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Phillies to induct Pete Rose on the Wall of Fame this summer

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The Phillies announced on Monday that the organization will induct Pete Rose into its Wall of Fame, found in Ashburn Alley at Citizens Bank Park. The ceremony will be held on August 12.

The Phillies have typically inducted one past member of the organization into the Wall of Fame every year. Jim Thome was last year’s inductee. Inductees have typically been former players, but managers (Gavvy Cravath, Dallas Green, Charlie Manuel), coaches (John Vukovich), and broadcasters (Harry Kalas) have also been included.

Rose, now 75, played five seasons with the Phillies between 1979-83. He was considered instrumental in the team winning its first ever championship in 1980 against the Royals, ending a 98-year drought. He also helped the Phillies return to the World Series in 1983, where they lost to the Orioles. In his five seasons in Philadelphia, Rose hit .291/.365/.361.

Rose, of course, is more well-known as a member of the Reds, with which he spent his first 16 seasons. He’s also well-known as baseball’s all-time hits leader at 4,256, but he is not in the Hall of Fame as he was ruled permanently ineligible in 1989 from having bet on baseball.

As a Phillies fan — admittedly one born after Rose’s career ended — I find his induction to be odd. He played less than one-fifth of his career with the team and, while he was considered to be one of the players most responsible for helping the Phillies win it all for the first time, the Phillies have since won another World Series, reducing the need to fetishize the first. Besides, the 1980 team has been well-recognized as is: Paul Owens (1988), Steve Carlton (1989), Mike Schmidt (1990), Larry Bowa (1991), Greg Luzinski (1988), Tug McGraw (1999), Garry Maddox (2001), Bob Boone (2005), Dallas Green (2006), and John Vukovich (2007) have all been honored on the Wall of Fame. Comparatively, only a handful of members of the well-loved 1993 Phillies team — which lost the World Series in heartbreaking fashion to the Blue Jays — have been honored: Darren Daulton (2010), John Kruk (2011), and Curt Schilling (2013).

With Jimmy Rollins on his way out of baseball, this would have been the perfect time for recognizing the impact he had on the organization since making his major league debut in 2000. He won the 2007 NL MVP Award, helped the Phillies win it all in 2008, and helped them nearly win it again the next year. Only two members of the 2008 team have been recognized thus far: Charlie Manuel (2014) and Pat Burrell (2015) — though that’s mostly because many members of that team are still active. Brad Lidge, who went 48-for-48 in save opportunities in 2008 (including the regular season and playoffs), is also a great candidate for the Wall of Fame.

Ultimately, it’s a business decision and the Phillies likely felt that the ignominious Rose would draw more eyeballs than anybody else that they could feasibly honor this summer. And they’re probably not wrong. Those who idolized Rose during his playing days are in the age bracket that consumes the most baseball.

Mets may move Asdrubal Cabrera to second base upon return from DL

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Newsday’s Marc Carig reports that the Mets may move Asdrubal Cabrera to second base when he returns from the disabled list. Cabrera has been on the disabled list since June 13 with a sprained left thumb, but he’s expected to be activated on Friday.

Cabrera, 31, last played second base in 2014 with the Nationals. He has played shortstop exclusively as a Met the last two seasons. Jose Reyes would continue to play shortstop if the Mets were to go through with the position change. Cabrera would displace T.J. Rivera, who has been playing second base in place of the injured Neil Walker.

In 196 plate appearances this season, Cabrera is hitting .244/.321/.392 with six home runs and 20 RBI. He has made 11 defensive errors, which is tied for the third-most among shortstops behind Tim Anderson (16) and Dansby Swanson (12).

Corey Knebel sets modern record for consecutive appearances with a strikeout

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Brewers closer Corey Knebel set a modern major league record for relievers to start a season, as Thursday’s appearance marked his 38th consecutive appearance with a strikeout. He set down the side in order in the ninth inning, striking Josh Bell out to start the frame.

Aroldis Chapman held the record previously, recording a strikeout in his first 37 appearances of the season in 2014 with the Reds.

Knebel, 25, has flown under the radar despite having an incredibly good season. He moved into the closer’s role in mid-May when Neftali Feliz, now a free agent, struggled. After Thursday’s appearance, Knebel is 12-for-15 in save chances with a 0.96 ERA and a 65/17 K/BB ratio in 37 2/3 innings.