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And That Happened: Thursday’s Scores and Highlights

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Here are the scores. Here are the highlights:

Indians 12, Dodgers 5: Lonnie Chisenhall didn’t start this game but he sure as hell helped finish it. The Indians outfielder came in as a pinch hitter in the fifth and smacked a three-run homer. Then he singled in two more runs in the sixth to give him five on the day. The Dodgers’ six-game winning streak was snapped.

Twins 6, Mariners 2: Chris Gimenez hit two homers and Eduardo Escobar homered for the second straight game. He’s 10-for-14 over the past three games, in fact, with five driven in. Jose Berrios allowed two runs over eight innings, dropping his ERA to 2.74 and giving him his sixth win on the year.

White Sox 5, Orioles 2: A four-run sixth inning for the Sox knocked out Chris Tillman and the O’s. Rookie Matt Davidson homered for the fourth straight game. Avisail Garcia and Rick Renteria were both ejected following a called strike on a check swing. Was it because of a crazy, over-the-top argument? Nah. It was because Garcia did this to the first base umpire:

Guess he saw you too, Avisail.

Phillies 1, Red Sox 0: Normally when you allow one run over eight innings and strike out ten you’re gonna win. Yesterday was not normal for Chris Sale and the Red Sox, though, as Phillies starter Nick Pivetta tossed seven shutout innings, striking out nine and Pete Neshek and Hector Neris each tossed a shutout inning in relief. A pinch-hit RBI double for Ty Kelly in the eighth was the game’s only scoring on this very getaway day game.

Nationals 8, Mets 3: Bryce Harper smacked the hardest-hit home run in baseball since they began measuring such things. A laser beam that left his bat at 116.3 miles per hour, only flew 49 feet high and ricocheted off the bleachers and bounced back onto the field:

Michael Taylor homered too and Daniel Murphy continued his usual abuse of his old teammates by getting three hits himself. Oh, and the Mets suffered another injury when Juan Lagares broke his thumb, so this was a red letter day for old New York.

Tigers 5, Rays 3: Miguel Cabrera hasn’t been his usual power hitting self this year. Indeed, coming into this one he hadn’t hit a dinger since May 20th. Here, however, he hit a two-run shot in the bottom of the ninth to give Detroit the walkoff win. They needed to walk if off because Francisco Rodriguez gave up a tying homer in the eighth to Steven Souza. Earlier this week K-Rod had complained about how he was being used since he lost his closing gig. If he thinks it was bad before, he’s in for a rude awakening.

Brewers 6, Cardinals 4: Keon Broxton and Eric Thames each homered, with the former going 489 feet and the latter just barely getting out. They all count, though, and Thames’ was a tie-breaker in the eighth inning to boot. Milwaukee takes the series against St. Louis. That’s the second straight series they’ve taken against the Cardinals after going 17 straight series against them without winning one.

Rockies 10, Giants 9: Your typical Coors Field non-pitcher’s duel, in which the Giants came back from an 8-0 deficit and tying it at nine in the ninth. Things weren’t decided here until rookie Raimel Tapia hit a walkoff RBI single. Nolan Arenado doubled three times and drove in four and D.J. LeMahieu got four hits. The Rockies have won 10 of their last 14. The Giants have lost 10 of their last 14.

Athletics 8, Yankees 7: A wild one, as Oakland took a 3-0 lead by the second and New York tied at three in the sixth. From there on it became tied at 4, at 5 and at 6 and went to extra innings. Khris Davis ended all of that with a walkoff bloop single in the tenth. The A’s end a three-game skid in this four hour and twenty nine minute affair.

Royals 7, Angels 2Lorenzo Cain and Alex Gordon hit solo home runs That’s five straight wins for the Royals, coming in San Diego, San Francisco and Anaheim. The west coast has been the best coast for the Royals. Yep, they have really enjoyed those California nights.

Roberto Osuna reveals he has been dealing with an anxiety issue

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Blue Jays closer Roberto Osuna recently revealed that he has been dealing with an anxiety issue, Rob Longley of the Toronto Star reports. Osuna specified that the issue is completely off the field, not on the field. He is not sure when he’ll be able to return to pitch again.

Osuna had been feeling “a little bit anxious, a little bit weird” and said, “I feel like I’m lost a little bit right now.” Despite the anxiety, Osuna volunteered to pitch during Friday’s loss to the Royals, but the Blue Jays smartly chose not to put him into the game.

Osuna said, “I wish I knew how to get out of here and how to get out of this. We’re working on it. We’re trying to find ways to see what can make me feel better. But to be honest I just don’t know.”

It must have been tough for Osuna to make his issue public, as there is still a stigma around dealing with mental issues. Given the prominent position he holds in the Jays’ bullpen, fans become even less empathetic about taking time off to deal with it as well. Hopefully, Osuna is able to use the time off to get the help he needs. And hopefully his going public helps motivate other people dealing with mental issues to seek help for themselves.

The 22-year-old recently became the youngest player in major league history to reach 75 career saves. This season, Osuna is carrying a 2.48 ERA with 19 saves and a 37/3 K/BB ratio in 39 innings.

Brewers claim Stephen Vogt off waivers from the Athletics

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ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reported on Sunday that the Brewers claimed catcher Stephen Vogt off waivers from the Athletics. Vogt was designated for assignment by the Athletics on Thursday.

Vogt, 32, was an All-Star in each of the last two seasons, but struggled this year. He hit .217/.287/.357 with four home runs and 20 RBI in 174 plate appearances.

With the Brewers, Vogt will likely split time behind the plate with Manny Pina. Meanwhlie, the Athletics’ catching situation will be handled by Josh Phegley and Bruce Maxwell.