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Report: Carlos Correa not interested in signing contract extension

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Agent Greg Genske said that his client, Astros shortstop Carlos Correa, “is never going to do [an early] multiyear contract,” Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports.

It’s not exactly a pressing matter, as Correa won’t become eligible for arbitration until after the 2018 season and he won’t become eligible for free agency until after the 2021 season. However, one of the biggest changes we’ve seen in baseball over the last few years is the tendencies for teams to try to sign their young star players to contract extensions even before they hit arbitration eligibility. Their thinking is that they pay more money up front to save significantly more money later on when the player establishes himself as a star. Take Giants ace Madison Bumgarner as an example. He’s signed to a five-year, $35 million contract with two club options for the 2018 and ’19 seasons. If he were to hit the free agent market right now, he’d earn hundreds of millions of dollars, but he took the up-front financial security when it was offered to him as a 22-year-old.

Correa, as Heyman notes, has a sponsorship deal with Adidas and other companies that will help him stay financially secure in the near future even if he suffers an injury and/or his performance drops off, hurting his future earnings. Correa, unlike Bumgarner, will forego money now to hopefully make much more money later.

In his first three seasons in the majors, Correa has hit .276/.354/.471 with 43 home runs, 167 RBI, 132 runs scored, and 27 stolen bases in 1,136 plate appearances. He’s already racked up over 10 Wins Above Replacement according to Baseball Reference, and he’s still five months away from his 23rd birthday.

Mariners acquire Nick Rumbelow from Yankees

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The Mariners acquired Yankees’ right-hander Nick Rumbelow in exchange for minor league righty Juan Then and left-hander JP Sears, per an official announcement on Saturday. Rumbelow made 17 appearances for the Yankees in 2015 before undergoing Tommy John surgery and could provide some bullpen depth for the Mariners in 2018.

The 26-year-old right-hander spent the majority of his 2017 season in Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, where he delivered an 0.62 ERA, 2.5 BB/9 and 9.3 SO/9 over 29 innings. The Yankees didn’t rush Rumbelow into a full workload after he missed the 2016 season recovering from Tommy John, but he didn’t appear to have any significant setbacks with his health or performance and should be ready to compete for a role next spring.

Sears, 21, was ranked 21st in the Mariners’ organization by MLB Pipeline. He was drafted in the 11th round of the 2017 draft and features a deceptive, low-velocity fastball that he can throw for strikes to either side of the plate. In his first year of pro ball, he split 17 games between Short-Season A Everett and Single-A Clinton, turning in an 0.65 ERA, 3.9 BB/9 and 16.6 SO/9 across two levels.

Then, 17, also completed his first year of pro ball after signing with the Mariners as a free agent. He went 2-2 in 13 games of rookie ball, pitching to a 2.64 ERA, 2.2 BB/9 and 8.2 SO/9 in 61 1/3 innings. Neither Sears nor Then will take the mound for the Yankees anytime soon, and offloading Rumbelow to the Mariners should clear up some room on New York’s 40-man roster as they prepare for the upcoming Rule 5 Draft.