Noah Syndergaard doesn’t think much of the World Baseball Classic

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Noah Syndergaard, like a lot of baseball’s biggest American stars, is not playing in the World Baseball Classic. Today he offered a lot of honesty about why, exactly, he’s not doing it. This transcript from an interview this afternoon comes via Marc Carig:

Reporter: You have some teammates going to the WBC pretty soon. Does any part of you wish you could be there as well?

Syndergaard: Nope. Not one bit.

Reporter: Why not?

Syndergaard: Because I’m a Met. And ain’t nobody made it to the Hall of Fame or win the World Series playing in the WBC.

He’s not going to thrill anyone at the league office with that exchange, but it is honest.

Even if you think the World Baseball Classic is great — and I know a lot of people who truly enjoy it — the only real incentive for playing in the WBC is national pride and, perhaps, the ability to experience something different than the usual stuff one experiences in baseball.

While that impulse may vary from player to player, it’s worth noting that for most American players, baseball has never been strongly associated with international competition. Certainly not to the level which it is felt by players from countries which have a greater tradition of international tournaments. And by players familiar with the concept of having to leave one’s country to play the game at its highest level. When one does that, home probably matters more and one’s pride in one’s home country’s baseball tradition may be more important. That concept is utterly foreign to most U.S. players. When you grow up and play only in the United States you’re just not thinking about baseball in international terms. You’re pretty much only thinking about the World Series and your major league team.

I figure that has always been the case and will always be the case to some degree. The only thing that could have challenged it was if there had been some feeling of humiliation at losing the first WBC. Well, we’ve had three of them so far and the U.S. hasn’t won any of them, so there will never be some Dream Team push to assemble our country’s best players like we saw in basketball once upon a time.

The game went on with the U.S. not putting forth its best effort in the WBC and thus it always will. Syndergaard’s comments may not be the most diplomatic in this regard, but I suspect he is not alone in feeling that way.

Kenley Jansen’s consecutive saves streak ends at 34

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Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen gave up three runs in the top of the ninth inning during Sunday’s game against the Braves, blowing his first save since August 26 last season. He had converted 34 consecutive saves.

Jansen yielded back-to-back singles to lead off the ninth inning, staked to a 4-1 lead. After getting two outs, Matt Adams hit a three-run home run down the right field line to knot the game at four apiece.

After Sunday’s lackluster performance, Jansen is now 24-for-25 in save chances this season with a 1.49 ERA and a 62/2 K/BB ratio in 42 1/3 innings.

Zach Britton sets American League record with 55th consecutive save

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Orioles closer Zach Britton finished Sunday’s 9-7 victory over the Astros with a scoreless ninth inning, earning his sixth save of the season. He has now earned the save in 55 consecutive opportunities dating back to September 2015, setting a new American League record. Tom Gordon previously held the record with 54 consecutive saves. Eric Gagne holds the major league record at 84.

Britton’s last blown save came on September 20, 2015, then converted two more saves before the end of the regular season. He went 47-for-47 in save chances last season and is six-for-six so far this year.

Along with his six saves, Britton has a 2.65 ERA and a 13/8 K/BB ratio in 17 innings this season. The lefty came off the disabled list earlier this month after missing two months with a strained left forearm.