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Jose Reyes ex-mistress claims he lived “a double life”

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Last year Bartolo Colon made headlines when it was revealed that he was involved in a court case regarding child support for his “secret family.” Which is a tabloid-sensationalized way of referring to children he had with a mistress. Now his former teammate, Mets third baseman Jose Reyes, is getting some similar coverage about his so-called “double life.”

The story comes via the Daily News, who conducted an exclusive interview with a woman named Christina Sanchez, who had a six-year affair with Reyes, resulting in the birth of a daughter. Unlike Colon, who was alleged to have failed to support his out-of-wedlock children, Reyes has apparently paid support to Sanchez for years and a relationship with his daughter. Sanchez refers to herself and their daughter as Reyes’ “road family”:

According to Sanchez, who’s suing Reyes for a significant increase in child support, she and her daughter were Reyes’ “road family” while he raised a separate family back home during his tenure with the Mets, the Miami Marlins and the Toronto Blue Jays.

“We’d go to restaurants, go to games, go shopping, that was the life I was living,” Sanchez told the Daily News, saying that she now regrets that the affair went on as long it did. “It was a double life, but I wanted him to be a father of our child.”

The relationship came to an end, Sanchez, says, after Reyes’ arrest for domestic violence in late 2015. Reyes has apparently not seen his daughter with Sanchez since that time. Reyes has been paying $11,000 a month in child support. Sanchez wants that increased to $41,000 a month, claiming that she put her singing career on hold to raise their child while Reyes was, at best, a part time and now absent father. That’s a matter for the courts, of course. Reyes is making $22 million this year under the six-year, $105 million contract he signed with the Marlins before the 2011 season.

This sort of story is not exactly new in the world of baseball. From Reyes to Colon to Chipper Jones and, I am sure, scores if not hundreds of ballplayers going back to the Elysian Fields, the combination of a lot of time on the road, a lot of fame, a lot of money and, of course, youth and athleticism, has led many ballplayers into temptation and, eventually, trouble.

When the Colon story hit, I wrote a lot of words about how it’s a good idea to separate a player’s accomplishments on the field from their character and personal life. I certainly still believe that. To be sure, Reyes has certainly committed greater transgressions than this and, unlike Colon, at least he has been supporting his daughter.

Still: I’m guessing the last thing the Mets wanted were more headlines about Reyes due to off-the-field stuff. At least Colon had some goodwill and popularity to burn. Reyes was already a tough if not impossible sell to fans who want to believe the players they root for are good people. Now this.

Aaron Hicks to go on the disabled list with an oblique injury

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Yankees outfielder Aaron Hicks left Sunday’s game against the Rangers after four innings due to soreness in his right oblique. After the game, Hicks said he expects to go on the 10-day disabled list and miss the next three to four weeks, MLB.com’s Bryan Hoch reports.

Hicks was 1-for-2 with a single before departing on Sunday. He entered the game batting .288/.397/.515 with 10 home runs and 37 RBI in 198 plate appearances. It is by far the best season of his career.

Jacoby Ellsbury is on his way back from a concussion, so the Yankees will only have to bridge the gap in center field for a week or two. Mason Williams could draw some starts in center field in the meantime.

Report: Phillies making Maikel Franco available in trade discussions

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Nick Cafardo of the Boston Globe reports that the Phillies are making third baseman Maikel Franco “more than available” in trade discussions.

Franco, 24, is having an abysmal season after showing promise in 2015 and ’16. Through 289 plate appearances, he’s hitting .221/.280/.365 with nine home runs and 37 RBI. His hitting has tanked and his already below-average defense hasn’t shown any improvement.

It’s a bit surprising that the Phillies would be so eager to move Franco with his value about as low as it can go. Franco is also under control of the rebuilding Phillies through the 2021 season, so the team doesn’t have to rush into moving him. He will become eligible for arbitration for the first time after the season.

Furthermore, the Phillies don’t have an immediate replacement for Franco at third base. Andres Blanco would likely get everyday starts at the hot corner in the short-term, but as far as prospects go, there are no third baseman banging down the door. If the Phillies were to trade Franco, it would likely have to be in return for a young, talented third baseman who will be under team control for several more years.