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And That Happened: Wednesday’s Scores and Highlights


Here are the scores. Here are the highlights:

Blue Jays 7, Athletics 5: Josh Donaldson hit a tie-breaking two-run homer in the 10th. Brett Lawrie, I dunno, sat in his house and binge-watched season two of “Master of None” last night, very satisfied with the season overall, but somewhat troubled at the overly-dramatic and contrived conclusion to the Dev-Francesca arc which, while potentially satisfying in another context, was tonally off compared to the show’s otherwise grounded milieu.

Orioles 9, Pirates 6: Trey Mancini rode pine for eight innings before coming in as a pinch hitter in the ninth. He tied the game with a two-run homer there, stayed in the game, and hit a three-run walkoff homer in the 11th. I think we should all take this as an excuse to come in late to work today, telling our bosses that it’s not how you begin the day that matters, but how you end it.

Rays 3, White Sox 1: Rays starter Jacob Faria made his big league debut last night. All he did was take a three-hitter into the seventh inning for his first big league win. After the game, Faria called this the “best two-week span of my life.” The game story then goes on to note that, in a two week period in late May and early June 2011, Faria was drafted by the Rays and then got engaged to be married. I feel like whoever wrote that story was throwing some subtle shade, trying to get Faria in trouble with the missus.

Dodgers 2, Nationals 1: Clayton Kershaw (7 IP, 3 H, 1 ER, 9K) and Stephen Strasburg (6 IP, 3 H, 2 R, 1 ER, 8K) had themselves a pitcher’s duel. Kershaw won it, but it he got an assist from Nats catcher Jose Lobaton, who allowed Adrian Gonzalez to reach on a passed ball strike three. Yasmani Grandal then drove him in with a tiebreaking RBI double in the sixth.

Rockies 8, Indians 1: Colorado wins its fourth in a row as Nolan Arenado drove in three runs and Charlie Blackmon drove in two more. That was plenty of support for Kyle Freeland, who allowed only one run on six hits while pitching into the seventh. His counterpart, Trevor Bauer, didn’t do so hot. His diagnosis included an ~executed pitches~ moment:

Got myself in trouble by walking people. When I got in jams I feel like I executed pitches to try and get out of them and did the best I could to minimize the damage. The ball didn’t go to people today. I don’t know why.”

I don’t read all the postgame quotes, but any time any of you see some ~executed pitches~ talk, please let me know.


Yankees 8, Red Sox 0: CC Sabathia tossed eight shutout innings in the Year of Our Lord 2017, conclusively proving that there is, indeed, life after death. Chris Carter — who has been mostly dead all season — hit a three-run homer and drove in a fourth run with a single. Then again, there’s a big difference between mostly dead and all dead. Mostly dead is slightly alive.

Tigers 4, Angels 0: Buck Farmer has made two starts this year. The first one, on May 27, featured him pitching shutout ball into the seventh, striking out 11. This one featured him pitching shutout ball into the seventh, striking out five. Farmer left the game with a 1-0 lead, but Justin Upton provided a bunch of insurance with a three-run homer in the eighth.

Reds 6, Cardinals 4: St. Louis had a 4-1 lead in the seventh, but the Reds rallied for five in the bottom half of that inning, thanks mostly to Patrick Kivlehan‘s  pinch-hit three-run homer. Big day for the late arrivers yesterday. The Cardinals, who have been killed by utility guys two nights in a row, have lost six in a row.

Braves 14, Phillies 1Mike Foltynewicz has always had amazing stuff, but like a lot of young fireballers, he hasn’t always been able to control it. If his last two starts are any indication, he’s figuring it out. Foltynewicz tossed seven shutout innings for the second game in a row. Nick Markakis hit three RBI doubles, driving in five as the Braves romped

Mets 4, Rangers 3: The Mets starting pitching was supposed to be their strength coming into the season but for various reasons it’s been their achilles heel. Zack Wheeler, however, helped straighten things out, at least for a night, with seven innings of one run ball. Jay Bruce helped with two homers which drove in three of the Mets’ four runs. Despite all of that it still took a ninth inning error by the Rangers to allow the Mets to score the go-ahead run.

Marlins 6, Cubs 5J.T. Realmuto and Marcell Ozuna homered as the Marlins avoid the sweep. Addison Russell had the night off. Yep, just a relaxing night off in which he could clear is mind and sharpen the saw, as the motivational types say. He should be good to go today, refreshed and renewed for the dog days just around the corner, with nothing to trouble his mind.

Brewers 6, Giants 3: Jimmy Nelson had been lights out his last two starts. He wasn’t as sharp last night against the Giants as he was against the Dodgers and Dbacks in those outings, but he still got the job done, scattering seven hits and allowing three runs over seven innings. Sometimes a pitcher just needs some help. Nelson got it from Jesus Aguilar, who went 2-for-4 and drove in the go-ahead run with a two-out double in the fifth.

Royals 7, Astros 5Jason Vargas scattered six hits over five innings. Cheslor Cuthbert drove in three and Lorenzo Cain hit a solo homer. The Royals were likely happy to have avoided Dallas Keuchel, who was scratched before the game with an unspecified illness that involved barfing and stuff due to what sounds like stomach flu.

