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Brian Cashman went to prep school with Trump’s Supreme Court nominee

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Stop. Before you say anything, yes, it’s a slow news day. I don’t care. I’ve had have a long fascination with the intersection of baseball and judges, primarily based on the fact that my very first law school professor used Major League Baseball’s official rules as a means of introducing us to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure.

Anyway:

Yankees general manager Brian Cashman was the most famous Georgetown Prep Class of ’85 alum for three decades … until this week. Classmate Neil Gorsuch, President Trump’s nomination for the vacant Supreme Court seat, trumps (pun intended!) a successful baseball exec … even one who has led the country’s most successful sports franchise to four World Series championships.

Cashman was hired as a Yankees intern in 1986 and became the general manager in 1998. Supreme Court justices hold their position for life, and Gorsuch is now 49. It’ll be interesting to see who, in the end, has their sweet gig for a longer period of time. And it will be a close contest, I presume, between which one catches more hell from the press. Just an occupational hazard for a Yankees GM and a Supreme Court justice.

 

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.