And That Happened: Thursday’s Scores and Highlights

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Here are the scores. Here are the highlights:

Cardinals 2, Dodgers 0: For once the pitcher win truly meant something as Adam Wainwright tossed six shutout innings and hit a two-run homer for the only runs in the game. Wainwright is working on a scoreless innings streak of 16.1 and has seen his ERA drop to 3.79 after posting a 6.11 mark in April. Meanwhile, Brandon McCarthy of the Dodgers had to leave after four innings due to blisters.

Indians 8, Athletics 0: Corey Kluber Struck out ten over six shutout innings in his first start since May 2 so, yeah, I think he’s fine. Meanwhile, this happened during the sixth inning:

 

If that happened the day before, Al Gore would’ve magically appeared to lecture the Indians grounds crew about wasting precious water, but as it happened about 20 minutes after Trump pulled out of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change, everyone got bonuses. What a weird world we live in. No matter the case, it didn’t cool down the Indians, who would score one more run that inning after the sprinklers came on and three more in the following inning.

Brewers 2, Mets 1: Chase Anderson pitched seven shutout innings. A batboy probably lost a job, too:

That ended up not mattering — the Mets turned a double play right after missing out on that putout — but it certainly seems like the Baseball Gods don’t want good things for New York lately.

Rockies 6, Mariners 3: Mark Reynolds and Nolan Arenado homered. The M’s saw their four game winning streak snapped but, far worse, saw Nelson Cruz and shortstop Jean Segura leave with injuries. Cruz was hit on the top of his left hand and Segura hurt his right ankle on a slide into second base. Both left the game and will undergo additional tests. Expect updates later today.

Orioles 7, Red Sox 5: Your quintessential AL East slugfest. Mark TrumboChris DavisAdam Jones and Jonathan Schoop all homered for the O’s. Jackie Bradley Jr. hit a three-run homer and Christian Vazquez drove in two for Boston. Why anyone wants to pitch in that division is beyond me.

Yankees 12, Blue Jays 2: Aaron Hicks went 4-for-5 with three doubles and drove in six runs. Gary Sanchez homered twice. CC Sabathia allowed one run while pitching into the seventh to pick up his six win. He’s on pace to go 19-6 this year and pitch 200 innings. Bet you weren’t expecting that.

Diamondbacks 3, Marlins 2: Zack Greinke allowed two runs — only one earned — and struck out eight over seven innings to pick up his seventh win of the year. Meanwhile, Nick Ahmed went 3-for-4 and drove in a couple. Greinke is 5-0 in his career against the Marlins. His comment on that:

“I’ll take that. Their team is pretty good right now. Some years it hasn’t been the best team.”

Greinke is an ace at understatement too.

Twins 4, Angels 2: The Twins turned their first triple play in 11 years. And it wasn’t the dumb kind that involved bad base running. It was a cool around-the-horn job:

 

More importantly, they rallied for three runs in the ninth inning for a comeback win, with one of the runs coming on a bases-loaded walk. Which, as far as defensive stuff goes, is kind of the exact opposite of turning a quick triple play.

Pete Mackanin doesn’t know if he’ll be back as Phillies manager next year

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Back in May the Phillies gave Pete Mackanin a contract extension covering the remainder of 2017, all of 2018 and created a team option for 2019. Yesterday, however, Mackanin said he had no idea if the Phillies were going to bring him back as manager next season:

“I assume I’ll be here, but you never know. You never know what they’re going to do. So you just keep moving on. I just take it a day at a time and manage the way I think I should manage and handle players the way I think I should handle them. That’s all I can do. If it’s not good enough then … fine. I hope it’s good enough. I hope he thinks it’s good enough.”

Maybe that’s just cautious talk, though, as there doesn’t seem to be any signals coming from the Phillies front office that Mackanin is in trouble. If anything things have looked up in the second half of the season with the callups of Rhys Hoskins and Nick Williams each of whom have shown that they belong in the bigs. The team is 33-37 since the All-Star break and is certainly a better team now than the one Mackanin started with in April. And it’s not his fault that they don’t have any pitching.

