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Jeb Bush optimistic he and Derek Jeter can close deal for Marlins

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MIAMI (AP) Jeb Bush says he is optimistic he can close a deal to buy the Miami Marlins, with his partner Derek Jeter taking charge of baseball operations.

“Given the interest we have inside Miami and among people that are potential partners, I’m really excited about it,” Bush said, speaking publicly for the first time about his efforts to purchase the team from Jeffrey Loria. “It’s a sport that has huge potential in Miami. I’m excited about the community aspects of this.”

The former Florida governor, who lives in Miami, made his comments Tuesday during a discussion at the Milken Institute Global Conference in Los Angeles.

Jeter and Bush were part of rival efforts to buy the Marlins before joining forces. Jeter was a 14-time All-Star shortstop who retired in 2014 after 20 seasons with the Yankees.

“Derek Jeter is a phenomenal guy, a person of incredible integrity,” Bush said. “I get to meet famous people all the time, and sometimes they don’t match up to what their reputation is. Jeter is the exact opposite. He has this incredible, impeccable reputation he earned, and in person he’s maybe even better. He’s humble, really smart and totally focused on this.

“We have had to make some tough decisions that would require a little conflict. He has made them in a way that has made me feel really good to be his partner, so we’re really excited.”

Jeter has no front office experience, and he would be taking over a team that hasn’t been to the playoffs since 2003. Bush said they agree a free agent spending spree is not the best path forward.

“There is no correlation between high salaries and winning,” Bush said. “The sport is different maybe from others in that regard.”

Bush and Jeter lead one of multiple groups that have submitted bids for the Marlins. Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred said last week none had yet been accepted.

Bush said he expects a decision “pretty soon,” but completion of any sale could take months and would require approval by at least 75 percent of the major league teams.

More than half of the winning bid could involve cash because of MLB’s debt service rule, meaning the Bush-Jeter group would need to raise a lot of money. Their bid is for $1.3 billion, Bloomberg reported.

It is not known who might be joining Bush and Jeter as partners. Bush said he wants to expand the reach of the franchise and MLB in Latin America.

Loria, 76, became unpopular in Miami in part because of the Marlins’ perennially small payrolls, and Bush didn’t sound as though he’ll be a big spender, either.

“Losing money along the way is not the plan,” Bush said. “Baseball doesn’t have a salary cap. You have to have the discipline to identify players the right way. Be patient about it, and use data and analytics the right way.

“Derek is going to be in charge of the baseball. He fully appreciates the need to do this in a patient way.”

Bush, 64, served two terms as governor from 1999-2007 and was an unsuccessful candidate last year for the Republican nomination for president. His brother, former President George W. Bush, was controlling owner of the Texas Rangers from 1989 until he became governor of Texas in 1995.

Jeter, 42, lives in Tampa and has long talked of his desire to own a team.

In the playoffs, the Yankees’ weakness has become their strength

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Two weeks ago, when the playoffs began, the idea of “bullpenning” once again surfaced, this time with the Yankees as a focus. Because their starting pitching was believed to be a weakness — they had no obvious ace like a Dallas Keuchel or Corey Kluber — and their bullpen was a major strength, the idea of chaining relievers together starting from the first inning gained traction. The likes of Luis Severino, who struggled mightily in the AL Wild Card game, or Masahiro Tanaka (4.79 regular season ERA) couldn’t be relied upon in the postseason, the thought went.

That idea is no longer necessary for the Yankees because the starting rotation has become the club’s greatest strength. Tanaka fired seven shutout innings to help push the Yankees ahead of the Astros in the ALCS, three games to two. They are now one win away from reaching the World Series for the first time since 2009.

It hasn’t just been Tanaka. Since Game 3 of the ALDS, Yankees pitchers have made eight starts spanning 46 1/3 innings. They have allowed 10 runs (nine earned) on 25 hits and 12 walks with 45 strikeouts. That’s a 1.75 ERA with an 8.74 K/9 and 2.33 BB/9. In five of those eight starts, the starter went at least six innings, which has helped preserve the freshness and longevity of the bullpen.

Here’s the full list of performances for Yankee starters this postseason:

Game Starter IP H R ER BB SO HR
AL WC Luis Severino 1/3 4 3 3 1 0 2
ALDS 1 Sonny Gray 3 1/3 3 3 3 4 2 1
ALDS 2 CC Sabathia 5 1/3 3 4 2 3 5 0
ALDS 3 Masahiro Tanaka 7 3 0 0 1 7 0
ALDS 4 Luis Severino 7 4 3 3 1 9 2
ALDS 5 CC Sabathia 4 1/3 5 2 2 0 9 0
ALCS 1 Masahiro Tanaka 6 4 2 2 1 3 0
ALCS 2 Luis Severino 4 2 1 1 2 0 1
ALCS 3 CC Sabathia 6 3 0 0 4 5 0
ALCS 4 Sonny Gray 5 1 2 1 2 4 0
ALCS 5 Masahiro Tanaka 7 3 0 0 1 8 0
TOTAL 55 1/3 35 20 17 20 52 6

In particular, if you hone in on the ALCS starts specifically, Yankee starters have pitched 28 innings, allowing five runs (four earned) on 13 hits and 10 walks with 20 strikeouts. That’s a 1.61 ERA.

While the Yankees’ biggest weakness has become a strength, the Astros’ biggest weakness — the bullpen — has become an even bigger weakness. This is why the Yankees, who won 10 fewer games than the Astros during the regular season, are one win away from reaching the World Series and the Astros are not.