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MLB’s Twitter account polled fans about the Hall of Fame. The results were… something.

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With about 20 minutes to go until the Hall of Fame results are announced, Ryan Thibodaux — who has been doing yeoman’s work tracking writers’ submitted ballots — currently has Tim Raines, Jeff Bagwell, and Ivan “Pudge” Rodriguez having crossed the necessary 75 percent vote threshold to be enshrined. Trevor Hoffman and Vladimir Guerrero aren’t far behind, above 70 percent but below 75.

Throughout this entire process, fans and pundits alike have been criticizing some of the more curious ballots. There was Murray Chass and his intentionally blank ballot. Bill Livingston of the Cleveland Plain Dealer meant to abstain but submitted a blank ballot instead. Dan Shaughnessy of The Boston Globe didn’t vote for Edgar Martinez because he wasn’t “feared,” apparently. The list goes on.

As a unit, though, the writers do a pretty good job of making the right calls. There are outliers, sure, but very rarely has the Baseball Writers Association of America inducted a truly undeserving player or completely whiffed on a deserving player. (Kenny Lofton, Alan Trammell, and Lou Whitaker notwithstanding.)

MLB’s official Twitter account polled fans this afternoon, asking if certain relevant players on the ballot (e.g. Mike Mussina, not Pat Burrell) were Hall of Famers. After collating the results, MLB found that the fans would have elected… no one.

No Barry Bonds or Roger Clemens is understandable, if naive. No Curt Schilling makes sense. But no Tim Raines or Edgar Martinez? No Billy Wagner or Larry Walker? The BBWAA has never looked better.

A 30-year-old rookie won his major league debut

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The Dodgers beat the Twins last night thanks to a Cody Bellinger three-run homer. But Bellinger was not the only Dodgers rookie who had a notable game. A far more unconventional one is worth mentioning as well.

That rookie is reliever Edward Paredes, who made his big league debut last night. What makes him unconventional: he’s 30. Turns 31 in September, actually. Paredes pitched professionally for 12 years before making it to The Show. Most of that time was in the affiliated minors in the Mariners, Indians, Angels and Dodgers organizations. He spent time in the independent Atlantic League in 2013-15 as well.

Paredes did not do anything heroic last night. It was more of a right place/right time kind of appearance, retiring the side in order with a fly out, line out and a ground out and remaining the pitcher of record while Bellinger hit that three-run homer. That’s enough for a W, though. A W that Paredes waited a lot longer for than most pitchers who notch one in the bigs.

The Nationals could pursue Sonny Gray

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Jon Morosi of MLB Network says that the Nationals could pursue Athletics right-hander Sonny Gray if Stephen Strasburg‘s forearm issue lingers. Strasburg left Sunday’s start early due to forearm tightness, saying he was unable to get loose. Sometimes that’s a sign of a major injury. Sometimes it’s just a thing that happens and then goes away.

The Nationals will have to make a determination as to how big a deal this all is pretty soon, though, as a lot of other teams, including the Yankees, Brewers and Astros have all been linked to Gray. It seems inevitable at this point that the A’s will move their ace before Monday’s trade deadline.

Gray is set to start tonight. It may very well be his last in an A’s uniform.