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MLB: No, the baseballs aren’t juiced

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Major League Baseball has seen a serious uptick in home runs over the past two seasons. In 2015, the league saw just over one home run hit on average per game. Last season, that jumped up significantly to 1.16 and it stands at 1.18 so far this season — before summer, when more homers are typically hit. During the “steroid era,” the average peaked at 1.17 in 2000 but was mostly in the 1.10-1.14 area.

We’re not seeing outliers like Barry Bonds hitting 73 home runs anymore, but we are seeing the types of players who used to hit 10 home runs now hitting 20 homers (see: Freddy Galvis). For example, in 1999 and 2000, the league saw 100-plus players cross the 20-homer time for the first times in history at 103 and 102, respectively. Last season, 111 players did it for the third triple-digit season league-wide. We’re probably going to see it again this year, too.

With drug-testing as stringent as ever and penalties for testing positive stronger than ever, it’s unreasonable to think that the surge in power is due to players continuing to use performance-enhancing drugs. The most popular theory these days to explain the power surge is a juiced baseball.

Ben Lindbergh of The Ringer asked Major League Baseball about it and they shared their research on the matter. Lindbergh received an 11-page document which detailed the league’s testing methodology and the results. The tests measured the baseballs’ weight, circumference, and coefficient of restitution (elasticity). The results showed that current era baseballs are not noticeably different than baseballs in the past. The league also asked physics professor and baseball physics expert Alan Nathan to independently review their research. Nathan said, “I saw nothing in the data that was presented that suggests that the ball has been altered at all.”

So, that’s that. Both Lindbergh and Nathan are still stumped about the explanation for the power surge, but the data shows that it’s not due to juiced baseballs.

Padres, Mariners join list of teams to extend netting

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The Reds announced earlier that they plan to extend the protective netting at Great American Ball Park in time for Opening Day next season. You can add the Padres and Mariners to what will surely be a growing list.

A young fan was struck in the face by a foul ball at Yankee Stadium on Wednesday, which gave new life to the netting debate. Some fans and media types think Major League Baseball is not doing enough to protect fans. While Major League Baseball has issued guidelines for protective netting, it is ultimately up to the teams to decide just how much netting to use.

Zach Britton receives stem cell injection, likely done for the season

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Orioles closer Zach Britton is likely done for the remainder of the 2017 season after receiving a stem cell injection in his left knee, Peter Schmuck and Jon Meoli of the Baltimore Sun report. Britton has been battling knee problems for most of the season.

The Orioles are still technically in the AL Wild Card race, entering play Thursday 5.5 games behind the Twins for the second Wild Card slot. With only nine games remaining, however, the 73-80 Orioles are likely being realistic about their chances and not taking any unnecessary risks with Britton.

Britton, 29, put up a 2.89 ERA with 15 saves and a 29/18 K/BB ratio in 37 1/3 innings this season. He will be eligible for arbitration for the fourth and final time this offseason.