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Video: Adam Jones shares the player’s point of view


Earlier this month, Orioles outfielder Adam Jones was the recipient of some hateful actions at Fenway Park. One fan attempted to throw peanuts at him while another shouted a racist epithet at him from the center field seats. The Red Sox handled the situation well, apologizing to Jones and vowing to do better than it comes to handling fan misconduct.

Unfortunately, Jones’ story is all too common. Yankees pitcher CC Sabathia backed up Jones’ story, saying he’d only been called the N-word in Boston. Red Sox pitcher David Price said he was the recipient of racist slurs from Boston fans last year when he struggled. Outfielder Jackie Bradley, Jr. said the same when he got off to a slow start in 2014. Barry Bonds, in 2004, said he’d never play in Boston because the city is “too racist for me.” Vernon Wells said Fenway Park was one of the only two stadiums he was warned about where racially motivated comments might occur.

Despite the preponderance of testimony from players past and present, as well as the statistics which show that black people face a totally different reality than white people, Jones still found skeptics. Given his platform, Curt Schilling was the loudest, claiming Jones made the whole thing up for attention.

Jones wrote a short column and shot a video for The Players’ Tribune addressing the situation as well as his skeptics.

Kudos to Jones for continuing to speak up about this. The aim of Jones’ skeptics is not just to dissuade Jones from pressing the issue, but to dissuade other people who face similar issues every day from speaking up. The end result, they hope, is a society that remains unchanged despite its fatal flaws.

Dbacks outfielder Steven Souza injured his right shoulder last night

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Arizona Diamondbacks right fielder Steven Souza dove for a ball in a spring training game last night, missed, and ended up injuring his right shoulder.

It looked bad, too. Center fielder Jarrod Dyson stood over him, frantically waving to the dugout for a trainer as Souza kicked his legs in apparent pain. Souza held his arms awkwardly as he walked off the field. At the moment the Dbacks are calling it a right shoulder strain, but he’ll get an MRI on it today after which a more specific diagnosis will come.

If Souza is out for a while it’s a pretty big blow to Arizona’s 2018 plan. Souza was acquired to help cushion the blow of losing J.D. Martinez in free agency. While not the hitter Martinez is, Souza hit 30 homers in Tampa Bay last year, stood likely to at least match that in the more hitter-friendly confines of Chase Field and, of course, plays superior defense.

Potential replacements for Souza include moving David Peralta from left to right and inserting Yasmany Tomas in left or having fourth outfielder Dyson, or perhaps a platoon of Dyson and utilityman Chris Owings, handle right. Socrates Brito is another internal option.

Obviously the Snakes will wait to hear the results of the MRI before going too deeply into replacement plans, all the while hoping that Souza’s injury is far less serious than it appeared to be last night.