I suspect Mackanin will be back next year, but Mackanin has been around the block enough times to know that nothing is guaranteed for a big league manager. Even one under contract.

How not to enjoy what Aaron Judge is doing

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Yankees outfielder Aaron Judge has been one of the biggest and best stories in all of baseball this year. While he held promise entering his rookie season, most experts figured he’d provide some low-average, low-OBP power. That he’d be a guy who, based on his size, could send a pitcher’s mistake 500 feet in the wrong direction, but who would probably be shown to have big holes in his swing once he’d been around the league a little bit.

Judge defied expectations, however, and has put together an amazing rookie season. He broke the rookie home run record yesterday with his 50th blast. He still strikes out a lot but so does everyone. He nonetheless has hit for a great average and has gotten on base at a fantastic clip. He has also showed some uncommon resilience, overcoming a lengthy slump in July and August and returning to the dominant form he showed in the first half while helping a Yankees team not many figured to be a strong contender into the playoffs. Such a great story!

Sadly, however, this sentiment, which appeared from a commenter on my Facebook page yesterday, has become increasingly common:

I’ve seen it in a lot of comments sections and message boards around the Internet too, including our own comment section. From yesterday:

This is not exactly the same thing we’ve seen in the past with other breakout home run hitters such as Jose Bautista a few years back. This is not an accusation that Judge is taking drugs or anything. It’s more of a preemptive and defensive diminishment of excitement. And I find it rather sad.

Yes, I understand that past PED users have made fans wonder whether the players they watch are using something to get an extra edge, but it really does not need to be this way. We’ve had drug testing in baseball for over a decade and, while no drug testing regime is perfect, it just seems bizarre, several years after Barry Bonds, Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa did their thing — and a few years after Alex Rodriguez and others were caught and disciplined for trying to do more — to assume, out of hand, that great baseball performances are the product of undetected cheating. Yes, it’s possible, but such assumptions should not be the default stance, only to be disproved (somehow) at a later date.

The same goes for the juiced baseball, right? Yes, there is strong evidence that the baseball was changed a couple of years back leading to a home run spike, but aren’t all players using the same baseball? It’s also worth remembering that the season Mark McGwire hit 49 homers — 1987 — is strongly suspected of being a juiced ball year as well. It’s a concern that may be based in fact, but it’s a large concern over a fact thrown out with little regard for context to sketch out a threat that is either remote or without consequence.

The point here is not to argue that Aaron Judge is undeniably clean or that the baseball isn’t different. The former is unknown and the latter is likely false. The point is that it’s super sad and self-defeating to qualify every amazing feat you see with preemptive concern about such things. Years and years of sports writers writing McCarthy-esque “Yes, but is he clean?” articles does not require you, as a fan, to do the same. You can enjoy a cool thing in the moment. If it’s found out later to have been tainted, fine, we have a lot of practice in contextualizing such things and we’ll do so pretty quickly, but what’s the harm in going with it in real time?

I suspect the answer to that is rooted in some desire not to look like a sucker or something. Not to find oneself like many did, in the mid-2000s, being told by sportswriters and politicians that they were dupes for enjoying Sosa and McGwire in 1998. But that’s idiotic, in my view. I enjoyed 1998 and all of the baseball I saw on either side of it, as did most baseball fans. When the PEDs stuff exploded in the 2000s I reassessed it somewhat as far as the magnitude of the accomplishments compared to other eras in history, but it didn’t mean I enjoyed what I had seen any less.

Likewise, I’ve enjoyed the hell out of watching Aaron Judge this year. Why can’t everyone? Why is it so hard? Why have we been conditioned to be skeptical of something that is supposed to be entertaining? When your personal stakes are low like they are with respect to any sporting event or form of entertainment, it’s OK to enjoy things while they’re enjoyable and worry about them being problematic if and when they ever become so. And hey, they may not!

I promise you: if Aaron Judge walks into the postseason awards banquet this winter carrying a briefcase that unexpectedly opens and 200 syringes full of nandrolone fall out, no one is going to say you were dumb for cheering for him yesterday. It will really be OK.