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Minor league umps make more, get a higher per diem than the players

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Minor league umpires have a union and just negotiated a new contract to cover the next five years. In addition to some quality of life things such as hotels with interior access (i.e. no Motel 6s) and family leave, they’re getting pay raises:

The minimum monthly salary for rookie and short-season Class A umpires, which had started at $1,900 under the previous five-year agreement, will rise to $2,000 under the new deal and increase to as much as $2,300 for a fourth-year umpire.

For full-season Class A, the minimum rises from $2,000 to $2,100 and increases to $2,600 by a seventh season. At Double-A, the minimum goes up from $2,300 to $2,500 and rises to $3,100 by a ninth season. At Triple-A, it goes up from $2,600 to $2,900 and rises to $3,900 by a 14th season.

As Ben Badler of Baseball America notes, this is a better deal than minor league players get. Monthly salaries for non-40 man roster players are $1,150 for the short season teams, $1,300 for low A and $1,500 for high A. For players repeating a year at the same level, the salary goes up $50 each year. For AA, the monthly salary is $1,700 and it goes up $100 per month for subsequent years. For AAA, the monthly salary is $2,150 per month and it goes up to $2,400 the second year and $2700 the third year.

Pays to have a union, kids.

Report: Twins sign Erick Aybar to minor-league deal

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The Twins have reportedly signed free agent shortstop Erick Aybar to a minor-league deal, LaVelle E. Neal III of the Star Tribune reported Friday. FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman adds that the deal comes with a potential $1.25 million if Aybar reaches the majors, with additional incentives based on plate appearances. He’ll be able to opt out on March 27. The team has yet to confirm the signing.

Aybar, 34, is now four years removed from his career year in 2014. He’s been in a state of steady decline since then, slashing just .234/.300/.348 with seven home runs and 11 stolen bases over 370 plate appearances for the Padres in 2017. His poor performance wasn’t helped by a fractured left foot, either, which cost him almost six weeks on the disabled list.

Still, the Twins see something promising in the veteran infielder, and reportedly intend to use him as another utility option this spring. Per Neal, Aybar will join fellow backup infielders Eduardo Escobar and Ehire Adrianza and may even (temporarily) take over for Miguel Sano at third base if Sano isn’t able to shape up for the role by Opening Day.