No big rules changes in 2017; Rob Manfred blames the union’s “lack of cooperation”

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There have been a number of possible rules changes discussed this offseason, most of which would be aimed at speeding up the pace of play. Automatic intentional walks and pitch clocks have been mentioned. Limiting trips to the mound. Some more radical experiments have been suggested as well.

All of the ideas about potential rules changes have started with the league and ownership. They were then informally vetted through columns from well-connected columnists, all of which portrayed them as feasible and not insane, even though some of them are a bit out there. Of course, any substantive rules changes have to be agreed to by the union, so the mere fact of the league’s mentioning a change and pushing it on to their sources in the media does not mean they are a done deal or even close to a done deal.

Rob Manfred would prefer you not be reminded of that, however. He’d prefer that you think of these changes as all-but-implemented before the evil Players Union swooped in to ruin things. I mean, how else is one to take this:

The “lack of cooperation” spin is subtle, but significant. He wants to portray the MLBPA as intransigent — as kids stomping their feet — not as an equal partner in the process of rule making. He wants to make every single complaint about a long game or a slowly-played game an indictment of the players, not a product of many decisions and priorities, most of which are league and club priorities, not player priorities. Things like start times for games and commercial break length and in-game entertainment and advertisements and what have you. Nope, it’s all the players.

Maybe — and hear me out — the rules changes proposed by the league were dumb? Maybe players have every right to say so and to weigh in on the terms of their employment? Maybe they don’t like being dictated to like the league has appeared to be doing and they don’t like to have to answer questions from reporters based on an agenda set on Park Avenue as opposed to in their own clubhouse. Could Manfred not know this?

Hahaha, of course knows all of this. He is an expert when it comes to collective bargaining and labor relations so he knows perfectly well that the players have a say on these things. But he also knows full well that it’s in MLB’s best interest to have fans think that the players are spoiled babies who whine about not getting their way. And his comments here are calculated to create that impression among baseball fans.

 

Cubs designate Brett Anderson for assignment

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The Cubs announced on Wednesday that pitcher Brett Anderson was activated from the 60-day disabled list and subsequently designated for assignment to open up a spot on the 40-man roster.

Anderson, 29, had been out since May 7 with a lower back strain. Across six starts prior to the injury, the lefty yielded 20 earned runs on 34 hits and 12 walks with 16 strikeouts in 22 innings. He has logged just 33 1/3 innings over the last two seasons and has crossed the 50-inning threshold just since dating back to 2011.

Despite his lengthy injury history, Anderson will likely still draw some interest once he becomes a free agent as he throws with his left hand and can be had for the major league minimum salary.

Dilson Herrera has season-ending surgery

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Reds infielder Dilson Herrera will undergo surgery to remove bone spurs from his right shoulder. His season is over.

Herrera, you may recall, was acquired from the Mets in the Jay Bruce trade last year. He played in 49 games for the Mets, but spent all of last year and this year in the minors. In parts of seven minor league seasons he’s hit .295/.357/.461 with 67 homers and 87 stolen bases in 631 games.

Herrera, one time a top-5 prospect of the Mets, was expected to play in the bigs this year, but hasn’t. He was expected to challenge for the starting second base job for the Reds next year, but that’s obviously in doubt now. The worst part: he’ll be out of minor league options next year, so the Reds will be pressured to either put him on the big league roster fresh off an injury or else risk losing him via waivers, which I suspect he’d be unlikely to clear.