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David Price is limiting his interactions with the Boston media

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In a column for the Boston Globe, Dan Shaughnessy of all people tries to talk some sense into Red Sox fans when it comes to David Price. As has been discussed frequently here and elsewhere, Price’s relationship with the Boston media and Red Sox fans has been tumultuous since signing a seven-year, $217 million contract in December 2015. Price pitched decently last season, putting up a 3.99 ERA in 35 starts while leading the majors with 230 innings, but he wasn’t the same pitcher who finished as a runner up in 2015 AL Cy Young balloting. He also lost his only playoff start, lasting only 3 1/3 innings in his team’s loss in Game 2 of the ALDS against the Indians.

Shaughnessy spoke to Price in the dugout before Wednesday’s game against the Yankees. He was asked how he liked playing in Boston, and Price deflected, talking about his teammates. Shaughnessy then asked Price if he’s more cautious since coming to Boston. The lefty responded:

I’m not cautious. I’m the same me. I don’t talk to the media every day like I did last year and I guess I get blown up for that. But I was honest with everything they asked me last year and I get blown up for that. So they did this to themselves. Talk to me on the day I pitch and that’s it. There are no more personal interviews. There are no more asking me questions on a personal level. That’s done.

The media is not a monolith, but as a general trend, the media has tended to portray players negatively when they aren’t granted full access. Writers, feeling bitter about their jobs being made marginally more difficult, characterize these players as arrogant and aloof. As a result, fans reading those columns start to believe those characterizations and suddenly that player’s time in that city is made more difficult. Players that do make time for the media are portrayed as good people and positive influences on the team.

Boston is not the only city in which the media has acted this way in the past; any team in a city with a heavy media presence has experienced this. But it has certainly happened in Boston before and it would be a shame if Price were to suffer consequences from the media for prioritizing his mental health and focus. Sadly, Price was stuck between a rock and a hard place: put up with unfair criticisms of his performance and contract, or put up with unfair criticism of his unwillingness to speak to reporters. It feels weird to write this sentence, but: Kudos to Shaughnessy for being the voice of reason.

Carter Capps to undergo surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome

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Dennis Lin of the San Diego Union Tribune reports that Padres pitcher Carter Capps will undergo surgery this offseason to address thoracic outlet syndrome, which doctors believe caused the right-hander’s blood clots. The Padres hope to have him ready by spring training next year.

Capps, 27, underwent Tommy John surgery last year and didn’t debut this season until August 7. He made 11 relief appearances, yielding nine runs on 12 hits and two walks with seven strikeouts in 12 1/3 innings. He went back on the DL on September 12 due to the blood clot issue.

The Padres acquired Capps from the Marlins last July in the Andrew Cashner trade which ended up having a lot of moving parts. Capps will enter his third and final year of arbitration eligibility this offseason. It’s quite possible the Padres choose to non-tender him.

Zack Greinke likely to start Wild Card game for Diamondbacks

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Diamondbacks manager Torey Lovullo is considering pushing Zack Greinke‘s next start to this weekend in order to line him up to start the National League Wild Card game on normal rest, Nick Piecoro reports. The D-Backs open up their final series of the season, a three-game set, on Friday against the Royals in Kansas City. Greinke is currently on track to start Wednesday against the Giants and the team has an off day on Thursday.

Robbie Ray has been the Diamondbacks’ best pitcher by several measures, including ERA (2.95) and K/9 (12.3), but Greinke has been quite good himself (3.18) and has nine postseason starts under his belt in his career. He’s acclimated to postseason pressure. The D-Backs also signed Greinke to a $206.5 million contract two years ago, which is likely a factor.

The D-Backs are still waiting to find out which opponent will fly to Arizona for the Wild Card game on October 4. Currently, the Rockies hold a two-game lead over the Brewers and lead the Cardinals by 2.5 games.