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Cody Bellinger’s star is shining in Los Angeles. For now.

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Dodgers rookie Cody Bellinger has burst onto the scene in his first eight games in the bigs. He’s 10 for his first 29 with two homers, a double and a triple. He’s walked three times and he’s driven in 5. Last night he was one of the Dodgers many offensive heroes, going 2-for-4 with a triple, two runs scored, and three RBI. This after an age-20 minor league season in which he hit 26 homers in 117 games in Double-A and Triple-A, where the competition tends to be far older.

Even with that production, it’s hard for someone so young to make his mark on a veteran-laden major league club. As such, there’s a very good chance that the young outfielder’s days in the bigs are numbered. At least for now.

Dodgers manager Dave Roberts told reporters last week that Bellinger would return to Triple-A Oklahoma City once Franklin Gutierrez recovered from his hamstring injury and Joc Pederson, who has a groin injury, came off the disabled list. Gutierrez is back (and homered last night). Pederson is due to be activated on Friday. That will likely leave no place for Bellinger, despite the fact that Roberts praised him effusively last night, saying that Bellinger has “done everything he can” to stick around in the majors. Such is the lot of a 21-year-old with options who plays for a contender.

There is one thing worth watching, however, which could give Bellinger a bit more time in the show: Adrian Gonzalez‘s forearm.

Gonzalez has been bothered by a sore forearm all year and he was held out of the starting lineup last night (he did pinch hit and hit an RBI single). There was speculation that he may sit again for tonight’s game against the Giants  If Gonzalez is fine, the Dodgers will likely send Bellinger back to Oklahoma City when Pederson is activated. But if he isn’t fine — and if the Dodgers, who have won seven of 10 want to give him some extra rest to ensure he’s good later in the season — they could DL Gonzalez and allow Bellinger to cover first base for ten more days.

Probably not likely. Gonzalez is not one who takes much time off nor does he seem to like to. And, obviously, no one wants a player to be injured, even to make room for another player. But when you get a ton of enjoyment from watching young stars shine, you try to construct scenarios that allow them to shine a little longer.

So, nothing personal, Adrian, but if you want to take a little break to get your strength back up, we’d all totally understand.

The Red Sox start is ridiculous

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The red-hot Red Sox completed a sweep of the previously red-hot Angels last night, outscoring them 27-3 in their three-game series. Last night’s game was, relatively speaking, a close one, with the Sox winning “only” by six runs. They did manage to strike out Shohei Ohtani three times, though, so some style points help make up for the “squeaker.” Also worth noting that they held Mike Trout of all people to a 3-for-11 line in their three-game series. He did not score a single time and drove in no runs.

That series win puts the Sox at 16-2 on the year. They dropped their Opening Day game to the Rays, but then won their next six games against Tampa Bay, which I’d say makes up for it. In between those two series they swept a two-game series from the Marlins and afterwards they took two of three from the Yankees and three in a row from the Orioles. The only thing that even threatened to slow this juggernaut down is the weather, resulting in a postponement of Monday morning’s Patriot’s Day game. Somewhere in here we should notice that they’re doing this with their starting shortstop and starting second baseman on the disabled list.

As we’ve noted many times, their 16-2 record is the best start in the Red Sox’ 118-year history. It’s also the best start for any team since the 1987 Milwaukee Brewers began 17-1 (let us just forget, for the time being, that those Brewers lost 18 of 20 in May of that year). They are the fourth team since 1961 to win 16 of its first 18 games.

The Sox aren’t simply getting lucky here. They’ve scored 116 runs and have allowed only 50, which is a Pythagorean record of 15-3. They lead all of baseball in offense, scoring 6.44 runs a game, leading individually in average, on-base percentage and slugging. They are only three one hundredths of a run behind the Astros from leading all of baseball in pitching, allowing only 2.78 runs a game. They’re winning all of these games because, in the early going, they’ve simply been that dang much better than everyone they’ve played.

No, the Sox are not going to go 144-18, as they are currently on pace to do. Yes, they are going to find a lot more trouble in their schedule once they play the Orioles, Rays and Marlins less, play a healthier Yankees team more and face off against the Astros, the Blue Jays, the Indians, the Twins and some tougher interleague opponents. This is baseball, obviously, and no one makes it through a season without rough patches, long, short and numerous.

Still: this has been one whale of a start for Boston. Those wins are in the bank. It’s been quite the thing to see.