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Report: Carl Crawford might be ready to call it quits

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According to the Boston Globe’s Nick Cafardo, a Dodgers official believes that free agent outfielder Carl Crawford is ready to retire from Major League Baseball. Crawford, 35, was released from the Dodgers last June during his fourth year with the organization.

Prior to his release, Crawford slashed a career-worst .185/.230/.235 with just three extra bases in 30 games during the Dodgers’ 2016 season. Over his 15-year career, he maintained a batting line of .290/.330/435 with 136 home runs, 480 stolen bases and 42.1 fWAR, peaking during his nine-year stint with the Rays.

Last September, a report from Cafardo suggested that Crawford was on the lookout for a new major league landing spot for 2017, with the Astros and Rays mentioned as potential targets. The outfielder still has $21.8 million left on his contract, which should be covered by the Dodgers this year. No retirement plans have been confirmed or denied by Crawford as of yet.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.