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Report: Neftali Feliz close to deal with Brewers

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According to Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports, free agent right-hander Neftali Feliz is reportedly close to signing a deal with the Brewers. The 28-year-old has also been linked to the Dodgers and Nationals over the last month, though nothing substantial has surfaced on those fronts.

Milwaukee GM David Stearns has been shopping relief options as recently as last week, per a report from Tom Haudricourt of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. While his roster doesn’t appear to lack any significant bullpen pieces, the loss of closer Tyler Thornburg to the Red Sox last month has left the club wanting for more depth. Feliz, meanwhile, could potentially step into the closing role in Milwaukee, provided that his resurgence in 2016 wasn’t a one-time deal.

The veteran righty is coming off of an impressive tour with the Pirates, during which he sustained a 3.52 ERA, 3.5 BB/9 and 10.2 SO/9 in 53 2/3 innings. His time on the mound was highlighted by a promising spike in velocity, accompanied by the second-highest strikeout rate of his career to date, though he missed the last month of the season after suffering a bout of arm soreness.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.