Associated Press

Report: Derek Jeter, Jeb Bush join forces in their efforts to purchase the Miami Marlins

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A couple of weeks ago reports emerged that Derek Jeter and Jeb Bush were forming competing groups with the intent of purchasing the Miami Marlins. Clark Spencer of the Miami Herald reports today that Jeb and Jetes are joining forces:

The former Florida governor and retired New York Yankees star once were rivals for the Major League Baseball franchise but now have teamed up to try and buy the team, the sources said. They are competing against a New York financier named Wayne Rothbaum, manager of Quogue Capital, a source close to the situation said. It is not known if other would-be suitors of the Marlins remain in the hunt.

Who else may be in the ownership group is unknown, but there are likely some silent and less-famous partners as well. Because while, obviously, Bush and Jeter are wealthy men, the Marlins are likely to sell for over a billion bucks, and that’s more than just pocket change.

Obviously, however, the sale of a Major League Baseball team is not simply the matter of picking the highest bidder. Major League Baseball has to approve of the winning ownership group and there are a lot of business and political factors which come into play with that stuff. Who will play well with the other owners and the league being a primary consideration.

Given Jeter’s baseball bonafides, Jeb’s political background and, of course, given that his big brother George once owned a baseball team and that his ownership tenure pleased the Powers that Be, one would have to think that if Jetes’ and Jeb’s bid wasn’t the highest, it still might be the most favorable one in the eyes of those Powers that Be.

How Yu Darvish tipped his pitches during the World Series

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You hear a lot about pitchers tipping pitches. It’s often offered up post-facto as an excuse for poor performance by the pitcher himself or his own team. It’s sort of like the “best shape of my life” thing being offered in the offseason to talk about why the player got injured or played badly the previous year. “Smitty’s stuff is still great, he was just tipping his pitches,” said a source close to the player whose stuff is not really great anymore.

Which isn’t to say that pitchers don’t tip pitches. Of course they do. Opposing teams look for it, pick up on it and take advantage of it whenever they can. It’s just that (a) the opposing team has an interest in not talking about it, lest the pitcher STOP tipping its pitches; and (b) the guy actually tipping his pitches doesn’t want to talk specifically about it lest he starts doing it again.

Which is what makes this article at Sports Illustrated so interesting. In it Tom Verducci talks to an anonymous Houston Astros player who explains how Dodgers starter Yu Darvish was tipping his pitches during the World Series, leading to him getting absolutely shellacked in Games 3 and 7. The upshot: the Astros knew when a slider or a cutter was coming, they waited for it and they teed off.

Darvish is a free agent now. I’m guessing, whoever signs him, knows exactly what they’ll gave him work on the first day of spring training.