Diamondbacks 7, Padres 4Jake Lamb and Brandon Drury homered in the Snakes’ five-run third inning to back Zack Greinke, who wasn’t as sharp as usual but still got the win. The Padres have dropped four straight.

Mariners 6, Twins 5: Mike Zunino hit two homers, his second one a two-run shot with two outs in the bottom of the ninth, giving Seattle a walkoff come-from-behind win. Kyle Seager and Carlos Ruiz also homered as the M’s win their ninth in ten games.

Wayne Huizenga, founding owner of the Marlins, dies at 80

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MIAMI (AP) H. Wayne Huizenga, a college dropout who built a business empire that included Blockbuster Entertainment, AutoNation and three professional sports franchises, has died. He was 80.

Huizenga (HY’-zing-ah) died Thursday night at his home, Valerie Hinkell, a longtime assistant, said when reached at the family residence Friday. She gave no details on a cause of death.

Starting with a single garbage truck in 1968, Huzienga built Waste Management Inc. into a Fortune 500 company. He purchased independent sanitation engineering companies, and by the time he took the company public in 1972, he had completed the acquisition of 133 small-time haulers. By 1983, Waste Management was the largest waste disposal company in the United States.

The business model worked again with Blockbuster Video, which he started in 1985 and built into the leading movie rental chain nine years later. In 1996, he formed AutoNation and built it into a Fortune 500 company.

Huizenga was founding owner of baseball’s Florida Marlins and the NHL Florida Panthers – expansion teams that played their first games in 1993. He bought the NFL Miami Dolphins and their stadium for $168 million in 1994 from the children of founder Joe Robbie, but had sold all three teams by 2009.

The Marlins won the 1997 World Series, and the Panthers reached the Stanley Cup Finals in 1996, but Huizenga’s beloved Dolphins never reached a Super Bowl while he owned the team.

“If I have one disappointment, the disappointment would be that we did not bring a championship home,” Huizenga said shortly after he sold the Dolphins to New York real estate billionaire Stephen Ross. “It’s something we failed to do.”

Huizenga earned an almost cult-like following among business investors who watched him build Blockbuster Entertainment into the leading video rental chain by snapping up competitors. He cracked Forbes’ list of the 100 richest Americans, becoming chairman of Republic Services, one of the nation’s top waste management companies, and AutoNation, the nation’s largest automotive retailer. In 2013, Forbes estimated his wealth at $2.5 billion.

For a time, Huizenga was also a favorite with South Florida sports fans, drawing cheers and autograph seekers in public. The crowd roared when he danced the hokey pokey on the field during an early Marlins game. He went on a spending spree to build a veteran team that won the World Series in the franchise’s fifth year.

But his popularity plummeted when he ordered the roster dismantled after that season. He was frustrated by poor attendance and his failure to swing a deal for a new ballpark built with taxpayer money.

Many South Florida fans never forgave him for breaking up the championship team. Huizenga drew boos when introduced at Dolphins quarterback Dan Marino’s retirement celebration in 2000, and kept a lower public profile after that.

In 2009, Huizenga said he regretted ordering the Marlins’ payroll purge.

“We lost $34 million the year we won the World Series, and I just said, `You know what, I’m not going to do that,”‘ Huizenga said. “If I had it to do over again, I’d say, `OK, we’ll go one more year.”‘

He sold the Marlins in 1999 to John Henry, and sold the Panthers in 2001, unhappy with rising NHL player salaries and the stock price for the team’s public company.

Huizenga’s first sports love was the Dolphins – he had been a season-ticket holder since their first season in 1966. But he fared better in the NFL as a businessman than as a sports fan.

He turned a nifty profit by selling the Dolphins and their stadium for $1.1 billion, nearly seven times what he paid to become sole owner. But he knew the bottom line in the NFL is championships, and his Dolphins perennially came up short.

Huizenga earned a reputation as a hands-off owner and won raves from many loyal employees, even though he made six coaching changes. He eased Pro Football Hall of Famer Don Shula into retirement in early 1996, and Jimmy Johnson, Dave Wannstedt, interim coach Jim Bates, Nick Saban, Cam Cameron and Tony Sporano followed as coach.

Harry Wayne Huizenga was born in the Chicago suburbs on Dec. 29, 1937, to a family of garbage haulers. He began his business career in Pompano Beach in 1962, driving a garbage truck from 2 a.m. to noon each day for $500 a month.

One customer successfully sued Huizenga, saying that in an argument over a delinquent account, Huizenga injured him by grabbing his testicles – an allegation Huizenga always denied.

“I never did that. The guy was a deputy cop. It was his word against mine, a young kid,” he told Fortune magazine in 1996.

Huizenga was a five-time recipient of Financial World magazine’s “CEO of the Year” award, and was the Ernst & Young “2005 World Entrepreneur of the Year.”

Regarding his business acumen, Huzienga said: “You just have to be in the right place at the right time. It can only happen in America.”

In September 1960, he married Joyce VanderWagon. Together they had two children, Wayne Jr. and Scott. They divorced in 1966. Wayne married his second wife, Marti Goldsby, in April 1972. She died in 2017.

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