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Wanna buy a minority share in the Dodgers?

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Are you a billionaire or, perhaps, a centimillionaire who is bored with day-to-day investing? Would you like to be treated like a god when you go to a ballgame rather than merely being treated like a king like all the other luxury box owners? Do you want to brag to your friends at the country club about how the business you partially own makes it, like, three steps from the top of its industry year after year?

If so, do the Dodgers have a deal for you! Bill Shaikin of the Times:

The Dodgers’ owners are interested in selling a small share of the team and have retained an investment banker to solicit bids.

There is no timetable for a possible sale, said the banker, Sal Galatioto. He added that Mark Walter would remain the Dodgers’ controlling owner, with his partners from Guggenheim Baseball Management.

This, like the way the Mets sold minority shares a few years ago, is a means of getting some liquidity into the hands of Mark Walter and his fellow Dodgers owners. If you buy a piece of the Dodgers you won’t get to hire or fire anyone and Tommy Lasorda will still get a better parking place than you. You will get access to a luxury box or maybe seats behind home plate. Though not as good as those seats that agent with the dark hair and glasses who sits just to the first base side of the lefthanded batters box gets. He’s there every night and he’s not moving for you.

But you will get to say you own a part of the Dodgers. You will get bugged for cash calls on occasion. You will get a polite “no” when asked to examine the financial records of the business and, if you actually do get to see them, you will likely be obliged to tell people that, really, baseball teams make no money at all, because that’s what baseball owners do.  And, in 5, 10, 20 or never years from now, when the majority owners decide to sell the team, you or your descendants may make a nice profit. Before then the principal owners can likely buy you out at a bargain rate for them, should you require it.

Yes, all of the perks of owning a non-controlling interest in a closely held company can be yours if you have, say, $20 million for a vanity investment. Who wouldn’t want that?

Brian Dozier, Todd Frazier, and Didi Gregorius say teams should expand protective netting

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Earlier, a young fan was struck by a foul ball at Yankee Stadium and had to be carried out before being taken to a hospital. Fortunately, it seems that the fan is okay.

As usual, when a scary incident such as today’s occurs, players come out in full support of expanding the protective netting at ballparks. Twins second baseman Brian Dozier as well as Yankees third baseman Todd Frazier and shortstop Didi Gregorius all said as much after Wednesday afternoon’s game.

Phillies shortstop Freddy Galvis has also been a very vocal proponent of increased netting. For the most part, the players are pretty much all in agreement about the subject. It’s only a vocal minority of fans who seem to think that their ability to snag a random souvenir or have an unimpeded view supersedes the safety of their neighbors.

Video: Giancarlo Stanton hits a laser for his 56th home run

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Marlins outfielder Giancarlo Stanton continued his march towards 60 home runs, hitting No. 56 in Wednesday afternoon’s win against the Mets. The Marlins, leading 7-2 prior to Stanton’s two-run blast in the bottom of the eighth, didn’t need the extra run support but welcomed it all the same. Mets reliever Erik Goeddel tossed a 1-1, 78 MPH curve that caught too much of the plate.

After Wednesday’s action, Stanton is batting .279/.378/.634 with 120 RBI and 116 runs scored along with the 56 dingers in 646 plate appearances. The last player to hit at least 56 home runs in a season was Ryan Howard (58) in 2006. Stanton’s is the 19th player-season of at least 56 homers.