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Cody Bellinger sets major league record with 21 home runs through first 51 games

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Cody Bellinger boosted the Dodgers’ lead from 1-0 to 4-0 with a three-run home run against Mets starter Zack Wheeler in the first inning. In doing so, he tied the major league record as the fastest to reach 20 home runs. Bellinger, Gary Sanchez (2016), and Wally Berger (1930) each needed 51 games. Bellinger set a new record in the second inning, belting a solo homer off of Wheeler to boost the Dodgers’ lead to 7-0.

Bellinger didn’t make his major league debut until April 25. Still, Monday’s first-inning homer moved him into a tie with the Brewers’ Eric Thames for the National League lead in home runs at 20. His second-inning blast moved him into the NL lead and tied him with Logan Morrison for second-most overall. Aaron Judge leads with 23.

Bellinger entered Monday’s action batting .261/.333/.628 with 43 RBI, 37 runs scored, and four stolen bases in 210 plate appearances. Pretty good numbers from a guy the Dodgers expected to send back to the minor leagues once their other outfielders got back to full health.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.