Elsa/Getty Images

Mike Schmidt makes public statement regarding the Odubel Herrera controversy

21 Comments

Earlier, Craig wrote about Phillies broadcaster Mike Schmidt criticizing outfielder Odubel Herrera, saying that the 2016 All-Star can’t be a team leader because of the “language barrier.” Understandably, Schmidt received criticism for his comment, made during an appearance on local sports radio.

Schmidt called Herrera personally to apologize, MLB.com’s Todd Zolecki reports. And Schmidt made a statement to the public, as CSN Philly’s John Clark reports:

It’s been made known to me that my answer on a radio interview this morning to the question, “can the Phillies build a team around Odubel Herrera” was disrespectful to Herrera and Latin players in general. I’m very sorry that his misrepresentation of my answer occurred and may have offended someone. I assure everyone I had no intention of that. Odubel is a dynamo on the field, and as he becomes more comfortable with the language, his leadership skills will improve, and no doubt he will be a centerpiece in the Phillies future.

This is not exactly an example of a good apology. Schmidt starts off with, “It’s been made known to me,” which shows us that he still doesn’t see the issue with what he said; rather, he’s going by other people’s reactions to it. A good apology would include recognition of the issue and accepting responsibility.

Schmidt wasn’t taken out of context, either. He was asked if Herrera was a player the Phillies could build around, and the outfielder’s ability — or perceived lack thereof — to communicate was an important factor to Schmidt.

Later, he refers to the blowback as a “misrepresentation of my answer,” which shifts blame from him saying something problematic to other people. Schmidt then says that that misrepresentation “may have offended someone.” So not only are other people at fault for misinterpreting what he said, but they’re also wrong for being offended by it.

Lastly, Schmidt says that Herrera’s leadership will improve “as he becomes more comfortable with the language,” which is basically restating what he said on the radio that got him into trouble in the first place. While Herrera isn’t 100 percent fluent in English, he speaks enough of it to get by, just like thousands of other players who have played the sport. Some of those, like David Ortiz and Adrian Beltre, have become the leaders of their teams. One need not have English as a first language to become a leader.

Clark also reported Herrera’s response. “I don’t agree with his comments. It’s disappointing,” Herrera said.

The Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA vote to make ballots public

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Last year, at the Winter Meetings, the BBWAA voted overwhelmingly to make Hall of Fame ballots public beginning with this year’s election. Their as a long-demanded one, and it served to make a process that has often frustrated fans — and many voters — more transparent.

Mark Feinsand of MLB.com tweeted a few minutes ago, however, that at some point since last December, the Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA’s vote. Writer may continue to release their own ballots, but their votes will not automatically be made public.

I don’t know what the rationale could possibly be for the Hall of Fame. If I had to guess, I’d say that the less-active BBWAA voters who either voted against that change or who weren’t present for it because they don’t go to the Winter Meetings complained about it. It’s likewise possible that the Hall simply doesn’t want anyone talking about the votes and voters so as not to take attention away from the honorees and the institution, but that train left the station years ago. If the Hall doesn’t want people talking about votes and voters, they’d have to change the whole thing to some star chamber kind of process in which the voters themselves aren’t even known and no one discusses it publicly until after the results are released.

Oh well. There’s a lot the Hall of Fame does that doesn’t make a ton of sense. Add this to the list.