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David Price got into an expletive-filled spat with the media last night

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Yesterday it was reported that David Price would no longer be talking to the media except for on the days he pitches. Yesterday the Red Sox played, but Price did not pitch. Yesterday David Price nonetheless spoke to the media.

And it wasn’t exactly friendly. Here’s Steve Buckley of the Boston Herald passing along his observation of an interaction between Price and CSN New England reporter Evan Drellich after the game:

Following the Sox’ 8-0 loss to the Yankees, as the media was entering a long hallway that leads to the clubhouse, Price asked to speak with former Herald scribe Evan Drellich, who now covers the team for Comcast SportsNet New England.

“Sure,” said Drellich, who fell behind as the rest of the group entered manager John Farrell’s office. Price already was speaking loudly to Drellich when we entered the office. Kevin Gregg, the Sox media relations director, shooed everyone out of the hallway and into the office then closed the door. We still could hear Price yelling.

Then came a second round of yelling, after which Drellich made a comment about Price’s professionalism which led to Sox pitcher Rick Porcello saying something about Drellich’s. Then:

The last words I heard from David Price last night were “(Expletive) them! (Expletive) them all. All of them.”

I presume that Drellich and Price’s conversation was off the record and that we won’t learn what was discussed.

As Bill noted yesterday, there is a long and rich tradition of ballplayers and members of the press having little spats like this.  I’m sympathetic to both sides in different ways when this stuff comes up. For the most part, reporters are trying to do their jobs. When an issue comes up, it’s often because one reporter or a talk radio host or someone crossed some line and the ballplayer decides to take it out on everyone, making everyone’s job harder. By the same token, ballplayers are people too and the press often forgets that, holding them to unreasonable standards and subjecting them to unreasonable scrutiny. I can’t put myself in their shoes, but I tend to be fine with a player who decides, for whatever reason, that he doesn’t want to speak to the media.

All of that said: if you decide to stop talking to the media, maybe consider actually not talking to the media at all? Because when you do, stuff like this happens.

Rockies acquire Zac Rosscup from Cubs

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The Rockies announced a minor swap of relief pitchers on Monday evening. The Cubs sent lefty Zac Rosscup to the Rockies in exchange for right-hander Matt Carasiti.

Rosscup, 29, was designated for assignment by the Cubs last Thursday. He spent only two-thirds of an inning in the majors this year and has a 5.32 career ERA across 47 1/3 innings. Rosscup has spent most of the season with Triple-A Iowa, posting a 2.60 ERA in 27 2/3 innings.

Carasiti, 25, spent 15 2/3 innings in the majors last year, putting up an ugly 9.19 ERA. With Triple-A Albuquerque this season, he compiled a 2.37 ERA and a 43/13 K/BB ratio in 30 1/3 innings.

U.S. Court of Appeals affirms ruling that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law

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The Associated Press reported that on Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed a district court ruling which holds that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law, just like the major leagues.

In 2015, four minor leaguers sued Major League Baseball, alleging that MLB violated antitrust laws with its hiring and employment policies. They accused MLB of “restrain[ing] horizontal competition between and among” franchises and “artificially and illegally depressing” the salaries of minor league players.

The U.S. Court of Appeals said the players failed to state an antitrust claim, as the Curt Flood Act of 1998 exempted Minor League Baseball explicitly from antitrust laws.

This case is separate from the Aaron Senne case in which Major League Baseball is accused of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act. That case was recertified as a class action lawsuit in March. In December, Major League Baseball established a political action committee (PAC), which came months after two members of Congress sought to change language in the FLSA so that minor league players could continue to be paid substandard wages.