespedes and Lucas Duda. Then there was the whole Noah Syndergaard situation in which he refused to undergo an MRI and the team said that was okay. He started a few days later and lasted 1 1/3 innings before exiting with a torn lat muscle.

Even broadcaster Ron Darling has criticized the Mets for their health woes. He blamed the trainers, as the Mets have had a revolving door in the infirmary.

That brings us to the latest issue. On Sunday against the Giants, Conforto was hit on the left wrist with a pitch. He has been held out of the lineup ever since. And, according to MLB.com’s Anthony DiComo, the Mets still haven’t discussed putting him on the 10-day disabled list. For some simple math, Conforto has been out four days and the minimum stay on the disabled list is 10 days. That’s at least 40 percent inefficient! If the Mets had played it safe with Conforto and put him on the disabled list immediately, they would not have had a dead roster spot for four days. The Mets could have called up a player from Triple-A to have an extra bat off the bench. That might have, for instance, had an impact during Tuesday’s 6-3 loss to the Marlins.

The only upside to not placing a player on the disabled list is having that player available within the 10 days the player would otherwise be missing. If the injury only requires a week of rest, for instance, then the Mets technically would gain three days of time with the player in question on the active roster. That comes at the cost of that player’s roster spot being dead for the other seven days, though. Is it worth it? The Mets seem to be the only team on that side of the argument.

Report: Blue Jays and Marco Estrada nearing agreement on contract extension

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Jon Morosi reports that the Blue Jays and starter Marco Estrada are nearing an agreement on a contract extension. The deal is expected to be for one guaranteed year, Morosi adds.

Estrada, 34, was set to become a free agent after the season. He earned $26 million on a two-year contract signed with the Jays in November 2015. While the right-hander has a subpar 4.84 ERA on the season, he has a solid 170/67 K/BB ratio in 176 2/3 innings and has looked much better since the end of July. Between July 31 and his most recent start on Saturday, Estrada owns a 3.75 ERA.

J.A. Happ is the only other starter technically under contract with the Jays next season. Marcus Stroman will be eligible for his second year of arbitration and the Jays will certainly agree to give him a raise on his $3.4 million salary for the 2017 season. The Jays will likely be active this offseason in adding rotation help and they’re starting early by locking up Estrada.

Video: Jackie Bradley, Jr. robs Chris Davis of a home run

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Red Sox center fielder Jackie Bradley, Jr. robbed Orioles first baseman Chris Davis of his 25th home run on Tuesday evening, leaping at the fence in center field to make the catch and keep the game scoreless in the bottom of the fifth inning.

Davis swung at the first pitch he saw from Drew Pomeranz, a slider that crossed the middle of the plate.

This game has potential playoff implications, as the first-place Red Sox hold a three-game lead over the Yankees in the NL East. Meanwhile, the Orioles are still in the AL Wild Card race, trailing the Twins by 5.5 games for the second Wild Card slot.