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Great Moments in Inventing Stats to Make Derek Jeter Look Better

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As I’ve said a couple of times in the past 24 hours, it’s possible to say that Derek Jeter is among the all-time greats while still thinking that some people overrate him.

That’s not a slight on Jeter. A player doesn’t “rate” himself, after all. It’s a comment on other people saying things that are unreasonable, separate and apart from whatever it is Derek Jeter did on the field. For example, it’s fair to say that Jeter was one of the best ballplayers of his era and a first-ballot Hall of Famer. Saying he was the best shortstop of all time, however, is simply not accurate by any objective measure and serves to overrate him.

That’s the usual stuff. We’ve heard that for years. On the occasion of his number retirement ceremony last night, some folks are taking it to a new level:

That’s . . . not a thing. And has no bearing on any reasonable assessment of Derek Jeter as an individual player. To the extent one thinks it does, someone needs to be consistent and use the stat to slam Ernie Banks as a bum.

I don’t expect that, though, because the people who say such things about Derek Jeter’s “personal W-L” record are not really invested in that metric as anything meaningful. They simply want to pump up the Jeter hype. To overrate him, for whatever reason.

Kenley Jansen’s consecutive saves streak ends at 34

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Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen gave up three runs in the top of the ninth inning during Sunday’s game against the Braves, blowing his first save since August 26 last season. He had converted 34 consecutive saves.

Jansen yielded back-to-back singles to lead off the ninth inning, staked to a 4-1 lead. After getting two outs, Matt Adams hit a three-run home run down the right field line to knot the game at four apiece.

After Sunday’s lackluster performance, Jansen is now 24-for-25 in save chances this season with a 1.49 ERA and a 62/2 K/BB ratio in 42 1/3 innings.

Zach Britton sets American League record with 55th consecutive save

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Orioles closer Zach Britton finished Sunday’s 9-7 victory over the Astros with a scoreless ninth inning, earning his sixth save of the season. He has now earned the save in 55 consecutive opportunities dating back to September 2015, setting a new American League record. Tom Gordon previously held the record with 54 consecutive saves. Eric Gagne holds the major league record at 84.

Britton’s last blown save came on September 20, 2015, then converted two more saves before the end of the regular season. He went 47-for-47 in save chances last season and is six-for-six so far this year.

Along with his six saves, Britton has a 2.65 ERA and a 13/8 K/BB ratio in 17 innings this season. The lefty came off the disabled list earlier this month after missing two months with a strained left forearm.