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John McCain says the Dbacks-Padres game messed up his questions to James Comey

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Today, when I was not sticking to sports, I was watching the James Comey hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee. It was good stuff. If you missed it, just ask your friends! Your friends on the left will tell you that it immediately calls for the impeachment and or disembowelment of Donald Trump. Your friends on the right will tell you that the hearing firmly establishes that Hillary Clinton is America’s Greatest Monster.

You know, the usual.

Senator John McCain was the last one to ask the former FBI director questions. His questions were . . . somewhat confusing. While there were a lot of Republican senators who talked about Comey’s actions with respect to Hillary Clinton, they all seemed to acknowledge that there was no connection between the Russia stuff and Clinton. Rather, it was to lay the groundwork for questions about Comey’s judgment when it came to handling other investigations. McCain, however, truly appeared to conflate the two investigations. Even Comey, who answered all manner of questions without difficulty, said he was confused.

A few minutes ago, apparently acknowledging that he did not come off well, McCain released a statement about his questioning:

The Dbacks played the Padres in Arizona last night. It does seem to have been a slog of a game, lasting three hours and forty-eight minutes and featuring 11 pitchers despite it only going nine innings. While it started at a relatively reasonable time for a viewer in Washington D.C. — 9:40 — it did not end until almost one thirty in the morning.

Here’s hoping that McCain did, in fact, stay up late to watch Fernando Rodney retire Hunter Renfroe and that dedication to his hometown team was the reason for his less-than-lucid questioning of James Comey. Here’s also hoping that, the next time he has a big hearing in the morning, he just goes to bed early and watches the game over breakfast via MLB.tv.

Report: Diamondbacks acquire Steven Souza from Rays; Yankees land Brandon Drury

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Update (6:35 PM ET): This is a three-team deal also involving the Diamondbacks, per Nick Piecoro of the Arizona Republic. The Diamondbacks will receive outfielder Steven Souza from the Rays and second baseman Brandon Drury will head to the Yankees. Lefty reliever Anthony Banda will go to the Rays, Piecoro adds. The Diamondbacks will also receive prospect Taylor Widener from the Yankees, per Joel Sherman of the New York Post. MLB.com’s Steve Gilbert adds that the Rays will get two players to be named later from the D-Backs.

Souza, 28, is earning $3.55 million in his first of three years of arbitration eligibility, so the Rays are presumably saving money in moving him. Last season, Souza hit a productive .239/.351/.459 with 30 home runs, 78 RBI, 78 runs scored, and 16 stolen bases in 617 plate appearances. Souza’s arrival almost certainly pushes Yasmany Tomas out of a starting gig.

Drury, 25, has played a handful of positions in his brief major league career. Last year, he played second base in Arizona, batting .267/.317/.447 with 13 home runs and 63 RBI in 480 PA.

Banda, 24, made his major league debut last season, posting an ugly 5.96 ERA with a 25/10 K/BB ratio in 25 2/3 innings. The peripherals suggest he pitched better than his ERA indicated.

Widener, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the 12th round of the 2016 draft. This past season with High-A Tampa, he pitched 119 1/3 innings and posted a 3.39 ERA with a 129/50 K/BB ratio. MLB Pipeline rated Widener as the 14th-best prospect in the Yankees’ system.

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Robert Murray of FanRag Sports reports that the Rays will acquire second base prospect Nick Solak from the Yankees. The Yankees’ return is presently not known.

Solak, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the second round of the 2016 draft. He spent last season between High-A Tampa and Double-A Trenton, hitting a combined .297/.384/.452 with 12 home runs, 53 RBI, 72 runs scored, and 14 stolen bases.

MLB Pipeline ranked Solak as the eighth-best prospect in the Yankees’ system and the fifth-best second base prospect in baseball, praising him for his ability to hit line drives as well as his speed.