Bruce Bochy: Joe Maddon doesn’t know what he’s talking about regarding catcher collisions

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Joe Maddon is not a fan of any of the rules aimed at protecting fielders from aggressive slides from baserunners. He doesn’t like the rule about breakup slides at second base — he’s reacted angrily when his own baserunners have been involved in controversies surrounding the application of that rule — and he doesn’t like the rule aimed at stopping collisions at home.

Yesterday Joe Maddon took to the airwaves on Chicago’s 670 The Score to defend Anthony Rizzo’s slide into Austin Hedges on Monday night. In the course of his interview, he took new aim at the catcher collision rule, chalking it all up to Buster Posey‘s season ending injury in 2011:

“I’m really confused by why it gained so much attention only except for the fact that Buster Posey got hurt a couple years ago. Other than that, if it was a third-string catcher for the Atlanta Braves that got hurt three years ago, this (rule) wouldn’t even be in existence . . . it’s all precipitated by one play that happened several years ago that to me was just bad technique on the part of the catcher, so that’s where I get really flustered by this conversation, because to me it should not even exist.”

Someone told Giants Bruce Bochy about Maddon’s comments. He didn’t refer to Maddon by name, but his response was pretty pointed for the usually friendly world of manager-on-manager discourse. From the San Francisco Chronicle:

“I don’t really care to visit it. I don’t. Anybody who goes into that, they don’t know what they’re talking about where Buster was at on that play . . . I wish the guys who make these comments were standing there when Todd Greene got hurt and say the same thing.”

Greene was the Giants catcher in the mid-2000s whose career was cut short by a shoulder injury after Prince Fielder plowed into him at home.

Maddon is not entirely wrong with his reference to Posey. The catcher collision rule did not go into effect until three years after Posey’s injury, so it certainly wasn’t some kneejerk reaction to him breaking his leg, but it is fair to say that Posey’s injury significantly moved the ball forward with respect to protecting catchers. Indeed, the conversation about all of that was almost nonexistent before Posey’s injury. Todd Greene did not get people talking about it, that’s for sure. Posey’s injury did.

Beyond that narrow point, however, Maddon is full of crap here. For one thing, Posey did not break his leg because of “bad technique.” He broke it because Scott Cousins intentionally slammed into him while trying to score. A legal play at the time but one which was going to lead inevitably to serious injury. It was a bad setup all around which the collision rule was designed to eradicate. Has it done it perfectly? No, it’s a hard rule to implement, but it’s a step in the right direction.

Beyond that, laying all of this at Buster Posey’s feet, or the feet of a league that allegedly overreacted due to the injury of a superstar, is dumb. Whatever the impetus for the rule — and if it wasn’t Posey, it certainly would’ve been someone else given the radical shift in opinion about concussions and sports injuries in general — it’s a smart rule. Baseball is not a contact sport and a catcher-runner collision is not some necessary part of the game, even if it had become a customary one.

Joe Maddon is a pretty smart guy who gets a lot of kudos for being an open-minded innovator. But this old school streak of his regarding collisions is wrongheaded.

Report: Raul Mondesi sentenced to eight years in prison for corruption as mayor of San Cristobal

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Former major league outfielder Raul Mondesi has been sentenced to eight years in prison and fined 60 million pesos for corruption as mayor of San Cristobal in the Dominican Republic, Hector Gomez reports. Mondesi served a six-year term as mayor from 2010-16. He initially ran on the ballot of the Dominican Liberation Party, but switched to the Dominican Revolutionary Party over a year later.

Mondesi, 46, played parts of 13 seasons in the majors for the Dodgers, Blue Jays, Yankees, Diamondbacks, Pirates, Angels, and Braves. He won the NL Rookie of the Year Award in 1994 with the Dodgers, made one All-Star team, and won two Gold Glove Awards. He is the father of the Royals infielder of the same name.

Sherwin Williams is trying to back out of a charitable contribution at Angel Stadium

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The paint company Sherwin Williams created a neat promotion at Angel Stadium. There’s a giant paint can with the brand name in left-center field. If a player hits a ball into the can, Sherwin Williams will donate $1 million to the Angels Baseball Foundation, the Angels’ charity for kids.

Angels outfielder Justin Upton appeared to trigger that charitable contribution when he hit a solo home run to left-center field against Indians closer Cody Allen on Tuesday night. The ball bounced in front of the can and then went in on a hop.

ESPN reports that Sherwin Williams is using a technicality to try and get out of the obligation. Because Upton’s home run didn’t land in the can on the fly, Sherwin Williams is saying they’re not obliged to make the $1 million donation. In 2014, Frazee Paint and the Angels agreed to the paint can promotion and indeed the press release says, “…if an Angels player hits a home run that lands in the can on the fly, the company will make a $1 million donation to benefit the Foundation’s efforts to improve the lives of children in the community.” Frazee Paint is now owned by Sherwin Williams.

According to Forbes, Sherwin Williams is worth $29.2 billion, ranking at 724 on the Global 2000. One would imagine ponying up the relatively minuscule sum of $1 million would be worth it rather than taking the P.R. hit from the dozens of articles that have been and will continue to be written about the company’s pedantry over a charitable donation to needy children.

MLB is currently not allowing the video to be embedded so here’s the link if you want to watch it.